Archive for Down To A Deathmatch

Continents w/Support – Bridlington, UK

Posted in Gig, Live with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on 20th November 2013 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Continents, Aveira Skies, Sea Of Giants and more
Shades Nightclub, Bridlington
16th November 2013

Down To A Deathmatch - Photo by Nico Davidson

Following their UK tour earlier this year, Welsh hardcore titans Continents hit the road once again this month to tour in support in their new album Idle Hands. The UK tour took to them to the sunny seaside resort town of Bridlington. Opening up the show were Hull band Down To A Deathmatch. Bringing about a sharp, fierce guitar assault accompanied by an overwhelming use of screams and thundering bass and drums which led to a devastating attack on the eardrums. Proving to be active on-stage (and in the case of the vocalist, off-stage as well), DTAD performed a truly exciting set that combined a heavy use of lights and a blistering mixture of hardcore and metal elements.

[4/5]

An Act Of treason - Photo by Nico DavidsonUp next were Hull post-hardcore monsters An Act Of Treason. Their set featured an interesting use of clean vocals and screams, as well as a few bland riffs here and there but these were pushed out of the way by the heavier, more violent riffs which led to some intense pitting from the crowd. Unfortunately there were some technical issues throughout the band’s set but this didn’t stop them from unleashing proverbial hell with their anxiety-provoking drums and volcanic guitar passages. The light accompanied An Act Of Treason with pure precision (though this was the last time the lights came into play throughout the whole show) as they ploughed rather viciously throughout their set.

[3.5/5]

Sea Of Giants - Photo by Nico Davidson

Local deathcore boys Sea Of Giants were the next band to pave a path of destruction and broken bodies at the show. While they started sounding on the weak side, they soon gained the strength needed to deliver a punch to the face with a wall of sound made up from the hellish vocals, gritty bass and snarling guitar passages as well as the crushing use of percussion. The whole set, despite one or two technical issues, sounded like a bus colliding head-on with a train at high speed.

[3.5/5]

 

Aveira Skies - Photo by Nico DavidsonThe main support came in the form of Aveira Skies, who were the touring support for Continents. While they’re talented musicians and were active on stage, their set proved to be uninteresting, making use of uninspiring riffs and mediocre vocals. The music itself sounded like one long song split into several parts, becoming repetitive and inane. Aveira Skies do have the talent and potential but it felt like the songs they wrote were intended to play it safe, so to speak.

[2/5]

And finally, the main event of the night made their way on stage: Welsh hardcore titans Continents. From beginning to end, they unsheathed brutal riffs sharper than valyrian steel and a use of manic and crazed screams. Proving to be as active as the other bands on the bill, Continents really did unleash hell. The use of bass and drums were particularly catalysmic, laying the groundwork for the titanic amount of guitar segments and baneful vocals. Continents certainly represented the Welsh scene with venomous effect and if you’ve not seen them yet, you better prepare yourself for a rollercoaster ride of a show when you do.

[5/5]

Continents - Photo by Nico Davidson

Nico Davidson

Advertisements

Continents w/Support – Hull, UK

Posted in Gig, Live with tags , , , , , , , , on 18th April 2013 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Contients, When We Were Wolves, Beneath The Darkness, Sea of Giants, Down To A Deathmatch
The Ringside, Hull
12th April 2013

South Wales hardcore quintet Continents haven’t played at Hull’s Ringside since November 27th of last year but when they did they left a huge impact with their performance and this gig had a lot of expectation to live up to. A last minute show, due only to another promoter pulling out, there was a genuine concern that the turn out would be poor despite the rather impressive line up. However by the time the first band was on, a fair amount of people were throwing fists in the small room above the Ringside pub.

Describing themselves as “Hull’s Thug-Core Crew” Down To A Deathmatch have built themselves a reputation as an aggressive and no-nonsense live band with few delusions when it comes to such mundane things as solos. With relentless passion these five young men throw themselves onto the stage and have a knack of provoking the crowd into response. This was certainly true of tonight as pits were consistent and vocalist Chris Marshall’s call for a wall of death was greeted with enthusiasm. With little hooks in their songs worth mentioning for example  lead guitarist Michael Hill’s inclusion of a portion of the “Super Mario” theme music as a trigger to begin a pit and his shouting of rhythm guitarist “Luke Blackburn’s a virgin” have their merits to put a smile onto my face after an already solid and enjoyable performance from the band. An excellent choice for an opening band. [4/5]

Bridlington’s Sea of Giants have spent their time perfecting a blend of hardcore and deathcore and didn’t disappoint with a solid performance musically. Having established themselves as a popular band down the road from their home there was an appreciative crowd viewing them and though the reaction wasn’t frenetic in the way of movement there were few people who didn’t enjoy their performance. A consistent but slightly uninspiring second act but this didn’t set any tone for the rest of the night as a whole. [3/5]

Hull’s four piece post hardcore outfit Beneath The Darkness had recent line-up changes and have since remained true to the same set list with new original songs being added delivered fully in screams by their new acquisition Miles Barber. With his highs and lows sounding reminiscent of Suicide Silence and Whitechapel, he fronted the youngest band on this bill with infectious fervour. Clearly there were fans of the band in the audience as during their most well known song Manic,  the audience sang back with glee.  An excellent performance from an ever-evolving young band with guitarist Kieran Reilly and bassist Mike Baker enjoying use of their wireless kits and running throughout the audience to good natured laughter. [4/5]

South Wales post hardcore quintet and main support for this gig, When We Were Wolves delivered a performance that rarely comes around on the live circuit and is comparable to no one else on this bill (Excellent as this gig was) which was filled to saturation point with passion, aggression and fire. Vocalist Mitch Bock is a front man that has only three peers in all the local performances I have seen and they would be Sam Rudderforth (The Colour Line), Ash Gollings (Black Dogs) and Phil Cross (Continents) and he was treated with love according to this fact. With out of control pits and head-banging galore their set was musically extremely tight and advanced despite their only playing since July 2011 and an excellent mix of clean vocals and screams gave this band a stand out among all others on the bill, but ever humble they pulled up most of the audience onto the stage and embraced them, truly a moment and a ban to remember for the future. [5/5]

Following an excellent array of support acts that had a diversity of genres, Continents took to the stage and showed just why they were described by Kerrang as “Energy-fuelled epic-core with lots of aggression, a healthy blend of raw shouts and low end growls and foot stomping hooks.” And also justifying how they managed to pull in a 50+ audience with only a week of promotion. An intense stage presence that was captivating, the lads from South Wales set about tearing Hull apart with vocalist Phil Cross looking reminiscent of a serial killer at some points with the stony glares the crowd was receiving, surely this is a band that delivers a unique kind of aggression, definitely something more cold and calculating, but the music followed the vein of some of the best hardcore I’ve heard in a long time, with individuality and passion, this music encouraged two-stepping and pits and the crowd delivered with gleeful enthusiasm. Phil Cross’s determination to spend more time off the stage without a microphone pitting with the crowd and embracing his audience was memorable and he was rewarded by being lifted and carried around during the conclusion of what was an excellent set. It’s hard not to see the potential these men carry by their efforts, they left it all on the stage and put their heart into their audience, who returned the favour with passion and an unspoken promise that their attendance would be assured at any other date Continents have in Hull and for my part, I do hope it is soon. [4/5]

Sonny Rust