Archive for blackmetal

Foscor release entire back catalogue digitally

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , on 6th March 2014 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Dark metallers Foscor have released their entire back catalogue digitally, including the band’s first three albums: 2004’s Entrance to the Shadows’ Village,  2007’s The Smile of the Sad Ones and 2009’s Groans to the Guilty. Each album includes lyrics and information. For the first month, the albums will be available for free download from this location. The band’s back catalogue is also available for streaming on YouTube.

With over a decade in the music scene, Foscor recently announced that the band’s natural musical progression and development has led to a change in style away from the traditional 90’s Black Metal mixed with other classical and modern extreme styles, for which they became know.  Breaking free from the restrictions the genre places on bands has enabled Foscor to expand their sound to include shades of Doom and Dark Rock, majestic interludes and a healthy flirtation with Prog.  Frontman Fiar is quick to point out though that fans will still recognise the distinctive Foscor style, which the band have not rejected, but have made better, and which will be very much in evidence in the band’s newly completed  fourth full-length album Those Horrors Wither.

Currently in search of a label for Those Horrors Wither, Foscor have chosen a somewhat unusual direction with the guest appearances on the album.  Instead of the expected vocals or instrumental solos, the notable guests have written and performed connecting passages between the tracks.

Foscor online:

http://foscor.com
http://facebook.com/foscor.official
http://soundcloud.com/foscor
http://twitter.com/FOSCOR_Official
http://youtube.com/user/FOSCORbcn
http://foscor.bigcartel.com
http://myspace.com/foscor
http://reverbnation.com/foscor

 

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Old Corpse Road confirmed to support Hecate Enthroned at Bridlington show

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , on 13th December 2013 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

British folklore-inspired black metallers Old Corpse Road have been confirmed to support Hecate Enthroned at their first show in East Yorkshire in over three years. The show will take place at Basement in Bridlington on 17th May 2014 with more support acts to be confirmed. Tickets are available for £6 from this location.

Old Corpse Road online:

http://oldcorpseroad.co.uk
http://facebook.com/oldcorpseroad

Hecate Enthroned – Virulent Rapture

Posted in CD, Metal with tags , , , , , , , , , on 12th December 2013 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Hecate Enthroned
Virulent Rapture
Released 25th November 2013
Symphonic Black Metal
Released via Crank Music

Anyone know follows the British black metal scene will have no doubt encountered the legendary, if somewhat unsung, heroes of the scene: Hecate Enthroned. Following the release of Redimus in 2004, the band have remained fairly quiet – or as quiet as you can possibly get when playing black metal. However, following their recent pact with Italian label Crank Music, Hecate Enthroned are set to rise again.

The eerie orchestration of Thrones Of Shadow acts as the beginning of the ritual that is Virulent Rapture. The haunting orchestration leads into the fierce wailing guitars and bestial vocals, as the keyboard passages create a Poe-like atmosphere that glides gently between the crushing use of guitars, bass and drums and the hate-flavoured vocals. Unchained sees the waves of Plutonian darkness continue to flood forth from the snarling guitars and hypnotic keyboard medleys whereas the bass and drums are more thunderous and barbaric, creating a perfect contrast.

The introduction of Abyssmal March creates an atmospheric mood, painted with varying Cimmerian shades but the unrelenting charge of the heavier instrumentation rushes in, leading a vicious use of screams and Hadean keyboard medleys. Plagued By Black Death features a melancholy piano passage which dances like a spirit at dance macabre with the vocals and guitars in a certain, almost seductive manner portraying beauty and a bestial nature in one vessel. Euphoria explodes in like a volcano, domineering one’s hearing with a visceral assault of guitars and drums and some heavy punches from the vocals. The guitars whip out melodic passages, which are accompanied by a mystifying layer of orchestration.

Virulent Rapture is a flood of guitars on a biblical scale of proportions, leaving nothing but a path of ruin and devastation – and probably some sore necks as well – in its wake. The hypnotic orchestration does little to sooth the destructive nature of the song, in fact, it enhances it in a dark and ethereal manner. The one calm during in the storm is produced by the haunting guest vocals of Sarah Jezebel Deva who adds an enchanting element to the song. Life comes across as more of a gothic doom anthem, lending an obsessive, memorable and augural sound through the shadowy voices of the guitars and illusory keyboards. The stern use of bestial vocals do contrast away from the music, employing a strong black metal element there.

