Archive for June, 2011

Dry Pilot – Dry Pilot [2011]

Posted in CD, Rock with tags , , , , , on 28th June 2011 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Band: Dry Pilot
Album: Dry Pilot EP
Release year: 2011
Genre: Progressive Rock

Dry Pilot are a Leeds-based progressive rock band with all three members originating from Brildington, East Yorkshire. Though being a fairly young band, they have risen to acclaim in the Leeds underground music scene. Their self-titled debut EP is the first in what is hopefully a long line of releases.

The EP begins with “The Need For Money”, a song title that a lot of people can relate to. The beginning section is a genius mixture of guitars and impressive drum work. The vocals are strong but not overly powerful, which is fortunate. The riffs become slightly more technical as the song progresses yet staying simplistic at the same time. Already the EP is at a great start which does beg the question, can the rest of the EP live up to “The Need For Money”. ”Bended Knee” comes next with the answer and that answer is… Yes! It begins with more a funky kind of riff which will no doubt make people want to get up and dance along. Again, the vocals are powerful and the drums are precise to the beat. As the song progresses, it just gets better and better.

“Transparent” has a more drum orientated introduction which is soon accompanied by the bass and guitar. The riffs are intelligently played, blending well with the technicality of the drums and bass, making for a truly superior track. The vocals bring a very emotional feel to the track as well. This one is certainly the best one of the EP. The EP comes to end with “See Me, I’m Gone” which just carries on the musical genius found on the other tracks. The riffs are well composed and the drum sections are brilliant. “See Me, I’m Gone” is certainly chart topping material.

The debut release of any band is usually the defining factor of how well a band will fare in the future. Well, Dry Pilot are certainly going to fare brilliantly in the future. This EP is proof of it. Each track is better than the last, combining strong vocals with genius riffs and great drum work. Dry Pilot are clearly a band to keep an eye – and ear – out for. On stage or on recordings, there are a band that impresses!

5/5

Nico Davidson

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Army of the Universe – Mother Ignorance [2011]

Posted in CD, Industrial on 28th June 2011 by Fireclown

Band: Army of the Universe
Album: Mother Ignorance
Release year: 2011
Genre: Industrial / Electronic / Rock

All I can say is, “Thank goodness”.  This band has members coming from different genres of music and has produced, what I would call, a proper Industrial album.

We have Albert Vorne who is a master of Techno/Trance with his synthesizers.  An amazing lead singer from “Kult of the Skull God”, Lord K.  Davil, who manipulates guitars into sounds only the distortion gods know of. To top these skills and their names, this has been mixed by the well renowned Chris Vrenna who won a Grammy Award as a member of Nine Inch Nails.

I love Industrial music and listen to it most of the time.  Recently I have found there have been a lot of bands releasing music that they like to call Industrial.  Most of this music has been what I would call Rave/Metal.  This is not Rave/Metal, this is the beginning of Industrial music returning to its glory days.

The overture of “Mother Ignorance,” the name of the album, is a simple synthesizer beat which breaks into distortion, then the guitar and drums get to work on an amazing grind.  It’s a tune that makes you move, makes you want to listen.  This song sets the pace for the rest of the album.

“Love Dead”, their second song, is obviously influenced by NiN.  The song has a slow grind until the Chorus which breaks out into a synthetic piano tune underlying distortion.  This song is nothing but “Classic” Industrial music.

The interesting thing about this band is that they don’t stick with the same style of Industrial music.  “Goodnight” isn’t like “Love Dead” the previous song; it’s got more of a “Depeche Mode” influence.  I don’t mean “Depeche Mode” from the early 80’s, I’m taking about when they were doing their darker music in 94`.  The song starts with a strong, dare I say, “dance beat” and with a light hearted piano sound overlaying.  In moments of the song starting however the guitar kicks into action and everything becomes apparent this is not a simple song of light beats but beats with a breath taking grind of metal.

The Vocals throughout the album reminisces of “Billy Idol”.  The voice is light when needed for certain songs but has the power to thrash out the yell.  Perfect for the sound in which this band has created.

One song will always stick out for me in this LP.  It’s the cover of “Björk’s,” “Army of Me”.  I love the original and the cover that Helmet did in the 90’s but to have a band make an Industrial version of the song, it made me very happy.  This version of the song has the right amount of dryness at the start of the song which reminds you of desolation.  The pounding of the synthesiser drives onto the chorus which in turn takes you to another level of the song.

