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Cancerous Womb – Born of a Cancerous Womb

Posted in CD, Metal with tags , , on 25th February 2014 by mariadodarmata

Cancerous Womb
Born of a Cancerous Womb
Released February 24th, 2014
Grindcore
Released via: Grindscene Records

Today I’m reviewing Cancerous Womb‘s Born of a Cancerous Womb (which has a song called Born of a Cancerous Womb in it)  and just by now I’ve had enough alliterations, thank you.

As it can be expected from the song titles (Up to my Nuts in Guts, Grind Tear & Slice, Torn from Gunt to Cunt…) and my quick metal archives research, the song lyrics revolve around guts, sexual assault, gore, death and other slightly revolting themes, like paedophiles – was one of the members a Lost Prophets fan?. The lyrics are plagued with graphic descriptions of cutting someone open and moving gigantic fat flaps, masturbating to little children and even makes a reference to those news of this woman in Austria trapped in her fathers basement having his incest kids, meaning: what you would expect. I do have to give them mega-props for using the line “more chins than a Chinese phone book” in one of the songs. I laughed so hard I freaked out the people around me.

Music wise this was far more melodic than I expected to be. The larger part of the “gory”  bands I’ve listened to lately lack all sense of melody. The less melody the bigger your testicles, right? But Cancerus Womb achieves a sound almost (if I may say) Terrorizer sounding: just the right amount of melody in there to make the music worth listening to. I have no issues with comparing these guys to such music giants.

Even though I lost the taste for this kind of music years ago, today I find myself recovering my mix CD’s and listening to those senseless 24 second songs about chainsaw murderers. Cancerous Womb made a more than decent album, worth listening to, with lyrics that may go around the predictable but still fun to listen to.

4/5

María Mata

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Hypocrisy – End of Disclosure

Posted in CD, Metal with tags , , , , , on 20th May 2013 by mariadodarmata

End of Disclosure
Hypocrisy
Melodic Death / Death Metal
Released March 22nd 2013
Released via: Nuclear Blast

Hypocrisy is that kind of band that even if you are not in to the kind of music they do, you have at least heard of the once. Doing some awesome music since the last century, they released their newest work just a few weeks ago. And what a release! If you were expecting hearing some of their characteristic sci-fi themes, you are in for a surprise… sort of.

The album starts up with rather epic sounding melodics. A prelude for some alien experimenting tune? Nope. The album has a consistent theme regarding social issues. For the first four songs and then the seventh we hear a harsh but dead-on critique to social repression by media and wealth, greed, a bit of capitalism, war and some world wealth distribution. It is like a call for revolution, The Eye (third song) being my favourite -  rhythm, melody and theme wise.

On the other songs we can find some early Hypocrisy themes: genocide, nightmares, death, hell and demons populate the themes of the songs. In Hell is Where I Stay (sixth song of the album) the lyrics go on about how the protagonist lives in hell, comes for your soul, makes Jesus weep, yet don’t ever explicitly mention being a demon or Satan.., Super smooth! In a different note, in  44 Double Zero (track five) I found a rather Balls to the Wall sound on the bridge and pre-chorus.

Going back to what’s important, if it wasn’t for The Return (Ninth and last song of the album), I’d say songs five, six and eight are just floating there disconnected, but said song comes and ties together the social inequity mentioned constantly throughout the album with that fantasy element of the songs. Starting up with a super soft, melodic intro that then turns heavy (which reminds me to Insomnium’s Equivalence album), the song is the epitome of the whole albums thematic. Takes that inequity message and blends it together with the magic flying demons thing, culminating a call for revolution and change.

This album is highly recommended both to old Hypocrisy fans and new listeners.

4.5/5

María Mata

Hypocrisy online:

http://www.hypocrisy.cc/
http://www.facebook.com/hypocrisy
http://www.youtube.com/hypocrisy
http://twitter.com/hypocrisyband
http://www.reverbnation.com/hypocrisy
http://www.myspace.com/hypocrisy
http://www.last.fm/music/Hypocrisy

Godlike – Malicious Mind

Posted in Alternative, CD, Metal with tags , , , , , , , , , , on 26th December 2012 by mariadodarmata

Godlike
Malicious Mind
Alternative/Melodic Death Metal
Released: October 2012
Released via Inverse Records.

Godlike is a new Finnish band. Malicious Mind is their debut album. As soon as you start playing it you guess the kind of influences they have… Made me have a regression to the early 2000’s.

With strong nu metal references mixed with melodic death, kind of in a Five Finger Death Punch way, they manage to take that Limp Bizkit sound and put make it sound a bit fresher.

The album goes down the nu metal road the first 4 songs. In Original Rebel takes a turn more to the death metal side with heavier sounding elements on the music and a song theme that made me think of Destruction’s The Antichrist. Then comes Shi No Negai and stirs the album back in the previous direction.

