Archive for Lee Rule

Obsolete Tomorrow – The Burden Of Forever

Posted in CD, Metal with tags , , , , , on 24th February 2012 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Band: Obsolete Tomorrow
Album: The Burden Of Forever
Genre: True Yorkshire Death Metal
Release Date: N/A
Label: eMortal Records

Obsolete Tomorrow is the solo project of Driffield-based metal overlord Lee Rule [Ravenage, Windrider, ex-Divine Sinn]. Now, I’ll be honest, the debut release from Obsolete Tomorrow, that was released back in 2010, literally made me wet myself with excitement like a pre-pubescent teenager. The second I found the newest release, The Burden of Forever, I wet myself again in excitement. Unfortunately, I have no clean underwear now… Not that your innocent minds needed to know that, eh? I think I’ve prattled on enough about my lack of bladder control, so how about some prattling about The Burden of Forever?

The raw guitars and vocals that introduce the title track, The Burden of Forever, take the listener surprise and launch them into a passage of grand and majestic sounding guitar work which progresses into a savage and terrifying onslaught of demonic vocals and barbaric guitars which scream through the speakers like a metallic choir of hard rocking angels. The drums act like a palpitating heartbeat, transitioning perfectly with each change of the track, adding that extra crunch with the bass. The keyboards are quite dramatic and sinister sounding, almost like something you’d hear in a horror flick though they bring a solemn sound toward the end of the track.

Resurrected sounds to be the love child of the thrash and death metal genres, without the nasty parts of either. The choir voices give the song an almost God of War-like epic feel. The vocals are much like the raging snarls of a beast unleashing its fury upon the unsuspecting listener. The breakdown just feels perfect with the choir voices injecting the eerie sound of grandeur. And the grand finale of the EP is none other than The Art of Catharsis. The slow intro acts as a powerful crescendo that leads into monstrous train wreck of brutality unimaginable to the average metal fan. Everything seems to fit together like a thousand piece jigsaw. The clean vocals are a shock but a good one. The keyboards seem to add a certain Epica or MaYaN sound, as does the radio voiceover. The guitars are the most impressive part of the track as they seem to change like the waves of the ocean while unrelenting in their impact on the ears. The super heavy part of the song is definitely the biggest highlight of the EP as well.

The Burden of Forever takes the brutality of Beauty Through Chaos and multiplies it ten times over while taking the musicianship to a whole new level. Obsolete Tomorrow is just what the doctor ordered for the dying metal scene that’s being replaced with bands more concerned about their hair than the music and The Burden of Forever is one hell of a heavy side effect of this mighty prescription. And on that note, all I have to say is: Use caution, one does not simply listen to this without earplugs… Unless you really want to hear the full extent of it!

5/5

Nico Davidson

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Band Of The Month [December, 2011]: Collisions

Posted in Band Of The Month with tags , , , on 2nd December 2011 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Breaking tradition of a metal band being the Band of the Month, upcoming Hull-based post-hardcore quintet Collisions smashed the other bands in the voting last week and no wonder why. Powerful guitar sections, strong vocals and sick drums mixed in with an EP produced by Lee Rule makes for a damn good band.

Unfortunately, we couldn’t find a picture of the band to go along with this article. So, here’s a pretty video instead! Well, we say video…

Sea Of Giants – To The Deepest Depths [2011]

Posted in 'Core with tags , , , , , , , on 31st October 2011 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Band: Sea Of Giants
Album: To The Deepest Depths EP
Release year: 2011
Genre: Metalcore/Deathcore

Sea Of Giants are fairly new to the British metalcore scene but have already proven their worth by supporting Shadows Chasing Ghosts at Home From Home Fest back in August as well as playing a number of other gig as well. “To The Deepest Depths” is their first release which was recorded and produced by Lee Rule [Windrider, Ravenage, Obsolete Tomorrow] who also produced the recent release by Collisions.

”See You In Court” starts off with a surprisingly catchy and melodic riff. The track progresses into a more in-your-face brutal styled piece. The vocals show quite the range, going from death metal grunts to hardcore screams and everything in between. The drums fit their part pretty well, adding to the energy of the music. “This Is To Death” takes no prisoners as it ravages its way on next like a bull that’s just seen red. The vocals are on top form though its the guitars that are the most entertaining aspect of the song.

Coming into the second half of the EP is “Filthy Animal”. The intro is a sound sample which sounds to be taken from a movie. The section that follows after feels weak in comparison to the previous two songs though the vocals keep the track going enough to keep the attention of the listener. The break down is an interesting part of the song as well as it leads into a more powerful part. The one thing that is truly a shock is the melodic guitar section about half way through which probably would sound more solid with a second guitar. Fortunately the drums and vocals save it.

