Archive for Valkyrian Music

Mørktår release details about new album Dark Years

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , on 25th April 2014 by Nico Davidson

London’s prophets of misanthropy Mørktår have recently revealed the details of their new album Dark Years since is set for release in winter, later this year. The themes surrounding the new album, like previous releases, will deal with misanthropy. The album, which will be the band’s debut album, features new lyricist and vocalist Repktkor and promises to deliver more than Mørktår’s demo releases. The tracklisting is as follows:

I. Happiness No Life
II. No Efficiency In Your Blood
III. Worse Than The Plague
IV. Loneliness Is All You Have
V. Painful Dark Death
VI. Dark Years
VII. Lifekut Misery

Mørktår will also be appearing at this year’s Valkyrian Festival in Bridlington. Weekend and day tickets are available from this location.

Mørktår online:

http://facebook.com/morktarofficial

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Interview with Martijn Westerholt [Delain]

Posted in Interview with tags , , , , , , , , , on 25th April 2014 by Nico Davidson

Valkyrian Music editor Nico Davidson catches up with Delain’s founding member and main man Martijn Westerholt in Manchester before the band’s first UK show of 2014 with Within Temptation.

Special thanks to April Mccaffrey for filming the interview.

Delain online:

http://delain.nl
http://facebook.com/delainmusic

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Epica announce one-off UK show as part of European tour

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , , , , on 23rd April 2014 by Nico Davidson

Dutch symphonic metallers Epica are set to embark on the first leg of their European tour in Winter this year, in support of their upcoming album, The Quantum Enigma which is set for release on 5th May 2014. The new album will be released via Nuclear Blast. Frontwoman Simone Simons comments:

After a little break from touring, we can’t wait to be on stage again and perform the new songs along with the old. Europe here we come!

As part of the European tour, the band will be hitting The Forum in London for a one-off UK show this year! Tickets are available from this location. Dagoba are the support act on the European tour.

Epica online:

http://epica.nl
http://facebook.com/EPICA
http://twitter.com/EPICA
http://YouTube.com/EPICA
http://instagram.com/EPICAOFFICIAL

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Sakara premieres new music video

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , on 21st April 2014 by Nico Davidson

The Queen of Ravenheart Records, Sakara has unveiled her new music video for the song Weave My Web. Taken from her second, upcoming studio album, the song and video give a glimpse in the musical landscape that awaits the listener during in Beauty And Bravery. The album is set for release around the time of the summer solstice, later this year. The video for Weave My Web can be viewed down below.

Sakara online:

http://ladysakara.com

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A Hero A Fake – The Future Again

Posted in Review with tags , , , , on 3rd August 2012 by underthenorthernstar

A Hero A Fake
The Future Again
Released July 2012
Post-Hardcore
Victory Records

Allow me to start off by saying that I cannot stand Post-Hardcore. I regard it, along with a multitude of various other Kerrang-cover-adorning subgenres as whiny, mindless, poseur dribble. Listening to such scene bands is about as fun as bathing in napalm and then going for a roll in a lovely salt pit. Regardless, I have listened to A Hero A Fake (missing a semicolon there, lads) on their new album, “The Future Again”, and you get to read my thoughts on the matter. How very lucky.

Well, speaking positively, the production isn’t bad. The instruments are clean-sounding, and everything is well enough mixed. This is probably due to the band being instantly marketable to the hordes of scene kids that follow such music, so the label will have splashed out on a nice studio. And fair play to them, it does sound nice on that front.

But OH MERCY. Breakdowns. Breakdowns everywhere. The default “let’s be all heavy hurrdurr” breakdown makes a stunning appearance on this album. But EVERYWHERE. All is standard, chug chug guitars, China cymbals and quick bursts of double bass… nothing new, whatsoever. It just sounds repetitive, not to mention gob-smackingly unoriginal. What makes it worse is that in places, this is accompanied by the most painful-sounding, horribly generic “shout-along” lyrics… And on that note, I must say, the lyrics in general? Good Lord. It was painful. I’m sure, if this sort of thing is your cup of tea, then they must be very meaningful, but honestly? It just sounds childish to me. Not at all helped by the absolutely pathetic vocals… from what I can hear, they appear to have two vocalists, one of whom does a fairly decent scream, but the other does one of the most pitiful sounding “loud talks”. I can’t call it anything else, because he just sounds like he’s talking loudly the whole time. It’s interesting to note that when all the “Metal” press began to slate Metallica and Lou Reed’s “Lulu”, the same kids who love this music hated it. But the vocal style sounds very very similar, and is based around an Identical idea. It sounds horrific.

