Archive for Sarah Jezebel Deva

Old Corpse Road confirmed to support Hecate Enthroned at Bridlington show

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , on 13th December 2013 by Nico Davidson

British folklore-inspired black metallers Old Corpse Road have been confirmed to support Hecate Enthroned at their first show in East Yorkshire in over three years. The show will take place at Basement in Bridlington on 17th May 2014 with more support acts to be confirmed. Tickets are available for £6 from this location.

Old Corpse Road online:

http://oldcorpseroad.co.uk
http://facebook.com/oldcorpseroad

Hecate Enthroned – Virulent Rapture

Posted in Review with tags , , , , , , , , , on 12th December 2013 by Nico Davidson

Hecate Enthroned
Virulent Rapture
Released 25th November 2013
Symphonic Black Metal
Released via Crank Music

Anyone know follows the British black metal scene will have no doubt encountered the legendary, if somewhat unsung, heroes of the scene: Hecate Enthroned. Following the release of Redimus in 2004, the band have remained fairly quiet – or as quiet as you can possibly get when playing black metal. However, following their recent pact with Italian label Crank Music, Hecate Enthroned are set to rise again.

The eerie orchestration of Thrones Of Shadow acts as the beginning of the ritual that is Virulent Rapture. The haunting orchestration leads into the fierce wailing guitars and bestial vocals, as the keyboard passages create a Poe-like atmosphere that glides gently between the crushing use of guitars, bass and drums and the hate-flavoured vocals. Unchained sees the waves of Plutonian darkness continue to flood forth from the snarling guitars and hypnotic keyboard medleys whereas the bass and drums are more thunderous and barbaric, creating a perfect contrast.

The introduction of Abyssmal March creates an atmospheric mood, painted with varying Cimmerian shades but the unrelenting charge of the heavier instrumentation rushes in, leading a vicious use of screams and Hadean keyboard medleys. Plagued By Black Death features a melancholy piano passage which dances like a spirit at dance macabre with the vocals and guitars in a certain, almost seductive manner portraying beauty and a bestial nature in one vessel. Euphoria explodes in like a volcano, domineering one’s hearing with a visceral assault of guitars and drums and some heavy punches from the vocals. The guitars whip out melodic passages, which are accompanied by a mystifying layer of orchestration.

Virulent Rapture is a flood of guitars on a biblical scale of proportions, leaving nothing but a path of ruin and devastation – and probably some sore necks as well – in its wake. The hypnotic orchestration does little to sooth the destructive nature of the song, in fact, it enhances it in a dark and ethereal manner. The one calm during in the storm is produced by the haunting guest vocals of Sarah Jezebel Deva who adds an enchanting element to the song. Life comes across as more of a gothic doom anthem, lending an obsessive, memorable and augural sound through the shadowy voices of the guitars and illusory keyboards. The stern use of bestial vocals do contrast away from the music, employing a strong black metal element there.

The alarming riffs of To Wield The Hand Of Perdition leave no room for mercy as they tear their way through the song like wolves hunting their prey. The vocals are formidable at each turn, while the rhythm sections made up by a terrifying assault of drums and bass, alongside the keyboards, strengthen the track. Of Witchery And The Blood Moon, a title that rings true to the band’s name, is somber in its presentation, painting an image of an unrelenting arctic winds, leaving only a cold trail of wintry enchantments. Immateria is a break from the fierce snapping of riffs, lyrical war cries and barbaric percussion assaults, taking the listen sailing down a more gentle river of memorable medleys until Path Of Silence unleashes a storm of deathly riffs and vocals sharp enough to cut steel in two. The percussion and bass falls down heavier than a ton of bricks, finishing off the devastation left by the previous tracks. The keyboards and orchestration finalise the black metal incantations, keeping the band’s signature sound unscathed throughout the chaos.

Raise your horns and bend your knees. The kings of British black metal, Hecate Enthroned, have returned with a masterpiece that has not only become a complete evolution of their sound but proves that they are one of the best bands on the scene and they certainly show no signs of abdicating from their throne just yet.

Nico Davidson

5/5

Hecate Enthroned online:

http://hecateenthroned.com
http://facebook.com/hecateenthroned

 

Hecate Enthroned post new song online

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , on 20th November 2013 by Nico Davidson

With the impending release of Hecate Enthroned’s latest masterpiece, Virulent Rapture, on the horizon, the legendary black metal coven have posted a track from the album to YouTube as a teaser, so fans can get an idea of what to expect from the new album. The song can be heard below.

The song, To Wield The Hand Of Perdition, is a completely new direction in the band’s career, focusing less on the symphonic melodies – though they do remain –  and more on a crushing assault that will render one’s ears bloody.

Hecate Enthroned online:

http://hecate-enthroned.co.uk
http://facebook.com/hecateenthroned

 

Virulent Rapture available for limited edition pre-order

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , on 28th October 2013 by Nico Davidson

Virulent Rpature, the new long awaited album from unsung black metal legends Hecate Enthroned, is now available for pre-order but is limited to 100 hand numbered copies that will include an A3 poster and the Hecate Enthroned flag. Pre-orders can be made at this locationVirulent Rapture will be released on 25th November via Crank Music Group.

Virulent Rapture tracklisting:

Thrones Of Shadow
Unchained
Abyssal March
Plagued By Black Death
Euphoria
Virulent Rapture (feat. Sarah Jezebel Deva)
Life
To Wield The Hand Of Perdition
Of Witchery And The Blood Moon
Immateria
Paths Of Silence

Hecate Enthroned online:

http://facebook.com/HecateEnthroned

 

Interview with David Homer [Apparition]

Posted in Interview with tags , , , , , on 31st January 2013 by Nico Davidson

Created 16 years ago by David Homer, Apparition have sailed through the UK’s underground scene, supporting more well-known acts such as ReVamp, Delain and Sarah Jezebel Deva.

With a performance coming up at The Dames of Darkness Festival and their recent album released through Ravenheart Music, David Homer, bassist for Apparition has a chat with Valkyrian Music’s Nico Davidson.

Nico: Your album For Vengeance… And For Love… was released recently, what are the main concepts on the album?

David: They are just different stories sang to music. No real concept except maybe ‘freedom’.

Nico: How does For Vengeance… And For Love… differ from previous Apparition releases?

David: Well, I was the only person on this album that was on the debut Drowned in Questions. The songs on For Vengeance are a lot heavier, better production because we took more time and I did the keyboards on all but two of the songs. I visited this keyboard player called Adam a few years ago and by watching him picked up tips on how to be creative with the keys instead of just playing simple chords. Thankfully, he is in the band now.

Nico: You’re playing the Dames of Darkness Festival in May. How are you feeling about that?

David: As we are hosting the show I am just hoping it all works out and that the bands and fans leave happy with good memories. If it is a success we might do others.

Nico: I understand you’ve shared the stage with Delain in the past. Are you looking forward to sharing the stage with them again at Dames of Darkness?