The EP finishes with “Bloodshot Eyes” – Otherwise known as the most violent and aggressive part of the EP. The vocals literally border on the line of being black metal styled screams and the guitars are like the bloodthirsty howls of the damned. The drums are barbaric and savage but intelligently played at the same time. The section towards the end that features no guitars, leaving only the drums, vocals and bass is definitely one of the highlights of the EP.

For a debut release, “To The Deepest Depths” is good. There’s clear signs of hardcore, metalcore and deathcore influences in the music but the band keep their own sound. The EP has a strong start and a strong finish. The sound is clean and polished without ruining the raw aggression of the music or the vocals. The only negative thing about the EP is the third track which is mediocre at best.

4/5

Nico Davidson

Collisions – Heavy Echo [2011]

Posted in 'Core with tags , , , , , on 3rd October 2011 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Band: Collisions
Album: Heavy Echo EP
Release year: 2011
Genre: Metalcore

Collisions are a metalcore band from Hull, East Yorkshire who started playing shows in February 2011. They their EP “Heavy Echo” was produced by Lee Rule [Obsolete Tomorrow, Ravenage, Windrider, e-Divine Sinn].

”XII” is the first track of the EP, only being a breakdown-styled instrumental lasting for half a minute. “Seige” continues on where “XII” ended. The vocals seem weak and strained and the excessive use of drums doesn’t seem to blend well with the guitars in some parts – Truly disappointing as the drums are beasty. The guitars are powerful and on the verge of being real face melters in certain sections.

“Old Wounds” starts with a very drum dominated sound combined with raw vocals and some guitar riffs. The use of melodic riffs inserts an interesting sound to the track, mush more enjoyable than the overuse of drums. Energy quite literally bursts from this song, this could definitely be a mosh pit anthem at a live show – Let’s hope so. The vocals definitely give the song a brutalising edge. The halfway point of the EP comes in the form of “Don’t Pity Me”, beginning with a loud, aggressive vocal section followed by angsty guitars and drums. The big issue with this song is its length – It’s too short!

”Empty Threats” follows after, starting with an intro that has less emphasis on the drum work, which is fortunate for those who aren’t keen on drum overuse. The guitars have subtle hints of melodic stylings in their composition whilst the vocals and drums bring the powerful, destructive sound. The riffs do progress into something more openly melodic yet keeping true to a heavy touch for the song as well. “The Vigil” is a very calm instrumental for the most part, being somewhat similar to a natural high feeling in its atmosphere. There is a heavy section towards the end but nothing to heavy, keeping the mellow sound there. “IWIHMH” is the final part of the EP, sending the EP out with a loud and face breaking roar of guitars and drums, similar to the way “XII” began the EP.

Though having a somewhat distasteful start, the EP is definitely a treat for fans of metalcore and might even wow some non-metalcore fans as well. The production values are simply amazing as well, giving “Heavy Echo” that crisp, clean sound without betraying the style of the band.

4/5

Nico Davidson

Lee Rule – Alive EP [2011]

Posted in Instrumental with tags , , , , , on 30th August 2011 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Band: Lee Rule
Album: Alive EP
Release year: 2011
Genre: Instrumental/Chill Out

”Alive” is the newest release by Driffield-based musician Lee Rule. Lee has described it to be more chilled out compared to the stuff he’s written for Obsolete Tomorrow.

The EP begins with the soothing introduction of “Namaste” which eases the listener into a state of calmness with the beautiful flute medley at the beginning. As the track progresses, the use of other sounds and instruments come into play, keeping it calm yet upbeat at the same time. The song just oozes with emotion. “To Dream” starts with a more solemn introduction, the kind that brings a tear to the eyes of the listener. The piano sections are well composed and very touching on both an emotional and spiritual level, stirring something within the soul.

”To Believe” carries on from where “To Dream” finishes, with a slightly faster tempo it seems. The flute section keeps the song very chilled and soulful. The EP finishes with “L.I.V.E”, which begins with the sound of birds singing and a type of chime or bell being played. The flute medley that follows after is amazing. The drums blend, oddly, well with the flute sections. Towards its end the song does turn heavy – Not brutalising heavy but more of a rock-styled heavy that keeps the atmosphere created by the EP.

It’s a shock to hear Lee Rule compose and play something that isn’t metal yet at the same time it’s a welcome. Alive is a well composed and produced EP and a brilliant record to chill out to on those lazy days. Perhaps Lee might release more records like this. All we can do is hope that he does.

5/5

Nico Davidson

Obsolete Tomorrow – Beauty Through Chaos [2010]

Posted in CD, Metal with tags , , , , , , , on 31st July 2011 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Band: Obsolete Tomorrow
Album: Beauty Through Chaos
Release year: 2010
Genre: Progressive Death Metal/Yorkshire Metal

Obsolete Tomorrow is the solo project of Driffield based guitarist and producer Lee Rule [Ravenage, Windrider, ex-Divine Sinn]. The debut EP “Beauty Through Chaos” [A concept EP revolving around Rule’s life] was released through Rule’s label Xeroxed Records.