Although I have said that this band has created an amazing Industrial sound I also think they are at a junction of musical differences.  I can hear the Industrial pounds and grinds of bands like, “NiN,” “Gravity Kills” and “Rico” but I can also hear sounds that are different but potentially compatible like, “Depeche Mode” and “SONOIO”.

I certainly think this band will be one too listen to in the future and has a long future ahead of them.  They may struggle with their differences in musical direction but again this could be a pleasant mix of genre which will revitalise the Industrial scene and take it back from the Rave/Metal scene which calls themselves Industrial.

4/5

Alistair ‘Fireclown’ Law

Interview: Graeme Farmer [2011]

Posted in Interview with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 27th June 2011 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Nico sits down and has an exclusive interview with Graeme Farmer of Lancastrian black metal outfit WOLFTHORN to discuss the up-and-coming album and other things.

Nico: Greetings Graeme. Thanks for taking the time to speak with us today. The band [Wolfthorn] recently stated on their official Facebook that there’s a full length album in the making. How’s that going for you guys?

Graeme: Cheers mate, thanks for the opportunity to chat and for showing interest in the band! The album is coming along very nicely, thanks. The bulk of it was recorded in Lancaster during the first few months of 2011. At the minute I’m just re-recording some of the lead and acoustic guitar parts at home, and adding small things like keyboard tracks. After that, it’s just a case of mixing and mastering etc, so with any luck it will be released by the autumn. It contains a mix of brand new songs and songs that have been a staple of our live shows for some time, but which were not recorded for the EP. The title of the album will be The Cold Descent of Eternal Winter. I’d say on the whole that it will be a darker, heavier and more progressive record than Echoes was, with the lyrical content continuing to focus on the people, places and events that helped shape the history of the British isles. There’s also a couple of nature-inspired tracks, which is something we haven’t touched upon much before.

N: In regards to the keyboard sections on some of the tracks, will some of the tracks be more symphonic heavy or will the keyboard sections just be there for a more atmospheric effect?

G: They’re there to add atmosphere to the tracks primarily. We don’t have a keyboard player in the band, so we were very conscious that if the keyboard tracks were too prominent the songs would sound totally different when we came to perform them live. We used some synth tracks in Twilight in Valinor and Sworn in Blood on the EP and felt they worked quite well, so they’ll appear in a few more songs on the album, but they’re very much there to thicken out certain riffs rather than to become a dominant element in the song.

N: That’s good then. When the album is out, do you all plan to tour in support of it or just play a big release show in Lancaster?

G: That depends if people in other towns want to see us play! We haven’t played much outside the north west as of yet, but that’s certainly something we’re looking to change. There will almost certainly be some sort of release show in Lancaster though, and I imagine the ale will be flowing! Playing live has been difficult this year as I’ve been living a long way away from the rest of the band and working a job that involves working evenings, so our show at The Flapper in Birmingham on July 30th will actually be our first gig of 2011! But I’m moving jobs in a few weeks, and I’m hoping to be in a position to move back to Lancaster soon, so if all goes to plan so should be able to play live a lot more often before too long. Playing live is by far the most enjoyable aspect of being in a band, so for me personally it’s been something I’ve missed doing a lot these last few months.

N: On the note of live music and gigs, how would you describe the music scene in Lancashire? Are there any bands you’d recommend people to see? Aside from Wolfthorn, obviously.

G: Lancaster always surprised me in that for a small town it has a very large and varied music scene. There are a number of pubs in the city centre that regularly put on live bands, and people in general are very enthusiastic about music. I’m talking music in general here, and not specifically metal. We often see people at our shows that you wouldn’t expect to be into extreme metal, and I’ve always been really impressed by people’s willingness to support local music regardless of genre or style. There’s also a large music scene in nearby Preston that’s worth mentioning too. In terms of bands from the area I’d suggest to others, there are a couple that spring to mind. Firstly, our guitarist Andy would be extremely unhappy if I didn’t use this opportunity to plug his other band, Consecrated Flesh. You owe me a pint if you’re reading this mate! They play a more extreme form of black metal than Wolfthorn, incorporating influences from German thrash bands like Kreator and Sodom. They released a new demo a week or two ago, which is well worth checking out. They’re a band that have come on a lot in the last few years, and are well worth seeing live as well. Their guitar player Will is actually responsible for the recording and mixing of the upcoming Wolfthorn album! And secondly, as a massive fan of traditional Heavy Metal and the NWOBHM sound in particular, I’d highly recommend a local band called Eliminator who are probably my favourite band from the area. Wolfthorn’s first ever gig was opening for them back in 2008, and they’re well worth checking out if you’re a fan of bands like Heavy Load, Gotham City and Sortilege.

