Archive for Alive

Interview: Lee Rule [2011]

Posted in Interview with tags , , , , , on 5th July 2011 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

We sit down and speak with the “Lord of Brutality” Lee Rule about his up and coming “release “Alive” and other projects.

Nico: Hello. Thanks for taking the time to chat with us today.

Lee: It’s fine, man. Anytime, anytime. It’s all good.

N: It was recently announced that you’re bringing out a new release “Alive” under your name rather than the Obsolete Tomorrow name. Is there any reason for this?

L: I was thinking at first of having it under the Obsolete moniker but I think it would be best on a different name because I think that Obsolete Tomorrow should be kept quite heavy. I think if I had brought out a softer album under that name it would have, maybe, confused a lot of people and might have put a lot of people of the next album which is out soon. So yeah, I decided it would be best under a separate name just to keep the two genres separate. That’s the main reason for it anyway.

N: Is there any lyrical concept behind “Alive” or is it like each track has a different concept [both lyrically and musically]?

L: There’s actually not a lot of lyrics at all on the album to be fair. It’s more of an instrumental album. I think there’s maybe one song that has some lyrics but there’s not really a great deal, to be quite honest with ya. The album is just very chilled, atmospheric sort of album. It’s not heavy or anything. It’s quite progressive and I’m experimenting quite a lot more with different instrumentation as well. So it’s not based all around one instrument. There’s a lot of orchestration and a lot of drums and percussion and not really a great deal of electronic instruments. There’s quite a lot of flutes as well which is quite weird for me.

N: [laughter] Nothing wrong with the flutes. What would you say was the main inspiration for this new release [Alive] then?

L: I’ve always been interested in writing something a bit more relaxed but I could never really get into that frame of mind until last week when I was in America. I was sat in the airport and I was quite surprisingly calm during that situation which was quite strange. Just seeing loads of people rushing around, stressing over which flight they’re trying to get. It was just weird to see, there was me just on my own, chilled out and everyone else is going mental. Then I thought, well people need to chill out a bit, so maybe I should write some chilled out music to try help them chill.

N: Has this been a different sort of experience for you compared to what you previously did with the “Beauty Through Chaos” album for Obsolete Tomorrow?

L: Yeah, it’s been a completely different experience really. Obsolete Tomorrow [Beauty Through Chaos], I wrote that very quickly. I’m surprised at how fast I wrote, it was a quite fast paced writing style – I probably wrote a song once a day kind of thing and got it finished within maybe a month. This one is a much more relaxed approach. The song structures aren’t very consistent. It’s very progressive, there’s not really an intro, verse, chorus, it’s more like one big instrumental along with different sections of stuff. Like I was saying, there’s a lot of atmospherics on it and once I get that down as a bass line, it chills me out as well ‘cause I can sit back and experience that as I’m writing the next part like a flute bit or something.

N: You have another album in the works, a more Zombie Metal orientated album based on the concept of a zombie apocalypse. Is there any reason for this? And will it be like a musical?

L: I wouldn’t say it’s a musical at all, it’s more like a film without the picture really. Just a big epic soundtrack to it – Every other song is like a skit with the voice actors doing their part. After that sort of scene or skit, there’ll be a song that will cover that skit. It’s just so over the top, it’s unreal. In the skits, we got stuff like chainsaws going off and people going crazy.

N: Sounds like it’s going to be a very interesting album.

L: I hope it will be.

N: You’re working on a lot of different albums [such as The Burden of Forever and Theatre Of The Damned] and you recently helped to produce the recent EP from Driffield based band The Dials and you’re a university student as well and you run your own record label [Xeroxed Records]. Where do you find the time to actually be able to do all this?

L: I had to quit my job to be able to manage this year’s scale of things I’m trying to do. As cliché as it sounds, I have my hands in a lot of pies at the moment. I’m pretty much covering every genre of music possible and every sort of aspect of the business. I work quite weirdly, I can’t just work on one project at a time. I’ve got to do something else as well just to keep myself sane. I think that’s the reason why I started writing “Alive” as I was doing that zombie thing. It’s more chilled out while the zombie one is very complicated, there’s a lot of stuff going on in it, so I just needed something to sit back and relax on. It p*sses of my neighbours and my mum ‘cause I’m just constantly in my studio making noise. [Laughter]. But I’m sure after the next few months, when the next few albums [Alive and Theatre Of The Damned] are finished, I’ll keep it down a bit and just chill.

N: With your future albums, be them under the Obsolete moniker or your own name, do you have any plans to tour in support of them or just have a release show?

L: I’d love to, I really would. I think my only problem with that is jut being able to be a decent frontman – Obviously it’s my voice on the album but doing it live is a completely different thing. I’ve never really been a frontman in a band since I was about 13. I’m sure if we got enough practise in we could do it – I’ve got a band together for the Obsolete Tomorrow album [Beauty Through Chaos]. It’s some friends but we’ve never practised anything yet but it’s there just in case we do need to tour or something but yeah, I’d love to it. As of yet there’s no real plans. There might be a surprise show in October but I’ll have to see how that works out. Everything is just studio based at the moment but I think once I’ve got more songs under my belt, I could put on quite a long show. I don’t think I’d go on a full tour though, maybe a few shows first and then just build it up there.

N: That sounds like quite a sound plan. For the Obsolete Tomorrow album [Beauty Through Chaos], you’ve stated before that it’s based on a rough part in your life. Would you say that writing the album changed you emotionally? Or spiritually even?

L: Definitely! I think if I was younger, having been through that situation and not being able to write or record music, I would have taken away the anger another way like going on a massive binge with my mates. But writing the album made me understand that there are better ways of using that energy, rather than wasting it, just make it into something positive. It was quite a weird sort of experience, writing the album ‘cause it was emotionally draining because I had to go through all those situations over and over again in my head to try and capture the emotion I was going through which was quite draining but I think it came off alright. I hope anyway. After I finished it, I felt nothing but pure happiness.

N: You’re quite involved with the local music scene, are there any bands that you’ recommend to our readers? Be they metal rock, electronica, are there any musicians that you’d suggest they’d keep their eye out for?

L: Absolutely! In Hull, especially, there’s a lot of bands like Pastel Jack, Infernal Creation, stuff like that. Obviously there’s the two bands I’m working with, Windrider and Ravenage. I think Hull has got a lot of talent right now, it’s quite promising to see. In Driffield, there’s a few bands but they all kinda stick with one genre of music. I don’t know if they’re afraid to do their own thing but I think they need to branch out a bit more. There’s one band that’s really good called “Parkmoor”. They’re like a hard rock band.

N: Sounds good, sounds good. That’s all really. Thanks again for taking the time to speak to with us today, Lee And good luck with your future albums.

L: Anytime, man, anytime. Take care.

Advertisements