Archive for Celtic

Primordial w/ support – Porto, Portugal

Posted in Gig, Live with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on 22nd October 2018 by Pieni

Primordial, Basalto, Aura
Hard Club, Porto (PT)
21st September 2018
Promoted by Notredame Productions

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One month yesterday and the memories still send shivers down my spine. Primordial’s songs already have that effect on their fans, but something about that night’s performance made them more enthralling. I always thank the promoters for allowing me the chance of shooting these gigs but this time my heartfelt reverence towards Carlos Freitas and Notredame Productions goes deeper, for bringing such show to us.

DSC_0067 copyBut first things first. Post black metal Aura, promoting their debut EP “Hamartia”, which had been released in July. Aggressive, but bearing the somberness of a doom band, the mix works out extremely well, the four musicians really “into it” when on stage. For what I could gather, “Your Eyes Can Sweat My Desire For Catharsis” is their strongest track. An extra note on the bass player’s professionalism, as the piece on the bass that holds the strap broke but he didn’t stop playing; he just put his foot up on one monitor and held the instrument on his knee. I can only imagine the strain on his back and arms while doing it. In the end of the song he fixed it with duct tape, but since their songs are over 6 minutes long, consider my hat tipped.
https://www.facebook.com/oficialauraband/

Then came the 99%-instrumental Basalto. In fact, the first I’d seen them, a few months prior, I’d say they were an instrumental act. But this time, on the first and last track, guitarist António Baptista growled something indecipherable.
The final product is labelled as stoner/doom metal, but it’s achieved with a variety of other elements, such as jazz and blues, making it a lot spicier, more spirited. “Doença (“disease” in Portuguese) is their second album, released in February, and according to them, it represents everything black or dark in Humanity’s intellectuality. Interesting concept.
https://www.facebook.com/basaltostoner/

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In +25 years of attending concerts, I can only remember three concerts that went on for two hours: Iced Earth (the “Horror Show” tour, which coincided with the release of the boxset “Dark Genesis” and so the band decided to play a little bit of their full discography so far, with three different stage sets); Queensrÿche (the “Operation: Mindcrime” 20th anniversary tour where they performed both the album and its sequel in full) and Moonspell (the 20th anniversary of “Irreligious”, where they also played the whole DSC_0272 copy“Wolfheart” and “Extinct” albuns). Primordial was now the fourth, but the first without any special reason for it, apart from “not being like one of these new bands who play for an hour and go home” (quoting Nemtheanga himself). You’ve probably done the math by now: more time to play, less key-songs left out of the set, even if they have to insert new ones out of the latest “Exile Amongst The Ruins”. Plus, if you know how charismatic Nemtheanga is, you know how intense every minute of a Primordial show can be; 120 of them is something just beyond words.
Nemtheanga recalled several times their first show in Portugal, 20 years ago, praising “his friend” José Costa for it, and also mentioned the last time they’ve played at Hard Club (although that gig happened in the original venue, on the other side of the river, but that he didn’t seem to remember). Such sweet nostalgia, brought on not just by the older songs…
From “Nail Their Tongues” to “Empire Falls”, going through “To Hell Or The Hangman” or – my all-time favorite – “The Coffin Ships”, this concert was a roller-coaster ride of emotions that will hardly be forgotten by any of the presents.
https://www.facebook.com/primordialofficial/

Text & photos by Renata “Pieni” Lino

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Darkest Era to tour the UK in September

Posted in News with tags , , , , on 24th June 2014 by Pieni

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In support of their new album “Severance” (released in Europe on 13th June via Cruz Del Sur Music), Celtic masters Darkest Era will play the following shows across the UK:

25/09/2014 – Birmingham, Scruffy Murphy’s
26/09/2014 – Manchester, Sound Control
27/09/2014 – Glasgow, Classic Grand
28/09/2014 – Leeds, Library
29/09/2014 – Sheffield, South Sea Live
30/09/2014 – Bristol, Exchange
01/10/2014 – London, The Garage

“We toured the UK twice around the last album and had a great time. We made loads of new friends and we can’t wait to hit some of the same cities and see some familiar faces. We’re really looking forward to seeing how the new stuff goes down live and we’ll be working hard between now and September to make sure each show is completely killer”, says guitarist Ade Mulgrew.