N: You mentioned earlier that the upcoming album will be focusing on events and people in British history that helped to shape said history. Is there any reason particular reason for this or is it just one of those things that just happened while writing the songs?

G: Believe it or not, when I started the band I was going for a sort of “grim and frostbitten” vibe and we had songs about Satan and Elizabeth Bathory and stuff like that! It didn’t last long though, as I realised it was totally insincere and unconvincing. History is something that I’ve always been interested in, and I spend a lot of time reading about ancient Britian, so it just seemed the logical thing for me to write about. So we kept some of the riffs and stuff from the original songs, but I totally redid the lyrics with this new theme in mind, and it seemed to work a lot better. I think lyrics always come out better when the subject matter is something their author has an interest in or feels strongly about, and that certainly proved to be the case for us as the quality of our lyrics improved dramatically! I think with this kind of music the lyrics are extremely important, so I’m pleased to be able to stand behind my lyrics rather than have to perform some contrite, cliched black metal nonsense that I feel no connection to. But I suppose you and our other listeners will be the judge of whether or not that early change of direction worked!

N: At least you broke away from the cliché that a lot of black metal bands get trapped in. Throughout the time Wolfthorn has been around, have you or any of the other members been accused of ridiculous antics like “goat sacrifice” or “devil worship” based on the music? Or is it something you fear will happen when the band gets bigger?

G: Haha, not yet I’m afraid! We’ve had a few strange emails from nutjobs in America accusing us of being a racist band and ridiculous things like that, but that happens to a lot of bands that sing about heritage and history these days. It’s a shame that some people jump to conclusions like that, but you just have to ignore it really. As a band we have absolutely no political or religious agendas, and while our lyrics do refer to “British” heritage and identity, this is not intened to convey a sense of superiority over other people, racially or otherwise. We are proud of where we come from, and write songs about periods of history we are interested in, but that’s as far as it goes. Criticism like that is not something that’s ever really bothered me though, if anything I’m pleased that people in America have heard our music, even if they totally missed the point of it! There’s no such thing as bad publicity I guess. Haters gonna hate!

N: It’s good to see that there are bands that keep politics and religion out of the music. Speaking of other countries, are there any countries you’d like to tour in the future when the band has a larger, more international fan base?

G: It’s not something I’ve ever thought about to be honest. If that were ever to happen, I’ve never left Europe in my life so I suppose it’d be cool to visit places like the USA and Canada or Australia and New Zealand. It’d be really cool to play in places like Germany or Scandinavia where Heavy Metal music is still a mainstream force. But that’s all in the future if it ever happens at all, for now I’d quite like play the rest our own country! We’ve never played in the south of England, and we haven’t done Wales, Ireland or Scotland yet either, so we’ll probably try and tick those places off before we start leading the jetset lifestyle!

N: Just a few more questions now. In terms of your writing, aside from history, what influences you the most?

G: A variety of things really. History, along with mythology and folk legends, as you mentioned, is definitely the main influence lyrically. There are a few exceptions, however. Twilight in Valinor, from our EP, is about JRR Tolkien’s epic The Silmarillion. I’m quite proud of the lyrics in that one as I managed to rhyme two Elvish words! Aside from that, there are a few songs on the new album inspired by nature and the countryside, as well as one track that touches on some more personal themes. Musically, I have a wide array of influences. When the band formed the main influence was definitely Dissection, and they continue to be a big inspiration, although I always wanted to incorporate things like guitar solos and twin lead sections from the more traditional Heavy Metal that makes up the majority of my record collection. Whilst writing the second release, I was listening to a lot of Swedish death metal, particularly the record Silence of the World Beyond by A Canorous Quintet, so expect to hear that influence come through more strongly when you hear the album! Most people describe Wolfthorn as black metal with NWOBHM influences, which I suppose makes sense as that is essentially the sound I’m trying to create with my songwriting.