David: Yes because when we played with them the first time I didn’t really know them or their music. When I watch them this time it means the day is nearly over and I can relax.

Nico: How would you say that Apparition differs from the other “female-fronted” bands on the scene?

David: We are classed as symphonic metal and goth metal and we use live keyboards and not backing tracks like most bands both big and small. I feel there is enough creativity in the band to show that we don’t need orchestras or choirs. Not to say I don’t like bands that do have these parts because I do but it’s just not for us.

Nico: How would you describe your music to a potential fan?

David: If we jammed without vocals and keyboards we could be seen as a Metallica type band. By adding Sakara’s [Apparition‘s new frontwoman] wonderful singing and Adams keyboards we give the music atmosphere and feeling.

Nico: Apparition have played a number of different shows, some of which have been in support of acts like Sarah Jezebel Deva, ReVamp and Tarja Turunen. Which show would you say was the best one you’ve played?

David: My favourite show by far was with Sarah Jezebel Deva in Liverpool. We were really tight and had so much energy that night. The Tarja show was good because we played in front of many people and it was good to meet the lady herself.

Nico: Aside from the aforementioned Dames of Darkness Festival, what other plans do the band have for 2013?

David: We’re going overseas to play again. Last year we played at Angels Rock festival in Belgium with Azylya and ExLibris which was very cool. Before that we need to work hard at practices with new guitarist Nick and hopefully new drummer Alex.

Nico: What’s the meaning behind the band’s name, Apparition?

David: There isn’t one, it just sounds right for a gothic kind of metal or rock band.

Nico: Excluding yourselves, which band from the UK would you say are the best on the current British metal scene?

David: I am not saying this because we toured with them but I really love Sarah Jezebel Deva‘s band because they have great songs. Each night after we played I would still enjoy watching them even after ex amount of shows. Also Saturnian, a symphonic black metal band we played with at the Liverpool show were amazing. Everyone who knows our then guitarist Owen will tell you he never shuts up  BUT he was quiet for about the 30 minutes that they played. At first we thought he had gone to the lap dancing club next door but nope, he was transfixed!

Nico: Thanks for your time, David. I look forward to seeing you all at Dames of Darkness in May.

You can follow Apparition at these locations:

https://www.facebook.com/apparitionband
http://www.myspace.com/apparitionworld

 

First bands announced for Valkyrian Festival 2013

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , on 23rd January 2013 by Nico Davidson

Once again, Shades Nightclub in Bridlington will play host to Valkyrian Festival on Friday 29th and Saturday 30th November and Sunday 1st December. The event, organised by Valkyrian Music editor Nick Taylor – who is better known by his pen name Nico Davidson, aims to raise money, this year, for RapeCrisis.

Confirmed already for the three day event are British melodic metallers Nya who have been making a lot of noise down south. With two EPs already under their belt, as well as a headline performance on the Doghouse Stage at Download 2011 and an appearance coming up at this year’s Metal Days Festival in Slovenia, the band are ready to raise hell for charity. Nya frontwoman Anezka commented, saying: “It’s a privilege to be playing this years Valk-Fest, joining a line-up of great bands to support RapeCrisis, a truly great cause. So prepare yourself for a hard hitting wall of metal and don’t forget to buckle in for the ride! See you there! Nya.”

Joining Nya on the second day of the event, will be Yorkshire doom-death outfit Narcotic Death. Having formed in 2007, the band have gone onto gain infamy in the Yorkshire area for their unique blending of Yorkshire-styled doom and death metal, which has led to their music being described as “the soundtrack to Paranormal Activity”. Narcotic Death’s vocalist Alex commented: “We look forward to bringing our brand of terror to such a worthy cause and what will be an exceptional festival.

Also, confirmed alongside Nya and Narcotic Death is the UK’s finest folklore-orientated black metal overlords Old Corpse Road. The five-piece outfit have written a dark and brooding legacy over the years they’ve been on the scene and have taken their heathen anthems to some of the UK’s premier festivals such as Bloodstock, Warhorns and Metieval. With a vast collection of mystifying compositions, it will be witching hour at Valkyrian Festival when Old Corpse Road take to the stage.

And for fans of bands such as Nightwish, Sarah Jezebel Deva and Delain, Worksop-based operatic metallers Aonia will also be returning to the Valkyrian Festival stage. Described as “England’s answer to Finland’s Nightwish and Sweden’s Therion”, Aonia are excited to be bring their own unique style to Valkyrian Festival.

Valkyrian Music have also organised a Battle of the Bands where the winning band earns themselves a slot at the festival. The single round BOTB will take place on Saturday 27th April at Shades Nightclub, Bridlington. Confirmed to compete so far are Lipstick Sunbeam, Seconds Apart and Fallen Angel. The winning band will determined by the audience and tickets will be available on the door for £2.

Weekend tickets are available for pre-order via Valkyrian Music’s BigCartel store and are priced at only £5 each (excluding postage and packaging) and for those who like to keep the party going, there will be an after party each night at Shades Nightclub which will be free for all ticket holders (£1 for non-ticket holders). The after parties will be DJ’ed by resident DJ Steve Hall, who plays only the best in rock and metal and to sweeten the deal, there will also be give aways and raffles at the event.

There is also an active JustGiving page set up to help raise money before and after the festival. The JustGiving page can be found at this location.

Updates and further information can be found at the following locations:
http://facebook.com/ValkFest
http://twitter.com/ValkFest

Nya’s latest EP, Drivin’ The Nails In, was released 5th November and is available from their BigCartel store.

Narcotic Death are also taking pre-orders for their upcoming album Dies Irae, which can be pre-ordered from their BigCartel store along side their new line of t-shirts.

 

Valk-Fest venue change plus final line-up details

Posted in News with tags , , , , , on 4th October 2012 by Nico Davidson

Shades Nightclub in Bridlington will be the host for this year’s Valkyrian Festival, following the closure of The Lamp in Hull earlier this year. The annual event, organised by Bridlington-based webzine Valkyrian Music, is in aid of UK charity Autism Plus.

Valkyrian Festival will take place on Friday 23rd and Saturday 24th November, with doors on the Friday night opening at 6pm and at 2:30 pm on the Saturday. Bridlington’s own deathcore titans in the making Sea Of Giants will headline the Friday night, with support from Riff-X, Illflower, Dead Pools and Gloomlurker, whom supported ex-Cradle of Filth backing vocalist Sarah Jezebel Deva, earlier this year in Grimsby.

Saturday will be headlined by Birmingham prop-power metallers Dakesis, who supported Edguy earlier this year and played an exclusive acoustic set at Bloodstock back in August. Joining them, as main support will be Ziyos and fresh from Bloodstock’s New Blood Stage, will be Hull’s premier misanthropic black metal outfit Infernal Creation, who blasted their way through Bloodstock this year on the New Blood Stage, along with special guests Sanguine,whom rocked Download back in June. North-west metal bands Nitronein and Shades of Avalon will also be joining Dakesis as supports, along with female fronted operatic metal outfit Aonia who will be playing a rare and exclusive acoustic set. Engraved in Blood and Organized K-Hos will be completing the line-up for Saturday, as well Apparition, who will be playing with their new frontwoman, following the break after their tour with ex-CoF backing vocalist Sarah Jezebel Deva.