The alarming riffs of To Wield The Hand Of Perdition leave no room for mercy as they tear their way through the song like wolves hunting their prey. The vocals are formidable at each turn, while the rhythm sections made up by a terrifying assault of drums and bass, alongside the keyboards, strengthen the track. Of Witchery And The Blood Moon, a title that rings true to the band’s name, is somber in its presentation, painting an image of an unrelenting arctic winds, leaving only a cold trail of wintry enchantments. Immateria is a break from the fierce snapping of riffs, lyrical war cries and barbaric percussion assaults, taking the listen sailing down a more gentle river of memorable medleys until Path Of Silence unleashes a storm of deathly riffs and vocals sharp enough to cut steel in two. The percussion and bass falls down heavier than a ton of bricks, finishing off the devastation left by the previous tracks. The keyboards and orchestration finalise the black metal incantations, keeping the band’s signature sound unscathed throughout the chaos.

Raise your horns and bend your knees. The kings of British black metal, Hecate Enthroned, have returned with a masterpiece that has not only become a complete evolution of their sound but proves that they are one of the best bands on the scene and they certainly show no signs of abdicating from their throne just yet.

Nico Davidson

5/5

Hecate Enthroned online:

http://hecateenthroned.com
http://facebook.com/hecateenthroned

 

Foscor complete new album and prepare for new era in band’s history

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , on 25th November 2013 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

When dark metal outfit Foscor celebrated the tenth anniversary in 2012, they not only celebrated a decade of music but drew a line under an era in their history leading them to prepare for when they embark on the next ambitious one. With work on Foscor’s fourth full-length album now completed, and a complete visual overhaul of their online presence and logo, the groundwork for the new phase in the band’s career is well and truly established.

Formed in 1997 in Barcelona, in the Catalan region of Spain, Foscor took the traditional ‘90s Black Metal and mixed it with other classical and modern extreme styles to create a sound that has seen them through the release of 3 full-length albums, a live DVD commemorating their 10th Anniversary, 2 split releases and contributions on official Katatonia and Enslaved tribute albums, all of which have garnered them respect and a solid, and ever-growing, following.  Now, with their forthcoming album, which will be titled Those Horrors Wither, Foscor have honed their considerable musical skills and decided to take the first gigantic step away from the confines of Black Metal, towards an expansive multidimensional sound that encompasses shades of Doom and Dark Rock, Ambient interludes and a healthy flirtation with Prog.  It is a step that most clearly defines the band’s personal approach to their work, both musically and aesthetically, to date.

Commenting on the new sound and the new image of Foscor, founder and guitarist Falke and frontman Fiar had this to say:

It’s really not that strange that we would be moving in a different direction from the one we started out on because it’s a natural progression that comes from experience.  We’re not saying that our long-time fans will wake up one morning and not recognise FOSCOR any more, not at all, because we have a particular style that is recognisable as FOSCOR – but we’ve taken that style and made it into something better.  You could say that the new FOSCOR is evolution, not revolution, and, that being said, it actually needs new colours to define how we interpret Darkness, and Ideophony, who has previously worked with us on design, is the perfect partner to work with us now in physically visualising our new direction.

Foscor are currently looking for a label to release Those Horrors Wither, which includes some notable guest artists, who, somewhat unusually, rather than contributing the usual vocals or solos, have written and performed connecting passages between the tracks.  More information about Foscor can be found on the band’s website, which has been newly designed, at this location.

Foscor online:

http://www.foscor.com
http://www.facebook.com/foscor.official
http://soundcloud.com/foscor
http://twitter.com/FOSCOR_Official
http://www.youtube.com/user/FOSCORbcn
http://foscor.bigcartel.com
http://www.myspace.com/foscor
http://www.reverbnation.com/foscor

 

Interview with Erik Grawsiö (Månegarm)

Posted in Interview with tags , , , , , , , on 4th July 2013 by izaforestspirit

 photo group2-scaled_zps2190a9fe.jpg

The Swedish Viking black metal group Månegarm is one of the most unique and diverse bands in the scene. Iza caught up with their singer Erik Grawsiö to discuss the new album Legions of the North, Viking mythology, line-up changes and movie soundtracks.

Iza: Hi Erik!

Erik Grawsiö: Hello!

I: I’ve read that Månegarm refers to a wolf in Norse mythology that swallows the moon at Ragnarok. Could you explain why you chose that particular name and what it means to you as a band?

E: Yes, that’s right! We had another name when we first started up the band but after only 1-2 months we changed to Månegarm. Jonas was the one who found it and we all thought that it was a better name for the band (than the earlier name) especially since we sang in Swedish about the Norse mythology. The wolf for me is a powerful animal that stands for strength, pride and wisdom. “ It’s better to live one day as a WOLF (originally: lion) than a thousand years as a lamb”.

I: Your music is an interesting mix of styles ranging from black metal, Viking metal with some folk and pagan influences. Which of these styles would you say represents Månegarm‘s music the best?