The artists themselves are skilled. Yes. They have the ability to play their own instruments, and do so well. But then again, it should be expected of a band to do that. Writing good music is where real talent lies, and I’m afraid there was absolutely nothing here of any particular artistic merit. For example, Quorthon couldn’t really sing, and most of the songs Bathory wrote are not particularly technically complex. But that music was brilliant, and Bathory stand out, because their songwriting was immaculate. A Hero A Fake are EXACTLY the same as every other band of their kind, and will be forgotten by next year, having ridden on the crest of what is currently fashionable, and then drowned in an ocean of mediocrity and terrible songwriting.

I’ve heard nothing today to change my opinion of Post-Hardcore, ad if that’s what you enjoy, then sure, go and spend your money on this. You’ll be delighted, because it’ll sound exactly the same as every other band you listen to, and we wouldn’t want anything different, would we?

Just don’t get annoyed when I spend MY 12 quid on something that won’t make me want to burn out my ears with my own stomach acid.

1/5

Alasdair Dunn of Norderobring

XIII – North Of Nowhere

Posted in Review with tags , , , , , on 12th July 2012 by Nico Davidson

XIII
North Of Nowhere
Due For Release: 21st July
Thrash Metal/Yorkshire Metal
Self-Released

North of Nowhere - Copy

XIII – a number that’s been associated with ill luck and evil since the Code of Hammurabi, which apparently had the 13th law omitted – are a thrash trio hailing from Hull, East Yorkshire. Originally a four piece act, the band parted with one of their guitarists earlier this year and decided to continue as a trio. The rather nihilistically titled North Of Nowhere is the band’s debut album.

The aptly named Triskaidekaphobia (which means a fear of the number thirteen) kick starts the album with a fast paced guitar section before an assault of thrashy goodness blasts through the speakers. The vocals are more on the shouty side of things, though don’t take that to be a bad thing as they suit the fierce use of riffs and drum patterns rather well, especially during the chorus. Speaking of the chorus, the band utilise an adept use of licks between the vocals during the chorus. The solo disappointed me, as I felt it didn’t have that raw, callous feel or sound that I’m used to, having seen XIII perform on more than a few occasions. The radio voiceover that follows towards the end of the track adds a post-apocalyptic essence to the album that skillfully leads into the next part of the album; Breaking Point. I found the song to be not as energetic as the opening song but more aggressive than a bulldog chewing on a wasp (I realise that’s not a pleasant thing to imagine but I assure you, I mean it in a good way).

Retribution is surprisingly a relaxed composition, beginning with a subtle use of cymbals and epic guitar medleys and gentle, caressing vocals before evolving into a punchier piece with harsher vocals and staunch riffs. Like Triskaidekaphobia, Retribution ends with a radio voiceover, only this one carries on into The Longest Day, a song with as much bite as a zombie apocalypse. The vocals and riffs bounce off each other, while there’s a use of more chilled riffs and medleys in other sections of the song, keeping a certain diversity within the sound. Fahrenheit’s introduction sounds rather weak, lacking certain elements to keep the pulse of the music from dying out. The use of radio voice overs during the music makes it feel like some sort of post-apocalyptic or post-nuclear war world while the vocals keep the song modern and the guitars bring about a grim sound.

Down N’ Out takes up a callous, old school thrash sound with dashings of more adventurous stylings and influences whilst the vocals sound rather much like the Beasty Boys, in a strange yet enjoyable way. The Beaten Path has a unique introduction, beginning slow and august-like creating a cold, nihilistic feeling that resonates from the music and vocals. The song is almost sludgey in its style and composition, not that there’s any complaints coming from me on that matter. Unlucky For Some, the bingo calling for the number 13, sounds like an energy drink has been added to the album as the tempo has increased dramatically compared to the song track, as has the level of violence in the music. The solo really stands out on the track, taking on a life of its own whilst staying true to the song.

North Of Nowhere is definitely one of the best tracks on the entire album. The song balances a violent nature with nihilistic embraces and brutal sounds. Eclipse has a unique sound, beginning with the sound of people possibly rioting followed by a hard, thrashing rock influence. The vocals shine through the music, with the music emphasising them, while the music in its own right has its own distinct sound as well. Fuckin’ Scum is one of my favourite tracks by XIII and always keeps me happy when they play it live, so I’ll admit I was more than pleased when I found it on the album. The vocals, like one of the previous songs, take on a Beasty Boys style, only more angry and violent, like a bulldog that’s about to rip off your arms. The riffs range from slow and vicious to faster ad heavier, making it an addictive track to say the least.