The album doesn’t have a central topic that the songs revolve around, at least an apparent  one. Some songs talk about the Catholic Church and the original sin, same others talk about this chick who is a hot mess, or how someone betrayed them. I find these last ones extremely cheesy but they melody and rhythm are quite catchy.

The album sounds solid and like an album made of t best songs they wrote during the years. I am a bit excited to see how they do next, for I believe their next album will be deciding on their future. I am not such a big fan of this kind of music, but keeping an objective eye on that aspect, the album is not bad.

3.5/5

María Mata

 

Incassum – Rite of Passage

Posted in CD, Metal with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on 12th November 2012 by mariadodarmata

Incassum
Rite of Passage
Released: November 24th

Melodic Death Metal
Released via Rocksector Records

Rite of Passage came to my hands – my cybernetic hands -  when I was asked if I wanted to review a female fronted melodic death metal band [editor’s note: I never told Maria the band have a female vocalist]. Personally, I hate when female fronted bands use that female factor as a “Look at me! I’m special!” card – Though some bands do need it.

The words fast and aggressive describe this album pretty good. It gives me that feeling of craving headbanging to it even in the most awkward, crowded public places. The clean vocals and occasional acoustic guitars come and refresh the songs, taking away that cheesy feeling some death metal bands have after a few songs.

Listening to Incassum, I can’t help but to think about a now extinct Prog Metal band from my area. From the vocal style to the music they are quite alike and it gives me a pleasant flashback. Sadly enough it also takes me back 5-6 years to the time I would listen to stuff that sounded brOOtal just for the sake of being brOOtal.

Sharleen Kennedy’s vocals are a mix of Candace Kucsulain (Walls of Jericho) with Lacey Mosley (ex-Flyleaf) and the music seems to me to be a mix of Swedish Death Metal with a couple of touches of Prog Rock, a tiny bit or Core and a teaspoon of Opeth’s  mysticism. To some point, it actually had a bit of a Dethklok feeling to it.

Although I have mixed feelings about the album I’m going leave those subjective matters aside and tell you that Rite of Passage is a good Melodic Death metal album. It moves away from what the Finnish have done to the genre – though I will clarify, I adore Finnish death metal. Incassum is like a breath of fresh air out of that melancholic aura that Melodeath is now. To make it into a pretty analogy, it is like climbing to a tree top after being lost for weeks in the black forest.

Incassum are not one of those bands that play on the female factor. They should get rid of the Arch Enemy stigma associated to that kind of bands and just promote themselves as what they are: A good Melodic Death Metal band.

4/5

María Mata

Wall of the Eyeless – Through Emptiness

Posted in CD, Metal with tags , on 3rd October 2012 by mariadodarmata

Wall of the Eyeless
Through Emptiness
December 31st, 2011
Death Metal
Self-Reseased

Today, I had the pleasure of listening to the demo album of the amazing Swedish duo Wall of the Eyeless. Originally from Russia, SL (Guitars, bass, vocals) met Simon (Drums) at Swedish school, where they recorded this demo with hardly any post production (which does explain the “basement demo” sound). That “trve-like”  sound gives the record part of the melancholic, dark ambient it has, something I really like about it.

The first song is called The Hands. It sets the mood and the foundations for the rest of the demo. It has an exciting sound, very well arranged music and a really nice simplicity to it. The rhythm  although fast, makes you want to lie down in bed on a rainy day just to listen to this in a loop (which I must confess, I did) and just relax. The other songs just continue to pull you to that state of mind and creating that ambient that you can still feel after the music ends.

Regarding lyrics, I absolutely loved them. Very poetic, really beautiful, especially the last verse of Do We Belong Here?and the whole Wall of the Eyeless song. The Raingives it the perfect closure with a pretty, slow melody but at the same time, invites you to hit the replay button.

This Demo is brilliant. It has all the perfect components: The darkish ambient, the pretty melodies,  the harsh vocals, the poetical lyrics… they all come together in perfect harmony. This is a band I want to listen more of, and I hope I get to listen more form them soon. I am planing on buying their Demo to support them and I assure you, it is a good inversion.

5/5

María Mata

Sabbath Assembly – Ye Are Gods

Posted in CD, Rock with tags , , , , , , on 2nd September 2012 by mariadodarmata

Sabbath Assembly
Ye Are Gods

Released: Fall 2012
Devotional Rock

Released Via Anja Records / Svart Records

 

“We are the servants of GOD, no less.” With this phrase starts Sabbath Assembly’s latest creation.

As soon as I started listening, a flashback to the years that my mum, as a good catholic, made me go to church; a chant, a priest talking and then a lady with a guitar playing some song. Logic says that because of this connection I’d absolutely hate it, but the music is incredibly pleasant.
After the first whole listen what came to me was “a mix of hippie rock with Gregorian chants”, especially has this hippie bong fire round feeling.

