Archive for Sony Music

Bring Me The Horizon – amo

Posted in CD, Rock with tags , , , , on 22nd January 2019 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Bring Me The Horizon
amo
Released January 2019
Hard Rock/ Electro-rock
Released via Sony Music/RCA Records

01-343969

Hailing from God’s Own County of Yorkshire, Bring Me The Horizon return to the forefront with their latest album, amo. With an ever changing sound, Bring Me The Horizon have become one of the biggest acts to come from South Yorkshire, gaining themselves admirers and haters from all across the globe.

I Apologise If You Feel Something starts up the album with a hypnotic electronic medley and soft, almost-choir like vocals that build up to the electro-rock vibes of Mantra. Mantra has plenty of hooks to keep the listener engaged, as well as energetic riffs and some very memorable vocal lines. Nihilist comes in strong with a dark pulsing rhythm, and catchy melodies. The softer vocal duet between Sykes and Grimes suit the track well, dancing elegantly with the lashing synths and shadowy beats.

In The Dark stands out with its laid back pace and notably fetching riffs. Wonderful Life is one of the singles from the album. The track itself is interesting but doesn’t sound as strong as the rest of the album. Sykes’ are admirable throughout the track and stand out more than the guest vocals of Dani Filth. Ouch acts as interlude between the last track and the next one, appearing more as a chaotic whirlpool of differing beats with the odd vocal section thrown in.

Medicine bounces back from the previous two tracks, with medleys and riffs that one can quite easily dance to. Sugar is a track that employs satisfying hooks and active vocals that meld almost perfectly with the rhythm section. Why You Gotta Kick me When I’m Down sounds almost like a hip hop track due to the mesmerising beats and whippings of electronic sections but the vocals show that it is very  much a Bring Me The Horizon track.

Fresh Bruises has an emotive atmosphere radiating from its introduction before the spellbinding electro-like percussion kicks in, carrying the otherworldly vocal sections. The keyboard passages in Mother Tongue stand out valiantly, weaving all other parts of the song together into a majestic composition. Heavy Metal is an interesting song all on its own, turning heavy with synth-laden movements and vocal duets from Sykes and Rahzel.

amo finishes on a very orchestral orientated note with I Don’t Know What To Say, contrasting the grandoise sound of classical instruments with soothing vocals, acoustic guitar, and hints of electronic influences.

amo makes it clear that Bring Me The Horizon are still on top of their game, blending different styles into their music. While it might be as heavy or as aggressive as their older albums, it shows how far the band have come since their early days, and it clearly demonstrates the band’s versatility and talent.

4.5/5

Nico Solheim-Davidson

Hardcore Superstar – HCSS

Posted in CD, Rock with tags , , , , , , , on 28th April 2015 by Pieni

Hardcore Superstar
“HCSS”
Hard rock
Released on 22nd April 2015
Via Gain Music

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Been struggling with the right words to write this for more than a week now. Is it a good album? Pretty much so. Do I like it? Not really. It’s far from the first time that I acknowledge the greatness of an album, even if that particular genre of music isn’t my cup of tea. The issue here is that Hardcore Superstar is one of my favorite bands and it’s hard to leave my personal disappointment out of the way.

First and foremost, “HCSS” lacks edge. The riffing is still heavy, but not vibrant, and it’s now more accurate to mention a “cheesy vibe” than a sleazy one. “Don’t Mean Shit” is probably the only song that still carries the Hardcore Superstar spirit of the last five albums, and maybe the reason why it’s the opening track – a passage between the past and the present. A very retro present. Nothing against the traditional hard rock of “Party ‘Til I’m Gone” (even though I prefer my rock less classic), but the dreamlike, nearly-psychedelic moments are too much Summer-of-the-drugs for me. But one might find those the cherry on top of the cake, the one detail that makes all the difference.

The rhythm in “The Cemetary” embraces another ‘70s facet, sounding just like The Clash’s “London Calling”. It gains a bit more spirit in the chorus, becoming really lively (no pun intended) and catchy. It’s a good song, but something I’d expect from the “No Regrets” era and not the Hardcore Superstar of today. In fact, now that I think of it, there’s a lot of that album and “Thank You (For Letting Us Be Ourselves)” in here. A bit twisted and revamped, but here. Guess music does run in circles.

I don’t know if any of the guys is a Procol Harum fan, but “Fly” surely feels like it was inspired by the English band. A classy melancholy that goes on for almost eight minutes and which will either delight you or bore you – there’s hardly a middle term. As for the groovy/funky “Touch The Sky”, I would go for “delight or annoy” – especially those verses in the beginning of the song, where you don’t understand a thing of what Jocke’s singing. Once again, one may consider that a touch of genius. Me, I’m not convinced.

I do like “Glue”, and once in a while the chorus of both “The Ocean” and “Off With Their Heads” pops happily in my head. But still… As a reviewer, I must congratulate Hardcore Superstar for their diverse and rich songwriting. As a fan, I confess I was expecting something else.

4/5

By Renata “Pieni” Lino