Weekend tickets are priced at the low, low, low price of £4 and are available here. Day tickets will be available on the door. All proceeds will go to Autism Plus (Register charity no. 518591). The event is all ages, with alcohol available from the pub above the venue.

Poster designed by Dark Creative 32.

Ragnarok set to release new album in October

Posted in News with tags , , , , , on 11th September 2012 by Nico Davidson

The anticipated new album from Norwegian black metallers Ragnarok will be released on October 30th in Europe and UK and November 6th in North America through Agonia Records. Cover artwork, tracklist, and album overview are available below.

Malediction is the title of Ragnarok‘sbrand-new album (Anyone who mistakes it for Sarah Jezebel Deva’s EP will lose major kvltness). When it comes to Norwegian black metal, Ragnarok is one of the outstanding examples of what integrity and perseverance can bring to the genre. Since their inception at the beginning of 1994, the band has outlasted a multitude of variations and trends within the metal community that sought to influence the black metal genre. Eschewing avant-garde, nu-metal, and even hardcore influences, the band remained true to themselves and to the traditions of black metal, whilst at the same time growing as writers and performers and refusing to become stale. Today, after 18 years in the business, Ragnarok still play black metal in the classic style and continue to significantly increase their fanbase, having become internationally recognised exponents of the genre, with six albums and high-profile festivals and tours under their belts. With this seventh full-length album, the groupdeliver the best there is in terms of dark and aggressive music. Ragnarok does not need to re-invent the wheel – they just improve it.


Malediction
was recorded, mixed, and mastered by Devo of Marduk‘s fame at Endarker Studios.
The new album will be available as jewelcase CD, digital download, and limited vinyl with exclusive bonus track. First 100 copies will be available on handnumbered brown vinyl. It can be pre-ordered here.

Full-scale European, US, and South American tours are planned for late 2012 and early 2013, including festival appearances. The band has already confirmed to play at Metal Legacy Festival (Saturday 27 October – Stromstad, Sweden) and to headline Messe des Morts Festival(Saturday 24 November – Montreal, Canada; first North American appearance of the band). More news to be announced shortly.

Malediction tracklist:

1. Blood of Saints

2. Demon in my View

3. Necromantic Summoning Ritual

4. Divide et Impera

5. (Dolce et Decorum est) Pro Patria Mori

6. Dystocratic

7. Iron Cross – Posthumous

8. The Elevenfold Seal

9. Fade Into Obscurity

10. Sword of Damocles

11. Retribution**

**exclusive vinyl bonus track

Tristania one off UK show

Posted in News with tags , , , , on 18th July 2012 by Nico Davidson

Tristania will break off from writing the follow up to 2010’s ‘Rubicon’ album for a tour of Europe that takes in one UK show in London at Underworld on September 17, 2012. Tickets are available here.

Vocalist Mariangela Demurtas comments: “We’re still in song writing modus, but when this opportunity came along, we simply couldn’t refuse. Tristania thrive on the road and the last few tours have really seen the band reach our highest ever levels in terms of live performance. This should also be a mouth watering tour package for many people around Europe, so we were more than willing to have a few week off the songwriting in order to participate.”

They’ll be joined by Sarah Jezebel Deva, Kells and Soundstorm.

Gloomlurker – Realm Of Swallowed Souls

Posted in Review with tags , , , on 4th July 2012 by -Scorpius-

Gloomlurker
Realm of Swallowed Souls
Released – June 2012
Deathened Doom Metal
Self Released
 

Gloomlurker are a 5 piece Death/Doom Metal band from Grimsby, who formed in January 2012 and despite only having been formed less than 7 months ago they have impressively played with some great bands such as, Sarah Jezebel Deva, Severed Heaven and Infernal Creation.

Their E.P Realm of Swallowed Souls starts of with a track called, Bungalow of horrors, which initially kicks off with a death metal feel to it but as it progresses through the song it becomes more doom metal.

As the track continues it becomes quite repetitive and predictable and it doesn’t really blow you away with any kind of stunning guitar work, it is quite apparent that the band are far more doom metal orientated than the aforementioned death metal.

The second track, Scarlet Whispers, starts off with a standard open chorded jangle on the guitar which is pleasant enough to listen to and then the drums kick in, after that the song is in full doom metal drone with yet more unimpressive and repetitive guitar, bass, drum and vocal work.

Track three which is titled, Mask of Fortitude, is a drastic improvement on the first two tracks of the E.P!

It starts with a rather meaty, chunky guitar riff reminiscent of a lot of death metal bands and then it kicks into the song with yet again more doom metal styled riffage, it is a track that you could happily have on when working but I wouldn’t put it on if your expecting something heavy to mosh to.

Next up is the track, Crypt Crooks, which like track two on the E.P starts off with a pleasant open chorded guitar jangle and then as with the second track the drums kick in and the doom metal drone starts once again. The track itself I find very repetitive and I wouldn’t really want to listen to it on a regular basis.

The last track on the E.P is a cover of Nirvana’s song, Breed, wow!

What a drastic change and for me an improvement, this song you can actually get into and the band cover it pretty well. The vocals on this track are split into two, one clean and the other the familiar scream, the clean vocal is out of tune and doesn’t really work, however on the plus side the scream vocal on this track sounds great! If the track was all with the scream vocal I would much prefer it, this is by far the best track on the E.P in my opinion.

My overall thoughts on this E.P are, the mix itself isn’t quite right as I find the bass gets lost and the vocals are too deep in the mix, if the vocals were brought out more and had a clearer if not louder definition that would improve things drastically.

If you are a fan of death metal then this E.P is not for you, I don’t quite understand why the band have termed themselves as Death/Doom as they are far more doom than death, yes there are very fleeting instances of death metal but the overall speed and skill for that just isn’t there.

Considering the band have only been going 7 months this is a fair effort on their part and I applaud them on that, there is plenty more time to develop their sound and ideas for this band, personally I think they should drop the death metal label and just stick with being a doom metal band.

If you are into doom metal then you would be into Gloomlurker, I however am not a massive doom metal fan so this E.P isn’t really for me.

Overall the band have made a good effort and it does show but I do believe there is a lot of room for improvement and development.

2/5

– Scorpius –

Sarah Jezebel Deva–Malediction

Posted in Review with tags , , , , on 24th June 2012 by Nico Davidson

Sarah Jezebel Deva
Malediction
Released 28th May 2012
Symphonic Metal
Released via Listenable Records

virselis

Sarah Jezebel Deva is becoming somewhat of a household name in the darker netherworld of the symphonic metal scene and yet still somehow stays unknown at the same time, through no fault of her own. Malediction is the latest release in Sarah’s extensive discography and made its live debut during SJD’s UK tour back in May.

