Sirenia–The Seventh Life Path

Sirenia
The Seventh Life Path
Released 8th May 2015
Symphonic/Gothic Metal
Released via Napalm Records

Norway is the perfect setting for the dusk-coloured symphonies written by Sirenia. Following on from jump to Napalm Records, the band announced the release of The Seventh Life Path, the follow-up to their previous album which was released via Nuclear Blast.

The Seventh Life Path begins slow with the track Seti, painting a crepuscular image in the mind of the listener with a tragic choir and a solemn orchestration. Serpent has a chilling introduction with what sounds to be the twisted speech of children before waves of guitars and symphonic sounds come crashing down with Ailyn’s haunting voice sailing atop them. Morten’s harsher demonstration of vocals adds the final piece to the twilit essence of the song. Once My Light sees an interesting use of synths in work, melding with the howls of Morten’s and Jan’s guitars. The song has it calmer passages that allow for smooth sailing between the raging flurries of guitars and drums.

The guitars on Elixir sound dignified and imposing, giving the track a far more august atmosphere. The use of clean vocals as well as choirs and the occasional bestial snarls deliver a fresh course of unrelenting misty notes. Sons of the North stands out prominently, like a peacock in shades of Gothic colours seeking a new mate. The first verse, growled by Morten, describe a cold, unforgiving setting which is perfect for the song. The symphonies that are placed ever so masterfully in this track are sharp, and biting, as if they were shards of ice falling from the darkening skies during a wintry storm.

Earendel explodes with fierce lashes from the guitars and powerful, lyrical orchestral notes. Ailyn’s and Morten’s vocals are virtually poetic throughout this track, displaying why they make such dynamic partners on the microphone. Consealed Disdain frequents the use of technical compositions that chart the way for the rest of the track, especially the venom-laced screams and the calculated riffs. Insania – which fortunately isn’t a cover of that awful Peter Andre song – isn’t as heavy as other tracks on the album but it still bludgeons the listener with raging guitars that would put even the Hulk to shame and intricate orchestration. Contemptuous Quitus is a melodic track, summoning forth a tactful placement of notes and harmonies, to create a shroud of thick darkness that only Sirenia can pull off. The piano medleys blend in an awe-inspiring manner between the other instruments, sealing the track together into one magnificent musical portrait.

The Silver Eye sails the album towards its end with an introductory of a cluster of everything, ranging from the vicious execution of the guitars to the dual vocals. After that storm, the song eases into smoother sailing, allowing each element its chance to be heard. Sirenia make port with the final track of the album, Tragedienne, a song that weeps with heartbreaking sounds as the chilling vocals of Ailyn are heard within. The piano medley that floats throughout the track offers up a bleak sense of emotion as each note gently steps away.

Sirenia have been on the scene for a number of years now and The Seventh Life Path is possibly one of the greatest albums to be have been recorded within symphonic metal. It offers up a range of elements from the gothic to the mysterious as well as a number of Cimmerian emotions. The musicianship is flawless and the vocals are mesmerising. Forget this being the album of the year, this deserves to be album of the decade.

5/5

Nico Solheim-Davidson

Sirenia online:

http://sirenia.no

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