When God is Gone… The Devil Takes Hold… is definitely the one track truly void of any hopeful feelings. Despite it’s faux-gentle beginning, the song is an explosion of different musical stylings and lyrics generate the feeling of failing hope whilst avoiding turning into some dodgy emo song. Some of the riffs and vocal sections are very poignant and stay with you long after listening. The album comes to an end with Forever, which is also the 13th track on the album – Nice to see they keep the concept of 13 flowing through. The song itself is different from the rest of the album, making use of soft vocals, piano and guitars as well as a guest appearance by Pastel Jack frontman Neil Bailey, whose vocals accompany XIII’s frontman Dan’s vocals superbly well, like a well trained choir. The track has a chilling embrace to it that is echoed through the piano. Forever ends with the last radio voiceover of the album.

XIII have created a strange but adventurous album in the form of North of Nowhere. Where as I expected to find a purely thrash-only record, I was greeted by different sounds that did much to entice the ears; from Beasty Boys-like vocal work to violent and destructive riffs and drum work. For the most part, the album was more enjoyable than any regular thrash album and I can see a bright future in the world of metal for XIII.

4.7/5

Nico Davidson

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Pantheon of Blood – Consociatio Solis et Lunae

Posted in Review with tags , , , , , on 19th June 2012 by underthenorthernstar

Pantheon of Blood
Consociatio Solis et Lunae
Released: 13th December 2011
Black Metal
Glorious North Productions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pantheon of Blood are a three-piece Black Metal band, originating from Finland. “Consociatio Solis et Lunae” is their second release, after their 2010 demo.

First off, the production on this EP leaves a fair amount to be desired. It doesn’t quite lend itself to the poor quality of early black metal EPs that made them more intense, but nor does it achieve a clarity that would significantly improve it. It’s not TERRIBLE, but a lot seems to be lost in this muddy work, particularly most of the drumwork and any bass.

What instantly strikes me, as soon as “Crimson Empress of the Night” begins, is that they have misjudged their guitar tone for their clean section considerably. It seems like a poor man’s attempt at the bleakness of an early Primordial track, with a distinct lack of the soul or subtle brooding that makes the latter so successful. Once the actual Black Metal begins, it improves. The songwriting for the EP is solid enough, with progressive influences dropping in, a time change here, a tempo shift there. More of it would probably be better. The riffing seems solid, if unimaginative throughout.

I feel that the band has skill, but makes too many ill-informed decisions to be great. Aside from the truly abysmal artwork, the Laughing and clean vocals towards the end of “Crimson Empress…” are probably intended to create a sense of insanity and evil, but they just end up being cringeworthy. The guitar solo going on at the same time as this seems somewhat irrelevant as well. Another significant point is that the B-side, “Overflowing Manifestation”, improves significantly in its latter half. Where its beginning was messy and overcrowded, it ends with what seems to be the aim of the whole EP; an expansive, bleak and engaging mood. The inclusion of much-improved acoustics over the traditional BM-tremolo picking and subtle group vocals it what there needs to be far more of in this band.

Pantheon of Blood end up being just fairly unremarkable with this. I don’t feel particularly drawn in, nor particularly excited by what they’ve showcased. If they continued in the vein of the very end of the EP, I would be far more interested, but as it is it seems they have a long way to go.

1.5/5

Alasdair Dunn of Norderobring

Dragonforce – The Power Within [2012]

Posted in Review with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on 17th April 2012 by underthenorthernstar

Band: Dragonforce

Album: The Power Within

Release Date: 15/04/2012

Genre: Extreme Power Metal

Label: Electric Generation Recordings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This Review is dedicated to the memory of Vadim Pruzhanov’s Hair. RIP.

It’s been 4 years since the release of the last Dragonforce album, “Ultra Beatdown”, shortly after which singer ZP Theart left. It’s been a fairly brutal 4 years for the London-based Extreme Power Metallers; a new album in the works, a GARGANTUAN world tour freshly completed, and the singer, beloved of the fans, is gone? Surely, a bell tolling death for most bands? Not Dragonforce. Since footage of “Cry Thunder” was leaked, having been filmed by fans watching the band support Iron Maiden, I have been far more than enthralled. As for new singer Marc Hudson, I could hug the man. He is everything ZP was and more, and his entrance has injected huge amounts of life into the band once more. The songs are far more varied in structure, and thus make for a much more enjoyable listen, but every single one still manages to soar to the octane-guzzling heights of Glory of previous albums.