This Is My Curse is the starting point of the EP and what a way to start. The track unleashes some violent, extreme metal orientated riffs, along side some poetically performed symphonic sections. The drums adapt well to the ever changing sound of the song. The guest vocals, provided by Dani Filth, add a very grim and tragic sound to the track and it’s somewhat nostalgic to hear Sarah and Filth performing, vocally, together again – However, it’s Sarah’s vocals that really shine out the most.

The second track, Lies Define Us, which features Bjorn Strid (Soilwork) begins with a piano dominated section which works well with the guitars, before going into a vocal and piano section that really demonstrates the strength of Sarah’s vocals. Bjorn, surprisingly, works well, vocally, with Sarah. The guitars and drums feel more laid back throughout the song before still scream with some subtle extreme elements. The more obvious symphonic elements add a depth of character to the song, adding emphasis on both sets of vocals as well The final part of the EP, When ‘It’ Catches Up With You, seems to combine the best elements of the previous two tracks, excluding the guest vocalists. The symphonic references and extreme metal based riffs are ripe throughout the track, evolving the song into a masterpiece of powerful vocals and hypnotic music.

The sound that Sarah and her band create develops and evolves with each new release and Malediction is no different. I just wish it was a longer release, but nevertheless, Sarah Jezebel Deva has released yet another first class release.

5/5

Nico Davidson

SJD set to tour Europe with Tristania

Posted in News with tags , on 21st June 2012 by Nico Davidson

Former Cradle of Filth backing vocalist Sarah Jezebel Deva is set to tour Europe with Tristania in September. The tour is presented by Zillo Magazine and dates are as followed:

14th Sep, Holland, Bibelot, Dordrecht.
15th Sep, Belgium, Onair Studio, Mons.
16th Sep, Holland, Boerderij, Zoetermeer.
17th Sep, England, The Underworld, London.
18th Sep, France, Glaz art, Paris.
20th Sep, Spain , Tunk, Irun.
21st Sep, Spain , Carasol, Madrid.
22th Sep, Spain , Mephisto, Barcelona
23th Sep, France, Poste a Galane, Marseille.
25th Sep, Germany, Bastard club, Osnabruck
26th Sep, Germany, K17, Berlin.
27th Sep, Switzerland, Z7, Pratteln.
28th Sep, Germany, Nachtleben, Frankfurt.
29th Sep, Germany, Turock, Essen.

Sarah Jezebel Deva w/Support @ Yardbirds, Grimsby

Posted in Gig, Live with tags , , , on 23rd May 2012 by Nico Davidson

Bands: Sarah Jezebel Deva, Winter In Eden, Soulsphere, Gloomlurker
Location: Yardbirds, Grimsby
Date: 20th May 2012

Even though it was only a few months ago that Sarah Jezebel Deva had already toured the UK, it felt like it had been longer than that. This was the fourth show of the tour, though sadly missing Apparition due to reasons that I can’t remember. By the time I finished my interview with Sarah, the show had already begun.

As I entered the venue, I was greeted by a brutal wall of riffs and dominating drum work as the opening band, Gloomlurker, performed a staunch cover of Guardians Of Asgaard, in similar fashion to Amon Amarth. Apparently this was Gloomlurker’s first show though it was hard to tell if they were being honest or just joking as their death metal orientated set was well performed, making a good use of snarling guitars and monstrous vocals. The band’s sound was clear and defined, with a certain roaring distorted sound thrown into the mix. The one thing that let down this band’s set was the lack of stage presence, though, musically, they are a pretty solid outfit.

The Grimsby based blackened death metal sounding quintet Soulsphere, who looked a bit like a cross between Dragonforce and Slayer, proved to be just as brutal as the opening band, using in synch drums, tight riffs and demonic vocals. There were some tasty melodic riffs thrown into their set as well for good measure but it was their performance The Killing Call that stuck out the most in my opinion, with it’s thrash-meets-black metal sound and mosh-a-long energy. The band’s frontman proved to be a force to reckon with, both vocally and energetically, making for an interesting performance from Soulsphere.

Winter In Eden were the replacement for Apparition. I couldn’t help but think, when they began with their domineering symphonic sound, that their sound rings in a similar vein to Nightwish though the vocals weren’t very Nightwish sounding but they did add a certain melodic sound to the flawlessly played keyboards and differing riffs which ranged from symphonic metalesque to more classic rock based, especially in the last song of the set: Lies. The band had a certain atmosphere around them as they performed, which is an odd little way, helped to enhance their diverse sound. Winter In Eden‘s set is certainly one of the more memorable performances I’ve seen the past few years and they deserve a bit more recognition for their work and music.

A tense, somewhat dramatic mystique had took hold of the audience at Yardbirds as Sarah and her band made their way to the stage. One of the stand-out songs of Sarah’s set was This Is My Curse, taken from the Malediction EP. The song itself had a slight extreme metal sound to it, which matched Sarah’s vocals perfectly. The riffs sounded to be executed perfectly. The performance of A Matter Of Convenience felt more like a raging beast of riffs and drums, yet was justly performed like a well rehearsed dance recital. Even though Sarah stayed in the same spot for a lot of her set, she still managed to keep the attention of the crowd. Of course, the rest of the band put on a great performance as well, especially during The Corruption of Mercy, which despite being slower paced, still rung out with an epic sound that really did display the band’s talents, although it was I’m Calling that sounded and felt to be the perfectly performed part of the night. Either way, Sarah proved one thing, on Sunday night and that is that’s she’s a goddess on the microphone and her band, which consists of Ablaz, Dan, Azz and Damjan, are all just as talented as she is.

It was good to see Sarah perform in a more healthy state (the last time I saw SJD and her band, she was ill) and the support acts fit perfectly on the bill, despite the first two being more on the brutal and destructive side of music.

Nico Davidson

***Photography by David Ferret Taylor***

Interview: Sarah Jezebel Deva, Dan Abela and Damjan Stefanovic [20th May 2012]

Posted in Interview with tags , , , , , on 23rd May 2012 by Nico Davidson

I was fortunate enough to be able to catch an interview with former Cradle of Filth backing vocalist Sarah Jezebel Deva and a couple of her band mates at Yardbirds in Grimsby, where we chatted about music, the tour, mythology and ctaching flights to and from Endor on a goose’s back.

Nico: You alright guys? Right, my first question is the most generic question, and one I’m so sick to death of asking bands but how’s the tour gone so far?

Dan: Yeah. It’s gone great, actually. We’ve had three gigs so far, so it’s going alright.

Sarah: One cancelled.

Dan: Yeah, one cancelled.

Sarah: Because of the promoter, being a… Well, you know. All the promoters we’ve had so far have taken chances on us and been so lovely to us, they’ve helped us, they know the situation, they know how hard it is for all the bands out there, people taking chances, people not taking chances and some of the promoters have had us back like Rob from here [Yardbirds, Grimsby] and Sal from Whiplash Productions in Liverpool. They’ve had us before, it didn’t go successful before, but they loved it and seem to believe in us and that’s what we’re happy with. And the fans, they believe in us, they’ve supported us and what more could you ask for? Of course, being anally screwed everyday isn’t good but if it wasn’t for the niceness of the fans and the promoters.