N: They’re certainly some impressive influences. Once again, thank you for your time. Final question now… Aside from the next album release and the Birmingham gig, what else is the band planning for the rest of the year? Any underground festivals or gigs elsewhere in the UK?

G: We’re playing a show in Lancaster on October 28th, which we’re quite looking forward to as it will be our first hometown show since November of the previous year. I would imagine that there will be some kind of release party whenever the album comes out too, which would also be in Lancaster as well. Other than that, there’s nothing else planned, but we’re always open to offers, so if anyone reading this likes our stuff and wants to book us to play their town, don’t hesitate to get in touch! Cheers for talking to me anyway mate, it’s been fun. Best of luck with your website, and hopefully I’ll see you at a Wolfthorn show in the future and we can have a pint together!

Celtachor – In The Halls Of Our Ancient Fathers [2010]

Posted in CD, Metal with tags , , , , , , on 21st June 2011 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Band: Celtachor
Album: In The Halls Of Our Ancient Fathers
Release year: 2010
Genre: Celtic Black Metal

Celtachor formed in the early, wintery months of 2007, combining a mixture of folk, doom and black metal. They have slowly been on the rise in the Irish underground metal scene with their uniquely told version of Irish mythology and other great legends and stories of Ireland. “In The Hall Of Our Ancient Fathers” is the recent addition to their on going saga.

The tribal-like sounds of “Nemed’s Wake” eerily makes itself heard with dark, droning choir-like vocals creating a grim and terrifying atmosphere. A symphonic piece of epic proportions shortly follows, making way for the next track “Rise of Lugh”. The first riff is lacking in speed but has a clear black metal sound. The tempo increases with the vocals and drums entering the fray. There are clear Celtic influences in some of the flute medleys, adding a very legendary mystique to the music. The vocals are raw, untamed and savagely good. Some of the riffs are very crushing and brutal.

”In The Halls Of Nuada” comes next, beginning with a Celtic medley before the demonic onslaught of guitars, vocals and drums. The guitars and drums seem to be lacking in power compared to the vocals, which dominate the track viciously. In certain sections, the riffs are very choppy and whilst the drums seem more barbaric. “A Warning To Balor” blasts its way next with more of an eighties styled rock section which oddly works well with the more aggressive screams. There are a few melodic licks on this track as well. A masterfully played bass riff introduces the next track “Riders Of The Fomor”. The guitar riff that follows is mediocre and weak sounding. The Celtic styled medleys make a return on this track, adding a beautiful sound to the aggressive riffs. The vocals sound more raw and bloodthirsty.

“The Sons of Tuireann and the Blood Fine” is the second to last track, which calmly starts with an enchanting flute medley. The guitars join in soon after, twinning well with the flute. The vocals are still going strong, raw and murderous sounding, fortunately. The drums are sounding more powerful and beastly on this track as well. The final track “The Wavesweeper” begins with an intro similar to the first track, though the riff that follows seems poorly composed. The track improves with the introduction of the vocals, however, bringing a brutal assault of black metal. It is certainly one of the more violent tracks and perhaps the best one.

Celtachor are slowly becoming masters of their trade. “In The Halls Of Our Ancient Ancestors” is a brilliant mixture of Irish sagas, black metal and Celtic influences. If the ancient tribes of Ireland listened to metal, then this would certainly be that they’d approve of.

5/5

Nico Davidson

Episode 13 – Death Reclaims The Earth [2010]

Posted in CD, Metal with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on 20th June 2011 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Band: Episode 13
Album: Death Reclaims The Earth
Release year: 2010
Genre: Black Metal

Turkey is a country known for its rich history and culture but less known for its metal scene. In 2001, Episode 13 formed, slowly building both a fan base and a name for the Turkish metal with their black metal stylings. “Death Reclaims The Earth” is their latest release.

”Ars Moriendi”, Latin for “The Art Of Dying”, begins with a dirge like guitar riff, which suits the track well considering its name. The vocals aren’t as rough or vicious as expected to begin with, though when the tempo increases the vocals become far more aggressive, fortunately. The drums are heavy, like they should be on any black metal track. the tempo switches between fast and slow, which is slightly irritating to begin with though one soon gets used to it. “Physical Comatose & Mental Overdose” starts with a slightly faster guitar section, whilst the drums are slow but precise to the beat. The vocals come in with a good start, full of aggression and angst. The blast beats are immense, bringing heaviness to the track.