“The Power Within.” There could not be a more appropriate title. The whole album is overflowing with POWER. Herman Li and Sam Totman’s epic guitar shreddery is prominent in everything the band does, their mastery being an album’s worth of an air guitarist’s wet dreams. Drums are utterly insane; while restrained on tracks like “Cry Thunder”, the 220 bpm monster of “Fallen world” (fun fact: Dragonforce’s fastest ever song, beating “Cry of the Brave” at 215 bpm) shows off Dave MacKintosh’s insane skill. There are even a couple of moments where Bassist Fred Leclerq gets to show off his talent in several extreme bass passages. And one Mr Vadim Pruzhanov (God rest his hair) is one of the greatest musicians to ever mangle a keyboard. Wizardry is the only way to describe it. But Marc Hudson’s vocals are ridiculously good – he far surpasses the expectations of any of the fans, many of who would, in normal circumstances, be winging and pining for ZP. He has stupendous amounts of talent, and with layered vocals, he sounds positively majestic.

One of the main criticisms of Dragonforce with regards to previous works was that “all the songs sound the same.” It was often insisted that they relied purely on technical ability to make interesting songs, and that was included in every song. This is not a criticism that has any grounds on this album – the songs have for the most part been shortened to be more digestible by the listener (most previous songs were around the 7 minute mark), and not every song is a hyper-speed blast to the end. “Seasons”, “Last Man Stands” and “Cry Thunder” are all fairly different to the usual Dragonforce way, but in no way unwelcome. Songs like “Die by the Sword” also mark a return to the Lyrical style of fantasy, swords and battles, not seen truly since 2003’s “Valley of the Damned.”

This album… blew me away in a way I’m quite sure most of the albums released this year will fail to do so.  All the apprehension is gone, and we should welcome the new Dragonforce with open arms. Utterly, utterly stunning, utterly, utterly brilliant.

5/5

Alasdair Dunn of Norderobring

From The Depths Compilation Track Listing Finalised

Posted in News with tags , , , , , on 16th October 2011 by Nico Davidson


The track list for From The Depths, which will be available for free download on 17th October, has now been finalised. The compilation will feature tracks by The Obscene, Windrider, Aloeswood, Cryptic Age, Escape From and many more from the international underground music scenes. The compilation will also feature an exclusive, currently unreleased track by Lancastrian metal outfit Wolfthorn. The track list is as followed:

1. ESCAPE FROM – Oni
2. THE DOSADI EXPERIMENT – Predestination For The Labyrinth
3. BLODRAVN – Words Of The High One
4. AONIA – Gift Of The Curse
5. CELTACHOR – In The Halls of Nuada
6. WINDRIDER – Hall Of The Slain
7. BAALBERITH – God that Never Was
8. WOLFTHORN – Light The Beltane Fires
9. REPULSIVE VISION – Force Fed Acid
10. EINHER SKALD – Drinking In Valhalla
11. CRYPTIC AGE – On The Bare Cold Ground
12. HER DARK EMBRACE – Flatline
13. GÜRZ – Göç
14. PASTEL JACK – Trojan Horse
15. ZIYOS – Ascension
16. FOREVER AND A DAY  – Heebeegeebees
17. MORLICH – A Throne in the Darkness
18. THE OBSCENE – Embrace Oblivion
19. ALOESWOOD – Nostalgia
20. NORTHSONG – Mountains Of Madness
21. THECITYISOURS – Ghosts
22. DEFORMATION OF MAN – Dust & Sound
23. HRAFNLBLÓÐ – The Battle (Of Teutoburg Forest)

Valkyrian Festival Receives Sponsorship

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , , on 22nd September 2011 by Nico Davidson

The Macmillan fundraiser event known as “Valkyrian Festival” is now being sponsored by Viking crafts online store Asgard Online, the Viking metal-wear specialists. Valkyrian Music editor Nico Davidson [Real name Nick Taylor] had the following to say: “We’re extremely grateful that Asgard Online have chosen to sponsor the event and it’s exciting that our first event has received sponsorship”.

Asgard Online will also be donating two t-shirts that will be used as prizes in the raffle at Valkyrian Festival.