Dan: Don’t stay at Travel Lodge. Use Premier Inn.

Sarah: Oh no, some of the Travel Lodges have been really, really nice.

Nico: Eh, moving on, your new EP Malediction is due for release at the end of the month [28th May], what would you say are the biggest influences behind it?

Sarah: Madonna. Prince. Boyzone. Serbian rap artist that I can’t pronounce the name of. Our influences? If I could answer this before you [Dan] say something stupid like Nightwish and…

Dan: I was gonna say Lacuna Coil.

Sarah: I actually don’t think our influences shine majorly through our music. We are predominantly into extreme metal. Apart from him over there who likes Beatles and Chas and Dave but we are predominantly a band that are into extreme metal and we try to let that shine through. We do not want to be the typical female fronted band. We try to make sure it’s not the typical female-fronted band. We don’t sing about dragons, butterflies, getting a flight from Endor on a goose’s back.

Nico: You’ve just pretty much described Nightwish’s lyrics there.

Dan: Over the hills and very far away.

Sarah: So, if I was going to say what our influences are on this album, mostly me and Dan wrote the EP but I would say our influences are just extreme metal and we don’t try to copy anyone. Though there’s going to be loads of people, because we’ve had Dani Filth on one track, "oh, it’s Cradle of Filth!" – No, it’s not. It’s SJD. Having Björn Strid [Soilwork] on one of the songs, it doesn’t sound like Soilwork but people are still gonna label you so, yeah, our influences are basically whatever happens happens.

Dan: I like black metal and I know you do too, Sarah, but I mean that’s the thing. It’s a funny old one, I would say it is predominantly like the old black and death metal scene.

Damjan: I think it depends on who writes the riffs, like the song with Björn on it, Dan basically wrote all the riffs for that.

Sarah: Actually that’s not completely true.

Damjan: Dan wrote of the riffs for that. Anyway, from my point of view on the drums, I’m not as into death metal as these guys are, so when I heard the riffs and stuff, it was more about listening to them and thinking "How am I going to make this feel and sound the best it could be? How am I going to make sure it’s not a repetitive thing over and over again? And when it changes section, how do I make sure each section stands out without having to over play it or over complicate it?".

Sarah: As he [Damjan] says, he’s not into the same type of stuff as us which is great because you have the diversity.

Damjan: There’s a bit of crossover but not as much. So for me, it’s just about writing stuff that’s going to sound memorable that I’d wanna listen to again and I think we managed that.

Sarah: And we’ve got to give the bassist, Ablaz, some credit as well. He predominately wrote When It Catches Up With You. Dan just made it sound better. No, not like that. Obviously when I come up with a song, like Silence Please and The Eyes That Lie, I present them to Dan and he changes a few bits, just like Damjan has produced a song, for the next album but we’ll change little bits to suit his playing and the way I sing and the way the others play. So we all contribute but up until recently, it’s been predominately me and Dan.

Damjan: I think that’s really to do with the line-up and it changing as much as it has.

Sarah: Yeah, the line-up has changed but as a band, and I know we’re totally straying away from the question now, but as a band we have totally gelled together. We just need to get Damjan into some good music.

Nico: Going back to what you’ve just been saying about the song writing, since you and Dan are the main songwriters, how does a song writing session go between you two? Do you go off into separate rooms and do your own thing or do you get together and jam?

Sarah: We write really well together. It’s a bit hard for me sometimes because I don’t play guitar. But when I’ve got a riff, I sing it to him and he spends a week working it out but me and him gel and it’s hard to break away from that when we know other people wanna get involved. It’s funny because we’ve had the argument before that no one gets involved and now they’re all wanting to get involved. It’s always relaxed, really, isn’t it?

Dan: Basically, all we do is go into the studio and start working. We always go in with the intention of writing a new song, it’s never one of those things where people say "oh yeah, phoned them in the middle of the night and told them I have an amazing riff". We always go in there and get our ideas together and present. We always do it in the studio, which I find helps because obviously I run it, so we just set up and get going.

Sarah: Legacy London Studios.

Dan: And that’s what good because we always put it from the point of view that we are going to play these songs live as well. We’re not one of those bands goes "let’s go do something that’s completely…" and then you can’t do it live. It’s what I hate, especially when you see certain bands and hear their albums and you think "Fuck me, that’s incredible!" but you know you’ll never hear it.

Nico: That’s true. Going back to what I was about influences earlier, where do you find the influence for your lyrics?

Sarah: Life, people, shit people, good people. I find it easier to write about shit people than good people because they’re really boring. All the shit experiences I’ve had in life, situations, circumstances, situations that have affected the people close to me. I’ve done a few kind of mythological songs, like Sirens and Silence Please. Silence Please is about a banshee, but you know, the evil banshee.

Nico: I thought banshees were always evil. If you look into the Irish mythology…

Sarah: Well, you’ve got the sirens of the sea, which are theoretically banshees as well, since they signify death.

Nico: I always thought the sirens were different to the banshees, with one being Greek and the other being Irish, unless I’ve got something mixed up.

Dan: Yeah, they invented the euro.

Sarah: Sirens lead sailors to the rocks, they use their beauty to lead them to their deaths. But yeah, there’s a few other songs I’ve written about mythology and fantasy. I’m Calling by Angtoria for example, I know this isn’t Angtoria but I’m Calling is about when I used to go into the bathroom and roleplay.

Dan: [suppressed laughter]

Sarah: Don’t laugh! You know like kids have imaginary friends, well I had an imaginary boyfriend who would whisk – Okay, this is what happened. Basically, instead of washing, I would have this thing in my head of this evil man feeding me evil pills and then this prince would ride up and save me from the evil guy. They were little fizzy kinda pills, could have been sterogen for false teeth, I don’t know but I swallowed. That’s what it’s about, just fantasising as a kid. But as I was saying, most of my lyrics are based on shit people, shit in life, bad things. I just cannot sing about good things, I find it very, very difficult. And I can’t sing about things I know nothing about either, like even, Silence Please – My bed use to be near the window and you know foxes make that – beautiful as they are are – make that horrible sound and it’s a scary fucking sound. And I read about banshees once and I was convinced that sound outside my window was a banshee. Used to scare the shit out of me. So, that’s what that’s based on, a nightmare and such. But yeah, I just write about things I know about. As I said, I can’t write about dragons and fucking Endor and…

Nico: So, basically you can’t do the whole Nightwish lyrical concept?

Sarah: I just can’t.

Damjan: I personally have never been into that, so I prefer this kind of thing.

Sarah: I just think you need to sing about what you know, I’m not saying I’ll never expand.

Damjan: I find as a musical listener, that’s the kind of thing you relate to more.

