Archive for Moscow

Belphegor premier new video for In Blood – Devour This Sanctity on YouTube

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , , on 1st November 2013 by Nico Davidson

In time for the age-long celebration of All Hallow’s Eve, European black and death metal royalty premiered the video for their new single In Blood – Devour This Sanctity last night on YouTube.com. The clip was filmed at Moskva Hall in Moscow and was recorded and edited by Andrey Kovalev. The song itself is taken from Belphegor‘s latest offering of black and death laced metal Blood Magick Necromance, which was released in January 2011. Commenting on the video, vocalist and guitarist Helmuth said:

What a brutal concert; extreme, obscene and memorable. For the new video I decided to take In Blood – Devour This Sanctity with visual live sequences from the Moscow ritual. Authentic and insane. One of my fave tracks in a live situation. Musick wise inspired by The Hungarian Dances by the classical composer Johannes Brahms ( 1833-1897 ). You also find there all the Belphegor trademarks. Shredding guitars, fast drums and heretical grunts. Enjoy!

The band’s highly anticipated 10th studio album was recorded and mixed at Mana Studios with producer Erik Rutan (Cannibal CorpseGoatwhore, Hate Eternal). The as-of-yet-untitled record is tentatively scheduled for a May 2014 via Nuclear Blast Records. This will be band’s first album since Helmuth’s near death experience, which caused the band to cancel several tours in 2011/2012.

Belphergor online:

http://www.facebook.com/belphegor

Crimson Blue – Innocence

Posted in Review with tags , , , , , on 25th July 2013 by Pieni

Crimson Blue
“Innocence”
Experimental Nu Metal
Self-released on 8th December 2011

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“Experimental Nu Metal” was the closest to a conventional genre that I’ve come up with. Using the band’s own words, they play “Nu Art Metal” and that basically means that they pick the nu metal basis and entwine it with progressive lines, resulting in odd experiences – hence my choice of calling it “experimental”.

The first track, “Iceland”, is a bit deceiving regarding the energy that’s about to come throughout the rest of the album. Despite being a good song, each instrument leaving its mark, the rhythm is quite melancholic, a ballad of sorts. And so, at the same time, it shows you how out of the ordinary these Russians are – how often does a metal album start with a ballad? Starts and ends, as the final title-track also unfolds at a soft melodic pace.

“L.M.A.”, which stands for “losing my angel”, gives you a clearer picture of what Crimson Blue are about, with a sharp dissonance toning up those modern riffs. Singer Dani Hellstrom’s voice goes a little higher, but fortunately doesn’t reach the soprano peak that puts her in that category. In fact, she only brushes the border of that tone for brief seconds, during the title-track. But given the strength and steadiness of her trained voice, you cannot doubt that she is in the soprano rank. And those keys you listen to are also in her charge, through the means of a keytar.

“Clouds” is quite an indie tune, while “Flax” and “H.U. Lab Experiment I – The 6th Sense” get my vote for best prog tracks in this album. And “Haesitaio” deserves kudos for its fierceness.

“Innocence” is probably a little too avant-garde for the majority of the listeners, but it’s definitely a treat to those who appreciate this kind of musical journeys.

4,5 / 5

by Renata “Pieni” Lino