The day before the European release, the Northern-Irish band posted a new video for the track “Beyond The Grey Veil”:

Check out also the lyric video for “Sorrow’s Boundless Realm”:

www.darkestera.net
www.facebook.com/darkestera
www.twitter.com/darkestera
www.youtube.com/darkesteraofficial
www.cruzdelsurmusic.com

Cryptic Age announce new flautist as addition to the line-up

Posted in News with tags , , , , , on 16th June 2013 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

York’s premier prog. Celtic metal band Cryptic Age have announced the addition of new flautist and backing vocalist Shendie to their line-up. Cryptic Age are also currently working on their next release – Details to be announced.

Cryptic Age online:

http://crypticage.co.uk
http://facebook.com/crypticage

 

Celtachor sign with Trollzorn Records

Posted in Featured, News with tags , , , , , , , , , on 11th March 2013 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Irish black metallers, Celtachor, who recently shared the stage with Heidevolk in York, have penned a deal with Trollzorn Records. Formed in 2007, with a finalised line-up in 2010, the Celtic metal band have gone onto share the stage with top folk metal names like Alestorm, Skyforger, Heidevolk and Waylander, amongst others. Blending together influences from black, death and doom metal, as well as traditional Celtic medleys, Celtachor firmly established themselves as one of the top bands in Ireland’s underground metal scene.

Celtachor’s debut album, Nine Waves From The Shore, was released in November 2012 but is now available from Trollzorn’s online shop, at this location. The band’s next release will be out towards the end of 2013 and will be released through Trollzorn Records.

 

Interview: Celtachor

Posted in Interview with tags , , , , , , , on 26th September 2012 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Before their epic Celtic-sounding set at Warhorns Festival, Valkyrian Music editor Nico Davidson was able to catch Irish black metallers Celtachor for an interview where they discussed the band’s upcoming new album, Irish mythology and films.

Celtachor will also be supporting Heidevolk at Fibbers, 23rd February 2013. For more info and tickets, click here.

Waylander – Kindred Spirits

Posted in CD, Metal with tags , , , , on 7th June 2012 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Waylander
Kindred Spirits
To Be Released: 16th July
Folk Metal/Celtic Metal
Released via Listenable Records

Waylander have been influencing and pillaging the folk metal scene since their formation in 1993. The last 19 years has seen the band release two demos and three albums, with the fourth album, Kindred Spirits, to be released in July (unless you’re unlucky enough to be living in North America, then you’re waiting until August).

The album kicks off with Echoes of the Sidhe, which has an appealing introduction, being composed of melodic tin whistles and snarling guitar riffs. The vocals are astringent and unrelenting, adding to the vicious sound of the guitars and drums while the flute medleys add a more harmonious effect to the song. The guitar solo and the folky section that follow have a very defined, august sound. Lámh Dearg begins with a beautifully played acoustic section before the roaring guitar riffs make themselves heard. The acoustic sections are quite dominant throughout the song, creating a unique sound with the more heavier sections of the song and the harsh vocal work. Some of the melodic licks and riffs are pleasant to hear, giving the song a very varied sound. Twin Fires of Beltine begins sounding like a semi-heavy power metal anthem with Celtic influences. Compared to the last two tracks, Twin Fires is relatively more laid back, portraying more of a Celtic hard rock sound than a folk metal sound. The melodic use of tin whistles add a certain beauty to the song whilst the cleaner vocals in the chorus add some folky flavouring to the track. The most interesting part of the track is the combination of narration and an instrument I can’t quite recognise.