Sarah: And I’ve been very lucky, the fan connection has been phenomenal. The amount of people that come to me and who can relate to my lyrics. I’m glad I can do that. I’m glad I’ve lowered the suicide rate.

Azz: Going back to what you said about lyrics and singing about things you know about, I don’t see how anyone can put emotion and energy into anything that’s bullshit fantasy stuff anyway.

Sarah: Exactly, exactly. I think you need to connect with your audience and you know, a lot of my lyrics are depressing. Like, This Is My Curse is about the fur industry. And I was saying to Dan when I was writing the lyrics, I didn’t want it forced into people’s faces. Most people won’t know it’s about the fur industry, until you read it and see what Dani Filth contributed lyrically. These animals are raised and are treated like absolute shit and then skinned alive for fur, for fashion. And I would loved to have said that in a song but it doesn’t come across and it would have sounded crap. So, you have to find a poetic way to get your message across. And as I said, you gotta have feeling for that audience to believe what you’re singing about, that you have passion about your music. You have to really feel and know to get that message across and I think we do. I know these guys don’t write my lyrics but they know that I am quite a big person but take A Matter Of Convenience, that’s based on people who like to shag around.

Nico: Sounds like the population of Brid to be truthful… Anyway, moving on, you guys have been confirmed to tour with Tristania in Europe later this year. How are you feeling about it? Like going from headline tours of the UK to support act in Europe?

Sarah: Azz isn’t doing the Europe tour and it’s a bit of a sour subject, so he’s sitting out for this one but he will be doing everything else over here over us, which is as equally important but it’s a brilliant step for us because it goes up.

Dan: We’ve met them a few times before as well and we get on really well with them. So, that’s going to be on the things that’s cool about it is the fact that it won’t be strangers walking into the same room together.

Sarah: We just hope this is a step up for us. We’ve got some stuff going on in December and obviously the Female Metal Voices Festival in Belgium as well. We’ve had some amazing things go on this year but the last three weeks has obviously knocked some of us down. Me and Dan mostly, because we’ve put so much into it, that’s not to say no one else but because me and Dan predominately run as much as we can because other people have got other stuff going on. So, it’s affected us more, so hopefully what’s going on the end of this year will set us up for next year.

Dan: And you’re definitely going to see a big change for the next album.

Nico: Sounds good, sounds good. Right, this next question is for you, Sarah. Back in December, you announced you would be featuring on the new Cradle album: Midnight in the Labyrinth, which obviously came as a shock to a lot of us. How did that come about? Because obviously for a while you’ve said you wouldn’t be working again with Cradle of Filth.

Sarah: Nostalgia. I love the old Cradle albums, love the old Cradle songs. To be able to sing those songs again and because I knew it would make a lot of older Cradle fans happy. I thought it would be good for us. I think that me and Dani go well together, vocally.

Nico: Well, to be honest, in my opinion, I think Cradle’s sound, in the female vocals, has drastically gone down hill since you department. No disrespect to your replacement.

Sarah: There’s been a few.

Nico: Really? Why doesn’t anyone tell me these things?

Sarah: Well because it’s band lies. Like when we fire Damjan, it will be due to unforeseen circumstances but really, I don’t think any band really do tell the truth, I don’t think many bands tell the truth. I think some bands find it unprofessional to tell the truth but we try to always tell the truth because in the end you need a fucking good memory to lie. It’s lovely that a lot of people do think that but there’s probably are the same number of people who think I’m shit. But in my defense and I’ve said this in loads of interviews, when you’re just a backing singer in a band, you don’t have any rights and you can’t control how you sound and no one takes you seriously. I’m sure if you flick through YouTube, you’ll find lots of videos taken from mobile phones and other footage of me sounding like I’ve got my head up a cow’s arse. Some of it is atrocious, it’s because if you can’t hear yourself, you can’t pitch and that’s one of the reasons why I was glad to not be with Cradle of Filth any more because I’m a singer. It’s my life and I’ve spent fourteen years doing oohs and aahs and now I can prove I actually have a voice. Going back to do the Cradle album is no big deal and I enjoyed. I said nostalgia but there’s a lot of rumours going around that I’m going to join them. Would I go back? I’ve had this question with Dan, as in Dan Abela. If the circumstances were right, I would do some stuff. But at the end of the day, they also have to want me back. It’s got to be a mutual thing and for the right reasons.

Nico: Speaking of the rumours, I’ve had several e-mails from my readers and your fans, basically asking if there’s ever going to be the possibility of you doing  a tour or a one-off live show with Cradle sometime in the future. doing tracks from the albums you’ve featured on?

Sarah: I can’t answer that. Whatever will be, will be. Under the impression that they 100% don’t have a female singer and they’ve got Wacken coming up. I’ve said to Dani, if you want help, I will step in. Let’s see what holds. But this band comes first! I will not sacrifice anything for this band. This band comes first.

Nico: Going back to what you’ve been saying about Cradle, at the same time you announced that you’d be featuring on the next Cradle album, you said you’d be going back to work with Angtoria at some point in the future, so, what is happening with Angtoria at the moment? When can we expect something from Angtoria?

Sarah: I think again it’s a case of when it happens, it happens. Chris has a studio and he’s so busy working for other bands. We did try put a timeline of May on it but it’s just not gonna happen. It’s gonna be when it happens. I hope we have something by the end of this year. It will happen because me and Chris are close, we get on well and we’re on the same page. It’s the same kind of relationship as me and Dan. It’s really just a case of when it happens and I hope it does.

Nico: Well, I know a lot of your fans, my brother included, want it to happen. So obviously, there’s a lot of people looking forward to any news about Angtoria – Well, any good news about Angtoria. My next question is for you, Dan. Now, obviously you run your own studio, Legacy London, as a studio proprietor, producer and sound guy, how do you feel that home recording is affecting the face of music, compared to studio recording?

Dan: It’s a very hard question because in terms of people doing their own recording, I think there’s nothing wrong with that. I think it’s a good thing that people are embracing technology and I think they’re getting better as song writers but a lot of the time I think they’re getting lazier as players, being brutally honest with you. But I don’t think that people realise the amount of time it takes for a band to a good album and this is what you see a lot of these days and people that go into a good studio and spend a good amount of time working on a professional album. You can always tell when a band has a good album and when they’ve half arsed it. Even with bigger bands. You see a lot of bigger bands these days: "Yeah, we decided to self-produce it" and they’ve done a massive record before and funnily enough that massive record before sounds amazing and the next one sounds shite. Fucking shite. The guy who runs the studio with me, Joe, me and him literally spend the best part of the whole day, every day, working with bands and you need that other person’s input, you really do. You need someone else to tell you what’s right, what’s wrong, even like, I’m in my own band and I’m recording it, you lose sight, always. You always lose the goal, you need someone whose got that extra set of ears to tell you where you’re going wrong and where you’re going right and obviously Joe does that for us. But bands need that.