The generically named “Prelude” is the first track of the album. Even on a low volume the sheer aggression of the guitars and drums bursts through the speakers. “Battle Ready” comes shredding its way next with a violent combination of raw growls, guitars and drums. The guitars are acute in their composition and playing whilst the drums are masterfully played. The vocals are extremely impressive, almost demonic – Even the whispered growls are a great addition to the track and the EP. The guitar solo is brilliant, very melodic – Mixing well with the aggressive rhythm. Two songs in and the EP is already at a savagely awesome beginning.

The hard-bitten intro of “The Eternal Nightmare” blasts its way next with a ruthless combo of guitars and drums. The synths are a great part of the track, adding a calmness to the hurricane-like force of pure brutality. The drum work is precise but savagely brutal and the vocals are feral and beasty. The double bass pedal barrages are an ingenious addition to the track as well. “Let Chaos Rise” starts with a less rage-fuelled riff, being more akin to progressive metal than death metal, as can be heard in other sections of the track. The guitars and drums certainly show a progressive influence though the vocals keep the angst and aggression. The synths are amazing. There are some death metal elements in the guitars and drums – Good news for those whom aren’t a fan of progressive metal. The highlight of the song would definitely have to be the guitar solo.

”My Asylum” is one of the more lighter songs on the EP, featuring a masterful use of melodic guitar riffs. The track could be easily described as the calm before the storm, which is most true considering the bloodthirsty assault of metal that follows in the form of “The New Beginning” which mixes the aggression and heaviness of death metal with the interesting influences of progressive metal. The drum work is entertaining in its style and playing, blending well with the guitars and vocals. The vocals certainly add the brutal element to the song. The different tempos throughout the track add a new dynamic to the entire EP as well as the track.

”The Rise Of Beauty” is another softer song on the EP, being akin to a mixture of progressive and melodic metal. Surprisingly, there’s a use of female vocals that create the good ol’ “beauty and the beast” effect with the harsh growls. The riffs are very melodic and heavy in some sections. The choir voices from the synths add a very mystical and epic atmosphere to the track. The rough, aggression guitar work contrasts well with the soft, melodic riffs and the female vocals are just enchanting. The EP finishes with “The War Is Over”, another soft, progressive styled track that is the perfect end to a brilliant EP.

Both composition-wise and production-wise, Beauty Through Chaos is a masterpiece. If you didn’t know it was the debut release of Obsolete Tomorrow, you’d most certainly think it was a later release in Obsolete Tomorrow’s discography. Progressive death metal has never been so brilliantly composed! It’s probably the best release in the British metal scene.

5/5

Nico Davidson

Interview: Lee Rule [2011]

Posted in Interview with tags , , , , , on 5th July 2011 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

We sit down and speak with the “Lord of Brutality” Lee Rule about his up and coming “release “Alive” and other projects.

Nico: Hello. Thanks for taking the time to chat with us today.

Lee: It’s fine, man. Anytime, anytime. It’s all good.

N: It was recently announced that you’re bringing out a new release “Alive” under your name rather than the Obsolete Tomorrow name. Is there any reason for this?

L: I was thinking at first of having it under the Obsolete moniker but I think it would be best on a different name because I think that Obsolete Tomorrow should be kept quite heavy. I think if I had brought out a softer album under that name it would have, maybe, confused a lot of people and might have put a lot of people of the next album which is out soon. So yeah, I decided it would be best under a separate name just to keep the two genres separate. That’s the main reason for it anyway.

N: Is there any lyrical concept behind “Alive” or is it like each track has a different concept [both lyrically and musically]?

L: There’s actually not a lot of lyrics at all on the album to be fair. It’s more of an instrumental album. I think there’s maybe one song that has some lyrics but there’s not really a great deal, to be quite honest with ya. The album is just very chilled, atmospheric sort of album. It’s not heavy or anything. It’s quite progressive and I’m experimenting quite a lot more with different instrumentation as well. So it’s not based all around one instrument. There’s a lot of orchestration and a lot of drums and percussion and not really a great deal of electronic instruments. There’s quite a lot of flutes as well which is quite weird for me.

N: [laughter] Nothing wrong with the flutes. What would you say was the main inspiration for this new release [Alive] then?

L: I’ve always been interested in writing something a bit more relaxed but I could never really get into that frame of mind until last week when I was in America. I was sat in the airport and I was quite surprisingly calm during that situation which was quite strange. Just seeing loads of people rushing around, stressing over which flight they’re trying to get. It was just weird to see, there was me just on my own, chilled out and everyone else is going mental. Then I thought, well people need to chill out a bit, so maybe I should write some chilled out music to try help them chill.