For more information regarding Valkyrian Festival, click here.

Asgard Online have also organised Tyr’s first ever UK headline show. For tickets, go to: http://www.asgardonline.co.uk/

Interview: Graeme Farmer [2011]

Posted in Interview with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 27th June 2011 by Nico Davidson

Nico sits down and has an exclusive interview with Graeme Farmer of Lancastrian black metal outfit WOLFTHORN to discuss the up-and-coming album and other things.

Nico: Greetings Graeme. Thanks for taking the time to speak with us today. The band [Wolfthorn] recently stated on their official Facebook that there’s a full length album in the making. How’s that going for you guys?

Graeme: Cheers mate, thanks for the opportunity to chat and for showing interest in the band! The album is coming along very nicely, thanks. The bulk of it was recorded in Lancaster during the first few months of 2011. At the minute I’m just re-recording some of the lead and acoustic guitar parts at home, and adding small things like keyboard tracks. After that, it’s just a case of mixing and mastering etc, so with any luck it will be released by the autumn. It contains a mix of brand new songs and songs that have been a staple of our live shows for some time, but which were not recorded for the EP. The title of the album will be The Cold Descent of Eternal Winter. I’d say on the whole that it will be a darker, heavier and more progressive record than Echoes was, with the lyrical content continuing to focus on the people, places and events that helped shape the history of the British isles. There’s also a couple of nature-inspired tracks, which is something we haven’t touched upon much before.

N: In regards to the keyboard sections on some of the tracks, will some of the tracks be more symphonic heavy or will the keyboard sections just be there for a more atmospheric effect?

G: They’re there to add atmosphere to the tracks primarily. We don’t have a keyboard player in the band, so we were very conscious that if the keyboard tracks were too prominent the songs would sound totally different when we came to perform them live. We used some synth tracks in Twilight in Valinor and Sworn in Blood on the EP and felt they worked quite well, so they’ll appear in a few more songs on the album, but they’re very much there to thicken out certain riffs rather than to become a dominant element in the song.

N: That’s good then. When the album is out, do you all plan to tour in support of it or just play a big release show in Lancaster?

G: That depends if people in other towns want to see us play! We haven’t played much outside the north west as of yet, but that’s certainly something we’re looking to change. There will almost certainly be some sort of release show in Lancaster though, and I imagine the ale will be flowing! Playing live has been difficult this year as I’ve been living a long way away from the rest of the band and working a job that involves working evenings, so our show at The Flapper in Birmingham on July 30th will actually be our first gig of 2011! But I’m moving jobs in a few weeks, and I’m hoping to be in a position to move back to Lancaster soon, so if all goes to plan so should be able to play live a lot more often before too long. Playing live is by far the most enjoyable aspect of being in a band, so for me personally it’s been something I’ve missed doing a lot these last few months.

N: On the note of live music and gigs, how would you describe the music scene in Lancashire? Are there any bands you’d recommend people to see? Aside from Wolfthorn, obviously.

G: Lancaster always surprised me in that for a small town it has a very large and varied music scene. There are a number of pubs in the city centre that regularly put on live bands, and people in general are very enthusiastic about music. I’m talking music in general here, and not specifically metal. We often see people at our shows that you wouldn’t expect to be into extreme metal, and I’ve always been really impressed by people’s willingness to support local music regardless of genre or style. There’s also a large music scene in nearby Preston that’s worth mentioning too. In terms of bands from the area I’d suggest to others, there are a couple that spring to mind. Firstly, our guitarist Andy would be extremely unhappy if I didn’t use this opportunity to plug his other band, Consecrated Flesh. You owe me a pint if you’re reading this mate! They play a more extreme form of black metal than Wolfthorn, incorporating influences from German thrash bands like Kreator and Sodom. They released a new demo a week or two ago, which is well worth checking out. They’re a band that have come on a lot in the last few years, and are well worth seeing live as well. Their guitar player Will is actually responsible for the recording and mixing of the upcoming Wolfthorn album! And secondly, as a massive fan of traditional Heavy Metal and the NWOBHM sound in particular, I’d highly recommend a local band called Eliminator who are probably my favourite band from the area. Wolfthorn’s first ever gig was opening for them back in 2008, and they’re well worth checking out if you’re a fan of bands like Heavy Load, Gotham City and Sortilege.

N: You mentioned earlier that the upcoming album will be focusing on events and people in British history that helped to shape said history. Is there any reason particular reason for this or is it just one of those things that just happened while writing the songs?

