Archive for Timothy Wyllie

Sabbath Assembly premier new track from Ye Are Gods and change release date

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , on 19th September 2012 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Today, Sabbath Assembly premiere a new track from their forthcoming second album, Ye Are Gods. Entitled We Give Our Lives, this eerie, next glimpse into the magick and majesty of Ye Are Gods can streamed in its entirety here. Tastemaking website Invisible Oranges fittingly states that they “just can’t decide if they are kvlt or just creepy.”

Due to the elaborate packaging, the release date for Sabbath Assembly‘s Ye Are Gods has been adjusted to September 28th for Europe and the UK (through Svart Records) and October 5th for North America (through The Ajna Offensive).

As on the critically acclaimed Restored to One debut, released in 2010 by The Ajna Offensive, Ye Are Gods presents the hymns of the Process Church of the Final Judgment, a religious movement that emerged in the late 1960s as an apocalyptic shadow-side to the flower power and New Age movements.

Reaching beyond the scope of Restored to One, Ye Are Gods incorporates the ritual text and structure of the Process Church’s highest and holiest mass, the “Sabbath Assembly” liturgy from which the band is named.

Ye Are Gods is led by vocalist Jamie Myers, a veteran of Hammers of Misfortune (The Locust Years) and Wolves in the Throne Room (Diadem of 12 Stars, Malevolent Grain). Dave “Christian” Nuss remains drummer and co-producer.

The album features Genesis P-Orridge serving the role of High Priest(ess), aka “Sacrifist,” Eyvind Kang plays viola for the liturgical “Declaration of the Gods,” and guitarist/vocalist Imaad Wasif offers a chilling rendition of the hymn We Give Our Lives. In addition, Timothy Wyllie, an original Process Church member, provides a homily from Process Church founder Robert DeGrimston’s Gods on War. Mr. Wyllie is the author of Feral House’s LOVE SEX FEAR DEATH, which offers an insider’s perspective of the Church and its true leadership.

The album offers a first-ever glimpse into the Process’s most sacred liturgical text, taking the astute listener through the mysterious Gnostic journey of the unification of Christ and Satan; the bliss of total submission to the gods Jehovah, Lucifer, Satan, and Christ; the wilds of the Apocalypse and a face-to-face encounter with the Angel of Death; and finally the moment of spiritual renewal in which the Process’s “Law of the Universe” is revealed.

The influential Process Church opened chapters in London, Europe, and across the USA, dressing in black cloaks and walking the streets with German Shepherds. To promote their controversial theology, they sold intricately-designed magazines, three of which are documented in full-color reproductions in the recently issued Propaganda and Holy Writ of the Process Church of the Final Judgment (Feral House/Ajna).

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Sabbath Assembly – Ye Are Gods

Posted in CD, Rock with tags , , , , , , on 2nd September 2012 by mariadodarmata

Sabbath Assembly
Ye Are Gods

Released: Fall 2012
Devotional Rock

Released Via Anja Records / Svart Records

 

“We are the servants of GOD, no less.” With this phrase starts Sabbath Assembly’s latest creation.

As soon as I started listening, a flashback to the years that my mum, as a good catholic, made me go to church; a chant, a priest talking and then a lady with a guitar playing some song. Logic says that because of this connection I’d absolutely hate it, but the music is incredibly pleasant.
After the first whole listen what came to me was “a mix of hippie rock with Gregorian chants”, especially has this hippie bong fire round feeling.

In terms of lyrics, the songs are based on hymns of The Process Church of the Final Judgment, so if you are no familiarised with this cult, it might be a little confusing. Overlooking that fact, the music is incredibly engaging and exciting. I am most definitively not the flower power/praise out Lord Jesus type, but there is something fascinating about them.

Throughout the album, a story about the four main characters (Christ, Jehovah, Lucifer and Satan) is narrated. Form their love/hate relationship to the effects of them in our lives. The story of the apocalypse and the new beginning is told and a terrible character is introduced to us (for the second time, I believe): Abbadon, both villain and sort of unsung hero. The mix of church organs with heavier instruments added up to the constant listening of the names Christ and Satan make his one of the most interesting things your ear will ever have the pleasure to listen to.
With interesting messages and beautiful melodies, Sabbath Assembly created a gift to our senses. Hopefully y will give this album a try so you and discover its full beauty.

4/5

María Mata

Interview: Sabbath Assembly

Posted in Interview with tags , , , , , , , , on 26th August 2012 by mariadodarmata

Sabbath Assembly, formed in ‘09, are the modern response to a religious movement known as The Process Church of Final Judgement. The band have a unique sound, merging several different and contrasting styles of music together, from church organs to heavy guitars and choir vocals. Maria managed to have a quick chat with the band from her lemon pledge related duties.