Damjan: I think that really depends on the specific band or person you’re thinking about because one of my other bands, we recorded the drums with Dan and the rest at home but we still had that input from Dan and we’ve been recording with him for years, like EPs and stuff. But I think it depends on what you want out of music and your own personal music and for some people, it’s a money issue as well. It depends what direction you wanna take it.

Nico: Alright, next questions. What would you say is the most challenging thing about being a musician?

Sarah: Most challenging thing? As long as we communicate with each other, there’s nothing that is challenging, as long as we’re honest with each other. We’re not always going to agree with one another, I’m not always going to like his riff and he’s not always gonna like my melody, we’ve just got to make sure we don’t lie to each other and that we communicate with each other and I think a lot of bands have lost that. Now, I do know that the bigger the band gets, the more politics are involved, money, managers. The bigger the bands get, the greedier people get. The more people want a cut of what you do. It’s all us that put in the fucking hard work and as long as we don’t lose sight and are all open minded. I wouldn’t say this is challenging, I’m just saying that we all have to pull our shit together and make it work.

Nico: Last couple of questions now. Where would you like to see the band in five years time?

Dan: I don’t mind where we end up, so long as it’s a natural progression. It’s like I think we have the potential to carry on for another five years but we’ll just see where it ends up really. Maybe in a bin. Hopefully next year, you’ll see a few progressions in the tours and maybe some festivals and another album as well. It should just carry on as it is.

Nico: Alright, before we finish up, do you guys have anything to say to the readers?

Dan: Thank you for your support.

Sarah: Just give us a chance, whether you’re a fan or not. Whoever’s reading, you’ve got to give new bands a chance. So, forget what you think you know. If you’re judging someone on their image, or a bit of footage on YouTube that’s been filmed on a mobile phone, make up your own mind by actually leaving your house and checking these bands out because you could be missing a real gem.

Dan: Put it this way, any band you name, be it In Flames, Soilwork, Cradle of Filth, Dimmu Borgir, they all started off playing in a pub somewhere. Go support local bands because if you want your next Metallicas and your next Iron Maidens, they’re always going to start in these small venues, so go down and support local metal.

Sarah: Yeah, you have to because all these bands started somewhere with a chance and I know that people don’t have the money and sadly you do have to pay to see a band but nothing’s free. Just because you’re payign a ticket of £6 doesn’t mean the band is getting that money and then off down to the pub later. It’s that ticket price which is helping the bands to play your local area. Without the support and open mindedness of the listener, the scene is going to die and after the conversations with certain good promoters, who are struggling, who are not going to be promoting, the good promoters leave and the little kid promoters come in thinking "Ah, I can make some money from this band" and the moment when that’s what you’ve got in every city, goodbye to the scene, I’m telling ya. We’ve dealt with that, a few kids, even on the first tour with The Dead Lay Waiting, a kid thinking "I’ll charge £9 on the door, this and that, gonna do really well", he lost shit loads of money because he got greedy and cancelled the next show, fucking over the people that were gonna go to that show. I know it costs to do these gigs but it’s not about money, if you believe in the scene, you’ve got to take chances. Don’t read rumours, make up your own mind, you know? Even album reviews, it takes a year…

Dan: He reviews albums…

Nico: Don’t worry about it.

Sarah: What I mean is that it takes us, as a band, a year to write an album, to produce it, to mix it, to master it, to sit down. It takes a reviewer less than five minutes to rip it apart. There’s good productive journalism and there’s fucking lazy journalism that goes "sounds like this band, sounds like that band". Again, there’s a large amount of journalists who want their five minutes of fame. Reviewers need to remember that they have the capability of influencing thousands of people with their opinion and it’s your opinion if you think we’re shit or not. It’s up to the listener to think "This review thinks it’s shit but you know what, I’m going to go check it out". I think we’re losing that ability to think for ourselves and allowing ourselves to be dictated by magazines and adverts.

Nico: Very true. Well, thanks for that, guys and have a great show tonight.

Cradle of Filth – Midnight in the Labyrinth

Posted in Review with tags , , , , , on 24th April 2012 by tobiasgray

Band: Cradle of Filth
Album: Midnight in the Labyrinth
Release date: April 21st 2012
Genre: Orchestral/Soundtrack
Label: Peaceville/Nuclear Blast

One of Britain’s most successful and controversial bands of the last twenty years return with their first full length album since 2010’s Darkly, Darkly, Venus Aversa.

Never a group to rest on their laurels, Cradle of Filth have meandered through various facets of metal in their long career.  From the early gothic and epic ‘black’ metal, to later thrash and conceptual themes, Cradle have never been afraid to experiment.  This time they have delivered yet another surprise with orchestral reinterpretations of tracks from their first four albums, stripped of guitars, drums, keyboards and the trademark higher register shrieks of the incomparable macabre poet – Dani Filth.

Midnight in the Labyrinth‘ is a two CD collection, with disc one containing 10 tracks, narrated by Dani (in his low, gutteral, spoken voice), and with the welcome return of Cradle of Filth operatic vocal goddess, Sarah Jezebel Deva.  Disc 2 contains the same tracks, sans vocal narration.

Cradle of Filth don’t make it easy on their fans.  Oldtimers reminisce about the earlier raw, yet highly structured works up to and including ‘Cruelty and the Beast‘.  While passionate newer followers, introduced to the band from ‘Midian‘ through to ‘Darkly, Darkly, Venus Aversa‘ maintain their major label, commercial success.  This bold release unfortunately fails in its ambitions however…

Epic orchestral scores have freedom throughout their creative process.  Themes can be introduced, teased, then unleashed as the music ebbs and flows. Harmonies and counter melodies are woven through the supporting instruments, and important moments can be ‘suspended’ to increase their dramatic impact.  It feels as though Mark Newby-Robson (Mark de Sade) has been constrained with just how much freedom he was allowed to change these classic tracks.  The structures are identical to the originals and so supporting sections, where the vocals should be the focal part, drag into repetitious themes.

The arbitrary ‘narrations’ serve to guide lost listeners as to where in the track they are up to, but drop in sporadically at random intervals.  The recording is excellent and familiar riffs played on strings is interesting to hear, but I was disappointed that more harmonies and counter melodies could not have been introduced, or the song structures edited to provide a more stimulating overall production (ie: ‘Funeral in Carpathia‘ at close to nine minutes!).

That being said, when the experiment works – it works well.  Opener  “A Gothic Romance (Red Roses for the Devil’s Whore)” has the variety to really engage the listener.  Memorable riff after riff is thrown at you and the note perfect accompaniments of Sarah Jezebel Deva raise the music to euphoric heights.  Other classics such as “Summer Dying Fast” and (album highlight), a blistering, energetic rendition of “Cruelty Brought Thee Orchids”  truly demonstrate what this genre is capable of.  The sublime vocal talents of SJD lead me to wonder how these tracks would sound with operatic lead vocals, though a Cradle of Filth album with Mr Filth is arguably not a Cradle of Filth album at all!