E: I don’t know really… When people ask I usually just say that we play “metal” or Rock n’ roll. We’re definitely more of a metal band than a folk band but I think that Månegarm‘s music is represented by all of these styles that you mentioned. The diversity and mixture is the strength of Månegarm I think.


I
: What are your thoughts on the tag ‘Viking metal’? Does the genre exist in your opinion? Should it exist?

E: We don’t care much for tags and labels at all. When we started playing this kind of “metal” there were no Viking or pagan or Viking/folk metal; it was just us and a couple of other bands that played the kind of music that we enjoyed playing. This is no problem for us though and if these tags/labels help people get a better picture of a band or categorizing bands, then it is fine by me. The problem nowadays is maybe that there are like thousands of sub-genres/labels and that just makes it all confusing. Let’s put it this way; people can call our music what the f**k they want as long as they like it!!

I: Are there any bands in the Swedish metal scene that interest you? If so, which ones and why?

E: No.

I: Let’s talk a bit about the new album Legions of The North. Was there any specific inspiration for this album or any particular themes that you wanted to portray?

E: No, there is no stated concept or theme that runs through the album but if I remember correctly we first had the idea of a theme which was pretty much “death” from different points of view. Even if we didn’t follow that path totally it maybe stayed in our minds on a both conscious and an unconscious level, because almost all songs came to deal with war and death in different ways, influenced by the Nordic mythology. photo Erik_zpse9c17607.jpg

I: Some of the instrumental tracks on there such as Vigverk sound like old folk songs? What are they based on?

E: Vigverk is a short instrumental piece that can be seen as an intro to the following song Sons of War. The name Vigverk comes from Eddan and can be translated into something like “great deeds” or “great achievement” in English. It is no traditional old folk song; it’s just a song that I wrote since I wanted to have some shorter acoustic tracks on the album.

I: Legions of the North is your 7th album. How do you think it compares to its predecessors, particularly the last one Nattväsen?

E: I think it sort of continues on the same path as Nattväsen but we have worked more on the arrangements and the structure of the songs and especially we have put a lot of effort on the refrains on this album. On the earlier albums (like the first 1-2 albums) our “composing strategy” was to sit down with the guitars, put a bunch of riffs together in a descent way and yep… We had a song!! That’s maybe quite charming and cool in a way but today I think that we “think” music in a better and more serious way and we try to compose “real” songs!

I: Your violin player Janne Liljekvist left the band last year before the album was completed. Has this had any effect on the recording process or the way the album turned out?

E: The biggest effect on the recording process was that the new violin player (Martin Björklund who is a friend of Jakob‘s) only needed 1.5 days in the studio to get all violin parts done instead of Janne who often needed 3-4 days… Janne didn’t write any songs in Månegarm; it’s Jonas and I who write the songs and it’s usually me that writes the melodies for guitar and violin, so him leaving didn’t have any effect on the final result I think.

I: If Månegarm could play a show anywhere in the world without any restrictions, where would you choose and why?

E: I would like our own festival; “Månegarm Open Air” or something like that. It would be cool to start off in a small scale and then turn it into the greatest festival ever!! That’s quite a dream uhh… but you said without any restrictions.

I: If you could replace the sound track to any movie with your music, which one would it be and why?

E: I know it’s a long shot but maybe some of our songs from our acoustic album Urminnes Hävd – The Forest Sessions could serve as a nice soundtrack to a scene in The Lord of the Rings. I don’t know which song would be best and I don’t know for which scene, but when I listen to that album and seeing these films I get sort of the same feelings and emotions…epic freedom, mysticism, grief, joy and emotions like that. I better call Peter Jackson right away!!

I: Do you have any final words for our readers and your fans?

E: Keep your eyes and ears open for our new album Legions of the North! You just can’t miss it, it’s a killer!!! See you all on the road!!

Månegarm online:

http://www.facebook.com/Manegarmsweden/
http://www.deaf-dumb.com/manegarm
http://www.manegarmsweden.com
http://www.myspace.com/manegarm
http://www.youtube.com/Manegarmofficial

 

Germanic metallers Fjoergyn confirmed for Warhorns 2013

Posted in News with tags , , , , , on 16th June 2013 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

With a line-up that is already boasting some the UK’s and Europe’s finest underground folk, Viking and black metal acts such Old Corpse Road, Maelstrom, Dothborgia, Kull and many more, the epic Teutonic metal band Fjoergyn have been confirmed for the second edition of the Warhorns Festival that will take place in York on Friday 27th and Saturday 28th September.

Tickets, for this month only, are priced at the same price last year:

£19 – WEEKEND
£6 – FRIDAY DAY TICKET
£15 – SATURDAY DAY TICKET

Further details on the festival can be found at this location.

Fjoergyn online:

http://www.fjoergyn.com/
https://www.facebook.com/Fjoergynofficial/