Maria: How did Sabbath Assembly start? What inspired you to start this project?
Sabbath Assembly: I met Timothy Wyllie, an original member of the Process Church, at a book expo in NYC when he was promoting his book about the Church; Love Sex Fear Death.  Looking through his book I was struck by the plates of sheet music of hymns of the Church. Timothy explained that the songs had never before been recorded because they were thought of as liturgical rather than popular. I offered that perhaps now was the time to bring this music to the world, and thus we both hatched a plan at that moment to share the hymns on a wider scale.
M: Do you think you had some sort of “divine inspiration”?
AS: I wouldn’t be so bold as to say that, but I often question what has come over me such that I feel such an uncompromising zeal to pursue this project so relentlessly.  It doesn’t feel as if this is the story of my life, yet it is somehow slowly becoming so.
M: Who did you hope to reach with your music? How has this been received by listeners? Have you gotten any feedback?
AS: I think the question is, “who does the music hope to reach?” and I am not sure that answer.  As of now there don’t seem to be many boundaries in place.  So far we have felt overwhelmingly positive feedback from the metal scene, even though the music is not exactly metal.  Metalheads are not afraid of the dark forces, so we feel this is the reason for the kinship.  Our impression is that the message is coming into the world at the correct time.
M: What is “THE PROCESS CHURCH OF THE FINAL JUDGMENT”? Is it only a congregation or is it an organized church of its own?
AS: The Process Church of the Final Judgment was an organised church that began in the late 60s and survived into the 80s, passing through various forms.  It began as a post-Scientology group therapy and commune experiment that led to contact with the spirit world and a resulting theology that paired psychotherapeutic work with religious tenants that encouraged individuation, wholeness, and self-acceptance.
M: The lyrical the theme of your music is centralised on spiritual things, is this related to the faith you profess?
AS: Yes, the lyrics invoke the four deities Christ, Jehovah, Lucifer and Satan as aspects of ourselves that we are not to suppress but celebrate.  So our “faith” is affirming our complex and rich psychological tapestry.
M: Would you say you are trying to “evangelise” your listeners? Is it part of your goals as musicians to convert someone to a religion?
AS: Not exactly – our first draw to the music is that the words were meaningful for us personally, and then we discovered that the melodies are also quite beautiful, so why not share?  It is not an intention to convert, only for us as band members to perform music we can honestly believe in.  If this happens to be infectious on any level, we are of course pleased.
M: The album is musically varied and has many different sounds in it. How would you describe your music genre wise?
AS: Devotional.
M: You recently released a music video for “In the Time of Abaddon II”, that features various images that I assume are related to your cult or church. Do you have a specific message to be communicated by this imagery?
AS: Yes, the beginning montage contains some imagery related to the history of the Process Church, as well as issues of their concern, such as death and the problem of evil.  In the video this imagery is joined with the recitation of ritual text that prophesies the coming Apocalypse, which we feel is a relevant message for our time.  The Apocalypse can mean the end of the world; it can also mean transformation from one phase of existence to the next; it can also be understood on a personal level as our relationships, accomplishments, and ambitions come to fruition and pass away.
M: Is there anything else you would like to share with us?
AS: “For every end there is a new beginning, and if we are not of the End, then we shall be of the New Beginning.  Either we shall be the ashes of the Phoenix, or his resurrection from the ashes.  And if we care about the death of the Phoenix, then we shall be his ashes, but if we are detached and see the cycle of which his death is but a part, then we shall be his resurrection.
-The Process Church of the Final Judgment, As It Is, 1968

Sabbath Assembly premier video for “In The Time of Abaddon II”

Posted in News with tags , , , on 3rd August 2012 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

sabbath assembly 2012 - small

Today, Sabbath Assembly premiere the first video from their forthcoming second album, Ye Are Gods. Entitled In the Time of Abaddon II,this first glimpse into the magick & majesty of Ye Are Gods was originally streamed in its entirety but now takes visual shape under the direction of Jason Keenan of Cinders and Ash Media.

The video for In the Time of Abaddon introduces viewers to a cataclysmic onslaught of Processian imagery, past and present, as Genesis P-Orridge (PSYCHIC TV, THROBBING GRISTLE) narrates the impending doom of the Apocalypse according to text by Process Church founder Robert deGrimston. New vocalist Jamie Myers then offers a chant from the “Discourse on Abaddon,” an ancient Coptic scroll that reveals the history and purpose of the Angel of Death – Abaddon: King of This World, a source of terror, to whomevery person shall bow at the time of their death…no escape.

Sabbath Assembly‘s Ye Are Gods is set for release on September 21 through Svart Records (for Europe and the UK) and The Ajna Offensive (for North America).

As on the critically acclaimed Restored to One debut, released in 2010 by The Ajna Offensive, Ye Are Gods presents the hymns of the Process Church of the Final Judgment, a religious movement that emerged in the late 1960s as an apocalyptic shadow-side to the flower power and New Age movements.

Reaching beyond the scope of Restored to One, Ye Are Gods incorporates the ritual text and structure of the Process Church’s highest and holiest mass, the “Sabbath Assembly” liturgy from which the band is named.

Ye Are Gods is led by vocalist Jamie Myers, a veteran of Hammers of Misfortune (The Locust Years) and Wolves in the Throne Room (Diadem of 12 Stars, Malevolent Grain). Dave “Christian” Nuss remains drummer and co-producer.

The album features Genesis P-Orridge serving the role of High Priest(ess), aka “Sacrifist,” Eyvind Kang plays viola for the liturgical Declaration of the Gods, and guitarist/vocalist Imaad Wasif offers a chilling rendition of the hymn “We Give Our Lives.” In addition, Timothy Wyllie, an original Process Church member, provides a homily from Process Church founder Robert DeGrimston’s Gods on War. Mr. Wyllie is the author of Feral House’s LOVE SEX FEAR DEATH, which offers an insider’s perspective of the Church and its true leadership.

The album offers a first-ever glimpse into the Process’s most sacred liturgical text, taking the astute listener through the mysterious Gnostic journey of the unification of Christ and Satan; the bliss of total submission to the gods Jehovah, Lucifer, Satan, and Christ; the wilds of the Apocalypse and a face-to-face encounter with the Angel of Death; and finally the moment of spiritual renewal in which the Process’s “Law of the Universe” is revealed.

The influential Process Church opened chapters in London, Europe, and across the USA, dressing in black cloaks and walking the streets with German Shepherds. To promote their controversial theology, they sold intricately-designed magazines, three of which are documented in full-color reproductions in the recently issued Propaganda and Holy Writ of the Process Church of the Final Judgment (Feral House/Ajna).

As it is. So be it.