In terms of lyrics, the songs are based on hymns of The Process Church of the Final Judgment, so if you are no familiarised with this cult, it might be a little confusing. Overlooking that fact, the music is incredibly engaging and exciting. I am most definitively not the flower power/praise out Lord Jesus type, but there is something fascinating about them.

Throughout the album, a story about the four main characters (Christ, Jehovah, Lucifer and Satan) is narrated. Form their love/hate relationship to the effects of them in our lives. The story of the apocalypse and the new beginning is told and a terrible character is introduced to us (for the second time, I believe): Abbadon, both villain and sort of unsung hero. The mix of church organs with heavier instruments added up to the constant listening of the names Christ and Satan make his one of the most interesting things your ear will ever have the pleasure to listen to.
With interesting messages and beautiful melodies, Sabbath Assembly created a gift to our senses. Hopefully y will give this album a try so you and discover its full beauty.

4/5

María Mata

Interview: Sabbath Assembly

Posted in Interview with tags , , , , , , , , on 26th August 2012 by mariadodarmata

Sabbath Assembly, formed in ‘09, are the modern response to a religious movement known as The Process Church of Final Judgement. The band have a unique sound, merging several different and contrasting styles of music together, from church organs to heavy guitars and choir vocals. Maria managed to have a quick chat with the band from her lemon pledge related duties.

Maria: How did Sabbath Assembly start? What inspired you to start this project?
Sabbath Assembly: I met Timothy Wyllie, an original member of the Process Church, at a book expo in NYC when he was promoting his book about the Church; Love Sex Fear Death.  Looking through his book I was struck by the plates of sheet music of hymns of the Church. Timothy explained that the songs had never before been recorded because they were thought of as liturgical rather than popular. I offered that perhaps now was the time to bring this music to the world, and thus we both hatched a plan at that moment to share the hymns on a wider scale.
M: Do you think you had some sort of “divine inspiration”?
AS: I wouldn’t be so bold as to say that, but I often question what has come over me such that I feel such an uncompromising zeal to pursue this project so relentlessly.  It doesn’t feel as if this is the story of my life, yet it is somehow slowly becoming so.
M: Who did you hope to reach with your music? How has this been received by listeners? Have you gotten any feedback?
AS: I think the question is, “who does the music hope to reach?” and I am not sure that answer.  As of now there don’t seem to be many boundaries in place.  So far we have felt overwhelmingly positive feedback from the metal scene, even though the music is not exactly metal.  Metalheads are not afraid of the dark forces, so we feel this is the reason for the kinship.  Our impression is that the message is coming into the world at the correct time.
M: What is “THE PROCESS CHURCH OF THE FINAL JUDGMENT”? Is it only a congregation or is it an organized church of its own?
AS: The Process Church of the Final Judgment was an organised church that began in the late 60s and survived into the 80s, passing through various forms.  It began as a post-Scientology group therapy and commune experiment that led to contact with the spirit world and a resulting theology that paired psychotherapeutic work with religious tenants that encouraged individuation, wholeness, and self-acceptance.
M: The lyrical the theme of your music is centralised on spiritual things, is this related to the faith you profess?
AS: Yes, the lyrics invoke the four deities Christ, Jehovah, Lucifer and Satan as aspects of ourselves that we are not to suppress but celebrate.  So our “faith” is affirming our complex and rich psychological tapestry.
M: Would you say you are trying to “evangelise” your listeners? Is it part of your goals as musicians to convert someone to a religion?
AS: Not exactly – our first draw to the music is that the words were meaningful for us personally, and then we discovered that the melodies are also quite beautiful, so why not share?  It is not an intention to convert, only for us as band members to perform music we can honestly believe in.  If this happens to be infectious on any level, we are of course pleased.
M: The album is musically varied and has many different sounds in it. How would you describe your music genre wise?
AS: Devotional.
M: You recently released a music video for “In the Time of Abaddon II”, that features various images that I assume are related to your cult or church. Do you have a specific message to be communicated by this imagery?
AS: Yes, the beginning montage contains some imagery related to the history of the Process Church, as well as issues of their concern, such as death and the problem of evil.  In the video this imagery is joined with the recitation of ritual text that prophesies the coming Apocalypse, which we feel is a relevant message for our time.  The Apocalypse can mean the end of the world; it can also mean transformation from one phase of existence to the next; it can also be understood on a personal level as our relationships, accomplishments, and ambitions come to fruition and pass away.
M: Is there anything else you would like to share with us?
AS: “For every end there is a new beginning, and if we are not of the End, then we shall be of the New Beginning.  Either we shall be the ashes of the Phoenix, or his resurrection from the ashes.  And if we care about the death of the Phoenix, then we shall be his ashes, but if we are detached and see the cycle of which his death is but a part, then we shall be his resurrection.
-The Process Church of the Final Judgment, As It Is, 1968