‘Midnight in the Labyrinth’ is an album Cradle fans, especially those already familiar with the first four albums, owe it to themselves to listen to.  A vastly different proposal, and more effective as background or ambient music than something that demands your full attention…but if that’s what you wanted – listen to ‘Dusk…And Her Embrace’ instead!

Ambient – 4/5

Metal – 2.5/5

Tobias Gray

Exclusive Two-Disc Cradle Album Available On Record Store Day

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , on 13th March 2012 by Nico Davidson

Midnight In The Labyrinth is the latest, inspired work, from the UK’s most successful extreme act, traversing an ethereal cinematic landscape of classical and symphonic darkness; a style the band has always woven seamlessly into their compositions.

Midnight in the  Labyrinth is available to coincide with Record Store Day on April 21st in participating countries, and sees a general release across other countries, as a strictly limited edition 2-disc set of delectable magic, with disc 1 containing narrated nightmares courtesy of Dani Filth, plus additional vocals from former Cradle backing vocalist Sarah Jezebel Deva, whilst disc 2 contains purely orchestral and symphonic recordings.

Taking the most requested tracks from the first four official releases, Cradle of Filth have fulfilled audience desire by creating an album based on their most popular older tracks, but one that is delivered orchestrally to create a rich, haunting sonic landscape in the vein of soundtrack composers such as Jerry Goldsmith, Danny Elfman and Hans Zimmer.

Ten songs make up this 78 minute masterwork including the addition of a thirteen minute exclusive aural séance on CD1, indulging such COF classics as Funeral In Carpathia, The Twisted Nails Of Faith and Summer Dying Fast, which has already been showcased on last year’s Evermore Darkly EP to a more than rapturous audience response.

Cradle Of Filth also return this Halloween with their new studio  album.

Moonloop Sign To Listenable

Posted in News with tags , , , , on 7th March 2012 by Nico Davidson

The ever-growing Listenable Records (home to acts such as Betraying the Martyrs, Sarah Jezebel Deva and Gorod) have announced the latest addition to their family, none than the Spaniard progressive death metal out Moonloop.

Moonloop were formed in Barcelona, roughly 11 years ago in 2001. Their sound is said to be characterised by powerful guitar riffs and atmospheric passages.  In 2011 Moonloop recorded their debut album Deeply From the Earth. After a long process, the record was mixed at The Room studios by Gorka Dresbaj and mastered at Mastering Room AB (Sweden) by Goran Finnberg. The album concept is based on Mother Earth, as well as on life experiences.

Moonloop are:

Eric Baule – vocals, guitar
Juanjo Martin – rhythm guitar, vocals
Raul Payán – drums
Vic Granell – bass

SJD UK Tour Dates Announced

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , on 2nd February 2012 by Nico Davidson

At long last, the tour dates for Sarah Jezebel Deva’s along awaited “The Corruption” UK tour have been announced. If this tour is anything like the last one [which took place in October 2011] then you’re all in for a treat.

Dates as followed:

16th Birmingham- The End
17th Manchester- Dry Bar
18th Liverpool- The Lomax
19th Leeds – The Cockpit
20th Grimsby- Yardbirds
23th Cardiff- Bogiez
24th Bristol- Tunnels
25th Andover – George
26th Brighton- Hydrant
27th London – Nambucca

SJD To Continue ANGTORIA Project

Posted in News with tags , , , , , on 25th December 2011 by Nico Davidson

On Christmas Eve, Sarah Jezebel Deva announced that she and Chris Rehn [Co-founding member & co-song writer of Angtoria] will be continuing from where Angtoria left off some five years ago. According to the update, the project will follow in the same vein as “God Has A Plan For Us All”. The full update reads as followed:

Chris Rehn & Sarah Jezebel Deva, both founding members & songwriters of the band Angtoria, will be continuing where Angtoria left off some 5 years ago. The music will continue in the same vein as “God Has A Plan For Us All”, blending the world of epic IMG_4433orchestral music with metal, HOWEVER!, we sadly have to change the name due to reasons beyond our control. Writing for the new album will start in January and of course, we will update you with the new name & our progress.

In other SJD related news, Sarah also announced that she will be working with her former band, Cradle of Filth, on the orchestral album “Midnight In The Labyrinth”. Sarah stated the following in her the update on her official Facebook:

In 2008, I parted ways with COF, to pursue a life in Australia, bum some Kangaroos & to go it alone as a solo musician. I know a lot of fans were disappointed with the departure & until now, when ever a fan asks “Will you ever work with COF again”?, the answer has been NO!! Well, last week, Mr Filth sent me an email & after many chats, I have decided to take him up on his offer to participate on the new Orchestral album “Midnight In The Labyrinth”

For more updates and news about Sarah Jezebel Deva, head on over to her official Facebook page. Don’t forget that SJD will be touring the UK again in May. Dates will be announced in January. SJD’s latest album “The Corruption Of Mercy” is also available through Listenable Records.

Don’t forget to read our interview with SJD’s bassist, Ablaz, by clicking here.

Photo by David Taylor.

The Welly Warmer @ The Ringside [Live Review]

Posted in Gig, Live with tags , , , , , , , , on 4th November 2011 by conorclaustrophobia

Bands: ReVerbed, Heartless Angels, Frisky Biscuit, Blue Eyes Don’t Lie
Location: The Ringside, Hull
Date: 3rd November 2011

The Welly Warmer has been a part of the local music scene in Hull for a long time now, with Music HQ and Arcade Promotions each taking it in turns to put it on every Thursday night at the Ringside. Due to some bands dropping out last minute, Frisky Biscuit and Heartless Angels stepped in as the replacement acts for the night.

The first act to play were the acoustic quartet Frisky Biscuit. To say that I’ve never been interested in acoustic music, this quartet really did impress me. Their set started with two covers before they performed their new original song called “Breathe In” which was a masterpiece of a song. Frisky Biscuit’s members also displayed a very diverse vocal range. They’re certainly a band I would like to see play again at the Welly Warmer.

Heartless Angels brought a pop punk influenced set to the Welly Warmer with them. Their set was a mixture of mediocre songs and some truly great ones. They sounded to have improved since they shared the stage with former Cradle of Filth vocalist Sarah Jezebel Deva, as they were more active on the stage. The frontwoman reminded me a bit of Hayley Williams from Paramore – Both vocally and visually. The main support of the night were Blue Eyes Don’t Lie. To say they’re a pop rock band, they sounded more like a hard rock outfit. Though the crowd seemed to enjoy them, I found to be not as entertaining as the first two bands.

Doncaster-based ReVerbed were the headlining act and no wonder – They put on a truly tremendous show. In all honestly, they were the best band of the night. They had a great sound and kept what was left of the crowd entertained. Their alt-rock sound really did blow the minds of the crowd, especially songs like “Obsession”, “Beautiful Lie” and “Burn”. The combination of male and female vocals worked well and did the music a lot of justice. Hopefully, we’ll be seeing more of ReVerbed in Hull and other parts of the UK as well.

Conor Taylor