Of Fear And Fire teases the listener with a slow and dark acoustic passage before the menacing and fierce riffs echo through the speakers. The first vocal passage sounds like an early Gorgoroth before taking on the death metal guise. The tin whistles blend in majestically with everything else in the track. Grave of Giants bewitchingly soothing melody whilst the monologue speaks of beautiful landscapes and untainted rivers, far from the “over-populated, polluted and so-called civilised” cities. The following track, A Path Well Trodden, changes the pace and sound rom the last track into something more hostile and warlike yet alluring and statuesque at the same time, however, the tin whistles are the one part that really do stick out in this magnificent painting of sounds. The album steps up a few levels with the heaviness in the form of Quest for Immortality, a song that utilises a staunch use of both harsh and clean vocals with a charming use of tin whistles and barbaric drum patterns. The guitars combine a near-perfect use of melody and aggression that dances well with the tin whistles.

The haunting sound of Erdath gently rings out next, complete with almost-choir like vocals and a dark atmosphere, before the sudden transformation into a raging beast of double bass drums, energetic riffs and thunderous vocals. Of course, the track is full of aggression and speed as there is a section in the second half where it remains heavy but is relatively slower and gloomier, much like a doom metal track. The album ends with the title track, Kindred Spirits, which begins with an alluring tin whistle medley before the assault of guitars and drums begin. The vocals sound raw and much more harsh than on the other tracks, which I think really does add to the sound of the song. The tin whistles add the beauty to the beast that are the guitars and vocals, making the song harmonious yet chaotic – In the good sense of course. Kindred Spirits really is the stand out track of the album.

After listening to the album, I see why Waylander are an influential band. I’ve never really listened to the band before so Kindred Spirits was something new for me and it definitely displays Waylander’s sound perfectly. Everything just seemed to fit together in the album to create a folkin’ masterpiece and Celtic goodness.

5/5

Nico Davidson

Celtachor – In The Halls Of Our Ancient Fathers [2010]

Posted in CD, Metal with tags , , , , , , on 21st June 2011 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Band: Celtachor
Album: In The Halls Of Our Ancient Fathers
Release year: 2010
Genre: Celtic Black Metal

Celtachor formed in the early, wintery months of 2007, combining a mixture of folk, doom and black metal. They have slowly been on the rise in the Irish underground metal scene with their uniquely told version of Irish mythology and other great legends and stories of Ireland. “In The Hall Of Our Ancient Fathers” is the recent addition to their on going saga.

The tribal-like sounds of “Nemed’s Wake” eerily makes itself heard with dark, droning choir-like vocals creating a grim and terrifying atmosphere. A symphonic piece of epic proportions shortly follows, making way for the next track “Rise of Lugh”. The first riff is lacking in speed but has a clear black metal sound. The tempo increases with the vocals and drums entering the fray. There are clear Celtic influences in some of the flute medleys, adding a very legendary mystique to the music. The vocals are raw, untamed and savagely good. Some of the riffs are very crushing and brutal.

”In The Halls Of Nuada” comes next, beginning with a Celtic medley before the demonic onslaught of guitars, vocals and drums. The guitars and drums seem to be lacking in power compared to the vocals, which dominate the track viciously. In certain sections, the riffs are very choppy and whilst the drums seem more barbaric. “A Warning To Balor” blasts its way next with more of an eighties styled rock section which oddly works well with the more aggressive screams. There are a few melodic licks on this track as well. A masterfully played bass riff introduces the next track “Riders Of The Fomor”. The guitar riff that follows is mediocre and weak sounding. The Celtic styled medleys make a return on this track, adding a beautiful sound to the aggressive riffs. The vocals sound more raw and bloodthirsty.

“The Sons of Tuireann and the Blood Fine” is the second to last track, which calmly starts with an enchanting flute medley. The guitars join in soon after, twinning well with the flute. The vocals are still going strong, raw and murderous sounding, fortunately. The drums are sounding more powerful and beastly on this track as well. The final track “The Wavesweeper” begins with an intro similar to the first track, though the riff that follows seems poorly composed. The track improves with the introduction of the vocals, however, bringing a brutal assault of black metal. It is certainly one of the more violent tracks and perhaps the best one.

Celtachor are slowly becoming masters of their trade. “In The Halls Of Our Ancient Ancestors” is a brilliant mixture of Irish sagas, black metal and Celtic influences. If the ancient tribes of Ireland listened to metal, then this would certainly be that they’d approve of.

5/5

Nico Davidson