Archive for Johnny Cash

Behemoth’s Nergal launches dark folk side-project Me And That Man

Posted in Folk, Misc., News, Studio Report with tags , , , , , , , on 20th January 2017 by izaforestspirit

The Behemoth frontman Nergal has recently formed a new side-project with rock musician John Porter. The project is called Me And That Man and it is completely different from Nergal’s main band.

There are no metal elements, instead Me And That Man is more akin to the works of Johnny Cash and Nick Cave. Dark folk is the best description that I can think of.

The duo are currently working on their debut album ‘Songs of Love and Death’, which is scheduled to hit the shops on 24th March 2017 via Cooking Vinyl.

In the meantime you can check out their first video here:

For more information about the project visit:

https://www.facebook.com/meandthatman/?fref=ts

http://www.meandthatman.com/

Interview: Liv Kristine

Posted in Interview with tags , , , , , , on 10th September 2012 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Liv Kristine is one of the most prominent songwriters and performing artists in both the Norwegian music scene, as well as the international music scene. Beginning her musical career with Theatre of Tragedy, where she pioneered the use of beauty and beast vocals, Liv soon moved onto bigger things when she formed Leaves’ Eyes with the five musicians from Atrocity, including her husband Alexander Krull. Aside from her work with Leaves’ Eyes, Liv is well known for her solo project, with her fourth solo album being released today. Luckily, Nico was able to have a chat with Liv regarding her solo career, her inspirations, influences and the progress of her musical career.

Nico: Do you feel that your new album; Libertine; differs from your previous releases?

Liv: Dues ex Machina was very atmospheric, reminding you a bit about Irish Enya, a real pop-album. Enter My Religion was more guitar-based and earthly with many interesting exotic folk influences. Skintight had some influence from Johnny Cash, which sometimes gives the listeners a warm and here-and-now camp-fire feeling experience. Libertine is a back-to-the-roots album, containing the most emotional ballads I’ve ever composed for a solo album, it even has a dark but sweet feeling to it, through both the piano, the dark bass lines and guitars. I see every album becoming more and more individual. Talking about genre, I would say all of my albums are somehow indie, pop, rock or metal.

N: Regarding the lyrics on the new release, are there are any stories behind the lyrics?

L: Libertine is full of wonderful moments that remind you of being in love, with someone, freedom, a scent, chocolate, or with life itself. As you might have guessed, I am myself a collector of those special moments in life when you feel love and happiness. This is what I want to give my listeners through my art. Skintight was very much connected to my childhood, therefore it was dedicated to the children of this world. However Libertine, as mentioned above, shares moments from my whole life so far, not only my childhood. Most songs are actually related to my life being a young woman, a mother, wife and lover of my husband. Libertine is dedicated to my sweet, wonderful younger sister, Carmen.

N: You’ve done a lot of vocal work in different bands and on different releases, which one would you say was the most enjoyable for you to partake in?

L: Except from my own bands, Leaves’ Eyes and Liv Kristine, it was the guestvocal appearances for Atrocity [Work 80] and Cradle of Filth [Nymphetamine]. Atrocity went straight into the charts, and the Cradle-duet was even nominated for the US Grammy. Motörhead won the Grammy… They deserved it, but I’m hoping for a second chance some day.

N: What song do you feel defines your career as a vocalist?

L: Silence, i.e. one of the tracks on Libertine. Just how much I love music and composing, I love the silence of nature even more. I grew up by the sea in complete peace and calamity. I need it, silence, to gain new inspiration, come up with interesting ideas, and, most of all, to recover.

N: When it comes to writing, where do you draw your inspiration from?

L: From my inner self, especially from my past experiences or, as already mentioned before, those special, little moments in live which you will remember for a lifetime.

N: You’ve been an active musician on the metal for almost 20 years now, do you feel that the scene has changed over the years? If so, how?

L: Generally, it’s funny considering the fact that back in in the mid nineties there were no such huge casting shows on TV. When we formed Theatre of Tragedy back then, we recorded a demo tape of four tracks, the whole thing lasting one day by the price of $50. Within the same month we had three offers for a record deal from different record labels. All we had to do was to choose. Remember we were a gothic doom metal band from a small place far out in Norway. That’s a dream coming true so quickly that some of the band’s original members left before the first album production. Too much excitement and pressure all of a sudden. Can you believe that? Signing a record deal, being a metal band is so much more complicated, expensive and difficult today, outstanding artists, headbangers or not, attend casting shows to get “somewhere”; to get a reaction from “someone”. Theatre of Tragedy just had this great “beauty [angelic voice] and the beast [growls]” idea, before anyone else, and we were awarded for it. No casting shows or music business machinery behind it, just a superb idea.

N: Given the years you’ve spent as a vocalist, do you feel as if there’s more you can learn about yourself? Or do you feel that you’ve learnt everything there is to learn about yourself?

L: I am learning all the time! Standing still, stagnation, is too me the worst thing that could happen being an artist. Libertine is a huge step forward for me in my career. I only follow my musical instinct and heart. I believe I was born with a creative heart and mind and I do need to develop, to spread my wings within music and art generally, which also means to be involved with different musical styles. There are no limits for me except for my own “stomach feeling”, that is that inner voice that helps me make my decisions and find my own ways. My wide experience has made me become the artist I am, and I feel completely free to spread my wings. Thanks to my friends and fans supporting me throughout all these years, and having faith in my natural-given talent. Some day, I will take my first singing lesson.

N: Do any of your personal beliefs or philosophies influence your writing?

L: Only one: do what you feel is the right thing to do, follow your musical instinct, and heart. But listen to advice, if it comes from a well-meaning, open-minded person.

N: A large portion of our readers are musicians and are in bands, from your own experience, do you have any advice you’d like to share with them?

L: Choose band mates who have both their legs safely situated on the ground. Theatre of Tragedy went down the drains because certain band members couldn’t handle the great and sudden success of the band. All of a sudden it was all about “being important” and NOT becoming a better-trained and intelligent artist, moreover, keeping loyalty and friendship safe within the band.

N: How did your journey into the world of music begin?

L: I started to sing even before I could walk or talk, however, I never had any musical education, and I never studied music – I studied linguistics, German, English and historic languages. It was my inner voice that told me that singing is a part of me, it just comes from the heart. Actually, when I was little, I thought that every human being could sing! Well, I guess I’m lucky, having a kind of perfect hearing. Coming to influences, I grew up with Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Edvard Grieg and Tschaikowsky, and female singers like Enya, Madonna, Kate Bush, Abba, Tori Amos and Monserrat Caballe. From the very beginning, I’ve followed my musical instinct: I wanted to combine a romantic, female, angelic voice with powerful, impressive music. Then suddenly, when I was 18 years old, I found myself in the middle of writing music history with Theatre of Tragedy.

N: Before we finish up, is there any you’d like to say to the readers?

L: I thank you for being there for me all these years, with Theatre of Tragedy, Leaves’ Eyes and my solo work. I hope you enjoy Libertine as much as I did composing and recording it. I can’t wait to play it live for you!

Don’t forget that Liv Kristine will be doing signing sessions for her new album Libertine on tour with Leaves’ Eyes this month and expect another interview from Liv as we’ll be interviewing her in Manchester on Friday.