Archive for Dies Irae

Narcotic Death part ways with guitarist

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on 28th September 2013 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

The grim bastards of the north, Narcotic Death, recently announced their split with guitarist Mass. The band have made it clear that Mass‘ departure from the band was on good terms and that they appreciate his contributions to the band. Narcotic Death also stated that they will commit to all their upcoming shows as a four piece outfit and as such, they are also on the scout for a new guitarist.

Applicants must be willing to commit to two rehearsals a week, have an interest in the music and a willingness to contribute towards songwriting. Applicants must also have competence and confidence with regards to playing rhythm and lead guitar within the death metal genre and must own their own cab and head. Further details can be found here.

Narcotic Death online:

http://facebook.com/NarcoticDeath
http://youtube.com/user/NarcoticDeathMetal

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Interview with Alex Cook [Narcotic Death]

Posted in Interview with tags , , , , , on 29th January 2013 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

 

Narcotic Death have left a trail of horror and destruction in the five years they’ve been on the UK’s extreme metal scene and at one point, even boasted My Dying Bride’s violinist/keyboardist Shaun MacGowan amongst their ranks. With their new album, Dies Irae, currently in the works, Narcotic Death‘s vocalist Alex Cook sits down with Valkyrian Music’s editor, Nico, to reveal the grizzly details about the new album and what devious plans the band have in store for the masses.

Nico: What’s the meaning behind the band’s name, Narcotic Death?

Alex: The band name is open to interpretation. For me, it illustrates the soothing capacity of euthanasia and a slow, sleeping death through the injecting of narcotic substances. A seduction of the living senses to dying. Death is something that we all fear in mortal capacity, and perhaps it is wrong to do so, because it is through that fear that we hold on too long and subject our bodies and minds to degradation. If we were more accepting, the journey would be easier; life would be more fulfilling, and grieving less painful.

Nico: You’ve been working on the new album, Dies Irae, what are the prominent themes of the album?

Alex: Warped religious ideals, debauchery, cynicism and punishment. Some of the songs on the album are re-workings of religious tales. Rain is about a deluge from Heaven that drowns humankind. The Accuser is about Christ and the Devil discussing how the religious experiment has failed because even Christ himself cannot endure the torments he inflicts on human kind and The Butcher and the Scribe details a plague upon mankind sent by Heaven’s destroying angels. The other tracks, such a Gorgon and Throne of Stars use humanity’s ignorance and worthlessness as themes.

Nico: Dies Irae is Latin for “Day of Wrath”. Why did you choose this to be the title of the album?

Alex: To incorporate the religious themes and also to highlight how humanity has failed itself and awaits some form of punishment. Religion is an excuse, and our ignorance is too for turning a blind eye and idealising our stained living conditions. The title track Dies Irae embodies these themes most obviously by approaching the matter of child abuse within the church and the casual indifference of the masses because of the power religion still possesses. ‘Intelligence insists the absence of religion, the wholesomeness of our existence, chained to our decay. A man that cannot control himself is no longer free. They know this. They have always known.’ Overall, the title is an embodiment of the main notion within the album; that one day soon, our evils will come back to haunt us, and when it does, we will blame others, but it is ourselves who are guilty.

Nico: What song do you feel will be the strongest track on the album?

Alex: My personal favourite is Cainite because it is laden with doom and suffocating misery. You lose yourself in those sweeping riffs, and the lyrics are chant-like in places to illustrate the character’s despair. It tells a biblical story from another point of view, and this is something I greatly enjoyed doing with most of the tracks on the album. You are taught them one way, but when you look more deeply, there is only darkness and a sordid idealism. The Butcher and the Scribe is probably the strongest track, because of its subject matter and crushing, aggressive guitar riffs and drum patterns. Every member shines on that track, but the others all have distinct qualities of their own whether it be an impending sense of doom, visceral terror or disgust and fury.

Nico: Narcotic Death have played a fair share of gigs and obviously with a number of different bands, which bands have you enjoyed gigging with the most?

Alex: Our gigging history is quite a lengthy one, but I think Severed Heaven are a band that we have known and admired for a very long time; we played our second ever gig with them, and our most recent one, so they are a band that we have grown with. They’re a delightful group of ladies, and it is difficult not to be taken in by them and their unique ‘chug’.

Nico: How will Dies Irae differ from previous Narcotic Death releases?

Alex: I think that the new album will show a degree of maturity both with regards to technique and song writing. Our intention is a lot clearer here than it was with the other releases, and I think that makes for a stronger, more memorable impression. The other releases, our EP for instance was honest, but had a lot of different styles on it; there wasn’t a sound distinctly ours, and the first album was more or less the same due to line-up changes. It has taken five years to develop a sound that is true and recognisable as ours, and that has as much to do with people that have left the line-up as the ones that are still here. Everybody left a scar somewhere.

Nico: How has the experience of recording Dies Irae gone so far?

Alex: Very well. Going in the studio is always a daunting time for any musician, but I am proud of what has been accomplished so far. As of this time, I have yet to go and record my voKILLS, but I have been redrafting my lyrics and planning out the different sections so the sound will be visceral and terrifying with a multitude of layers. Appropriate for such layered and traumatic subject matter. I want the music to be felt as well as heard.

Nico: As it’s still early in the year, what lies in store for Narcotic Death throughout 2013?

Alex: More acquaintances to be made, more countries to be seen and more people to be terrified into submission. First and foremost, is to get the album released so we have something to show for ourselves at any future gigs. We are also hoping to shoot a music video for one of the tracks; a Narcotic Death first that will undoubtedly be a great experience, as well as something to show off and express our madness through.

Nico: If you could take any poem or other piece of literature and turn into a piece of music, which one would it be and why?

Alex: Paradise Lost by [John] Milton would be an excellent choice, just for how the tale twists and turns from awe of heaven, to grief and anger at being cast out, as well as wonder and bereavement at walking on earth. It is hopelessly romantic, melancholic and sincere. Imagine soundscapes, maybe with just a few whispered phrases. For a work like that with such power, words are not needed to express what it is trying to say.

Nico: Describe Narcotic Death‘s sound in five or less words.

Alex: Traumatic visceral Swedish-esque near-death experience.

Nico: If you replace the soundtrack to any film with your own music, which one would it be and why?

Alex: Perhaps one of the Universal classics, such as Dracula or Frankenstein. That era of film was a realm unto itself, and our music would add to their sinister edge, or be complemented by the strange, but beautiful images on screen. 

Nico: Are there any bands you’d like to recommend to our readers?

Alex: Severed Heaven for glorious chugging riffs and painful vocals. Ebony Lake for a surreal, tormenting sound stupor. Nightshadows Lament for classic, doom soaked black metal.

Nico: Do you have anything to say our readers?

Alex: Thank you very much for reading and expressing an interest in our sinister cynicism. I hope that the misery we breed will live on in you, and in turn, infect others. I hope too, that I will be able to meet you at one of our gigs, and that you will be heartily traumatised by all we have to offer.

You can follow Narcotic Death at the following locations:

https://www.facebook.com/narcoticdeath
http://www.myspace.com/narcoticdeath616