N: Has this been a different sort of experience for you compared to what you previously did with the “Beauty Through Chaos” album for Obsolete Tomorrow?

L: Yeah, it’s been a completely different experience really. Obsolete Tomorrow [Beauty Through Chaos], I wrote that very quickly. I’m surprised at how fast I wrote, it was a quite fast paced writing style – I probably wrote a song once a day kind of thing and got it finished within maybe a month. This one is a much more relaxed approach. The song structures aren’t very consistent. It’s very progressive, there’s not really an intro, verse, chorus, it’s more like one big instrumental along with different sections of stuff. Like I was saying, there’s a lot of atmospherics on it and once I get that down as a bass line, it chills me out as well ‘cause I can sit back and experience that as I’m writing the next part like a flute bit or something.

N: You have another album in the works, a more Zombie Metal orientated album based on the concept of a zombie apocalypse. Is there any reason for this? And will it be like a musical?

L: I wouldn’t say it’s a musical at all, it’s more like a film without the picture really. Just a big epic soundtrack to it – Every other song is like a skit with the voice actors doing their part. After that sort of scene or skit, there’ll be a song that will cover that skit. It’s just so over the top, it’s unreal. In the skits, we got stuff like chainsaws going off and people going crazy.

N: Sounds like it’s going to be a very interesting album.

L: I hope it will be.

N: You’re working on a lot of different albums [such as The Burden of Forever and Theatre Of The Damned] and you recently helped to produce the recent EP from Driffield based band The Dials and you’re a university student as well and you run your own record label [Xeroxed Records]. Where do you find the time to actually be able to do all this?

L: I had to quit my job to be able to manage this year’s scale of things I’m trying to do. As cliché as it sounds, I have my hands in a lot of pies at the moment. I’m pretty much covering every genre of music possible and every sort of aspect of the business. I work quite weirdly, I can’t just work on one project at a time. I’ve got to do something else as well just to keep myself sane. I think that’s the reason why I started writing “Alive” as I was doing that zombie thing. It’s more chilled out while the zombie one is very complicated, there’s a lot of stuff going on in it, so I just needed something to sit back and relax on. It p*sses of my neighbours and my mum ‘cause I’m just constantly in my studio making noise. [Laughter]. But I’m sure after the next few months, when the next few albums [Alive and Theatre Of The Damned] are finished, I’ll keep it down a bit and just chill.

N: With your future albums, be them under the Obsolete moniker or your own name, do you have any plans to tour in support of them or just have a release show?

L: I’d love to, I really would. I think my only problem with that is jut being able to be a decent frontman – Obviously it’s my voice on the album but doing it live is a completely different thing. I’ve never really been a frontman in a band since I was about 13. I’m sure if we got enough practise in we could do it – I’ve got a band together for the Obsolete Tomorrow album [Beauty Through Chaos]. It’s some friends but we’ve never practised anything yet but it’s there just in case we do need to tour or something but yeah, I’d love to it. As of yet there’s no real plans. There might be a surprise show in October but I’ll have to see how that works out. Everything is just studio based at the moment but I think once I’ve got more songs under my belt, I could put on quite a long show. I don’t think I’d go on a full tour though, maybe a few shows first and then just build it up there.

N: That sounds like quite a sound plan. For the Obsolete Tomorrow album [Beauty Through Chaos], you’ve stated before that it’s based on a rough part in your life. Would you say that writing the album changed you emotionally? Or spiritually even?

L: Definitely! I think if I was younger, having been through that situation and not being able to write or record music, I would have taken away the anger another way like going on a massive binge with my mates. But writing the album made me understand that there are better ways of using that energy, rather than wasting it, just make it into something positive. It was quite a weird sort of experience, writing the album ‘cause it was emotionally draining because I had to go through all those situations over and over again in my head to try and capture the emotion I was going through which was quite draining but I think it came off alright. I hope anyway. After I finished it, I felt nothing but pure happiness.

N: You’re quite involved with the local music scene, are there any bands that you’ recommend to our readers? Be they metal rock, electronica, are there any musicians that you’d suggest they’d keep their eye out for?

L: Absolutely! In Hull, especially, there’s a lot of bands like Pastel Jack, Infernal Creation, stuff like that. Obviously there’s the two bands I’m working with, Windrider and Ravenage. I think Hull has got a lot of talent right now, it’s quite promising to see. In Driffield, there’s a few bands but they all kinda stick with one genre of music. I don’t know if they’re afraid to do their own thing but I think they need to branch out a bit more. There’s one band that’s really good called “Parkmoor”. They’re like a hard rock band.

N: Sounds good, sounds good. That’s all really. Thanks again for taking the time to speak to with us today, Lee And good luck with your future albums.

L: Anytime, man, anytime. Take care.