G: Believe it or not, when I started the band I was going for a sort of “grim and frostbitten” vibe and we had songs about Satan and Elizabeth Bathory and stuff like that! It didn’t last long though, as I realised it was totally insincere and unconvincing. History is something that I’ve always been interested in, and I spend a lot of time reading about ancient Britian, so it just seemed the logical thing for me to write about. So we kept some of the riffs and stuff from the original songs, but I totally redid the lyrics with this new theme in mind, and it seemed to work a lot better. I think lyrics always come out better when the subject matter is something their author has an interest in or feels strongly about, and that certainly proved to be the case for us as the quality of our lyrics improved dramatically! I think with this kind of music the lyrics are extremely important, so I’m pleased to be able to stand behind my lyrics rather than have to perform some contrite, cliched black metal nonsense that I feel no connection to. But I suppose you and our other listeners will be the judge of whether or not that early change of direction worked!

N: At least you broke away from the cliché that a lot of black metal bands get trapped in. Throughout the time Wolfthorn has been around, have you or any of the other members been accused of ridiculous antics like “goat sacrifice” or “devil worship” based on the music? Or is it something you fear will happen when the band gets bigger?

G: Haha, not yet I’m afraid! We’ve had a few strange emails from nutjobs in America accusing us of being a racist band and ridiculous things like that, but that happens to a lot of bands that sing about heritage and history these days. It’s a shame that some people jump to conclusions like that, but you just have to ignore it really. As a band we have absolutely no political or religious agendas, and while our lyrics do refer to “British” heritage and identity, this is not intened to convey a sense of superiority over other people, racially or otherwise. We are proud of where we come from, and write songs about periods of history we are interested in, but that’s as far as it goes. Criticism like that is not something that’s ever really bothered me though, if anything I’m pleased that people in America have heard our music, even if they totally missed the point of it! There’s no such thing as bad publicity I guess. Haters gonna hate!

N: It’s good to see that there are bands that keep politics and religion out of the music. Speaking of other countries, are there any countries you’d like to tour in the future when the band has a larger, more international fan base?

G: It’s not something I’ve ever thought about to be honest. If that were ever to happen, I’ve never left Europe in my life so I suppose it’d be cool to visit places like the USA and Canada or Australia and New Zealand. It’d be really cool to play in places like Germany or Scandinavia where Heavy Metal music is still a mainstream force. But that’s all in the future if it ever happens at all, for now I’d quite like play the rest our own country! We’ve never played in the south of England, and we haven’t done Wales, Ireland or Scotland yet either, so we’ll probably try and tick those places off before we start leading the jetset lifestyle!

N: Just a few more questions now. In terms of your writing, aside from history, what influences you the most?

G: A variety of things really. History, along with mythology and folk legends, as you mentioned, is definitely the main influence lyrically. There are a few exceptions, however. Twilight in Valinor, from our EP, is about JRR Tolkien’s epic The Silmarillion. I’m quite proud of the lyrics in that one as I managed to rhyme two Elvish words! Aside from that, there are a few songs on the new album inspired by nature and the countryside, as well as one track that touches on some more personal themes. Musically, I have a wide array of influences. When the band formed the main influence was definitely Dissection, and they continue to be a big inspiration, although I always wanted to incorporate things like guitar solos and twin lead sections from the more traditional Heavy Metal that makes up the majority of my record collection. Whilst writing the second release, I was listening to a lot of Swedish death metal, particularly the record Silence of the World Beyond by A Canorous Quintet, so expect to hear that influence come through more strongly when you hear the album! Most people describe Wolfthorn as black metal with NWOBHM influences, which I suppose makes sense as that is essentially the sound I’m trying to create with my songwriting.

N: They’re certainly some impressive influences. Once again, thank you for your time. Final question now… Aside from the next album release and the Birmingham gig, what else is the band planning for the rest of the year? Any underground festivals or gigs elsewhere in the UK?

G: We’re playing a show in Lancaster on October 28th, which we’re quite looking forward to as it will be our first hometown show since November of the previous year. I would imagine that there will be some kind of release party whenever the album comes out too, which would also be in Lancaster as well. Other than that, there’s nothing else planned, but we’re always open to offers, so if anyone reading this likes our stuff and wants to book us to play their town, don’t hesitate to get in touch! Cheers for talking to me anyway mate, it’s been fun. Best of luck with your website, and hopefully I’ll see you at a Wolfthorn show in the future and we can have a pint together!