The third track, “Unmensch”, which is German for either “brute” or “monster”, comes next, turning up the aggression, brutality and heaviness by a few notches. Everything sounds more violent and savage on this track, which is always a good thing. “Ignorance Is Bliss” turns things down a notch whilst staying murderous sounding. The drums sound disappointing at first though they gradually improve. The vocals, on the other hand, sound more grim and bloodthirsty. “Ultimate Sterilization” brings things back up a notch with a brilliant opening section that assaults the ear drums like a blitz over London. The riffs have a very old skool black metal sound to them, similar to a mixture of Venom and Gorgoroth. The drums are savagely intelligent whilst the bass work is immense and somewhat different in some sections.

Nearing the end of the album is the second track “Worthless”. It is lighter compared to the previous track though still heavy enough to considered metal. The tempo has slowed down as well which is a nice touch. The vocals, on this track, could be compared to the dying groans of a cow being mutilated – Which is pretty damned kvlt. A faster tempo does occur on this track, though it still stays light. The final track is “Spread His Word”. The introduction sounds like a stampede of a demonic legion due to the sheer brutality of it. The vocals sound more powerful, more aggressive and more violent while the riffs are like the hellish anthems of the underworld. This track is virtually unrelenting in its brutality, aggression and musical genius.

Episode 13 have proved themselves to be one of the best bands rising in the black metal scene. With a raw, untamed sound combined with unrestricted brutality, “Death Reclaims The Earth” is a gemstone of an album, worth every penny. Episode 13 are a band to keep an ear out for as we’ll certainly be hearing more great things from these guys!

4/5

Nico Davidson

66crusher – Blackest Day [2011]

Posted in CD, Metal with tags , , , , , , , , , , on 20th June 2011 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Band: 66crusher
Album: Blackest Day
Release year: 2011
Genre: Progressive Thrash Metal

66crusher have been on the rise since the release of their debut album “in 2005. Since then they have been fighting their way to the top of the worldwide metal scene, gaining new fans each year. “Blackest Day” is the next step in their journey.

The title track, “Blackest Day”, is the first track of the album. It begins with a very thrash-influenced guitar riff whilst the drums are more laid back in comparison. The vocals are classic metal in their sound, standing out from the music – In an epic way. The vocals work well with the soft riff about half way through the track, giving the track a slight progressive edge. The track ends in true thrash metal style. “Recreated Destiny” has a slower, more emotional sounding introduction. Both the guitar riff and vocals are soft yet majestic, whilst touching a very deep emotional level not usually found in thrash metal. The track’s pace increases with the appearance of the drums, which again are quite laid back compared to the guitars. The vocals sound more powerful later on during in the track.

Following after is “Unsaid”. The intro is slow, heavy and dominating. The vocals, again, are soft to begin with, as is the piano medley that joins them. The drums slightly overpower the piano, which is somewhat disappointing. The track switches between light and heavy – Which is a nice emotional effect for the song. Next is “Concept of Elimination”, beginning with a choppy guitar section, which soon replaced by a more consistent, melodic guitar riff and an acute drum pattern. The vocals are strong, with a hint of a Judas Priest-sound. There is a good blend of progressive-sounding softer sections and heavier, savage thrash-styled riffs throughout the track, which makes up for it being almost ten minutes long.

”Recreated Reality” blasts next with an immense riff of violent proportions. The drums are barbaric yet precise to the beat. The vocals are still going strong, keeping the track interesting. Some of the riffs leave much to be desired though it is mostly a decent track. “Borderline” is another track that begins with a choppy riff, which can be off-putting for new listeners and just seems to drone on for the first few minutes. Another issue with the track is the length of it – Just over twelve minutes – Which again, can be off-putting for new listeners. The other riffs are well composed and sound great, as do the vocals and drums.

Nearing the end of the album comes “Shipwrecked”. Like some of the other tracks, the intro riff is soft and melodic, though it is short lived. The heavier riff certainly brings more excellence to the track though the drums are lacking in comparison. The vocals seem deeper yet more defined. They seem suitably combined with the acoustic riff. One thing that stands out the most about this track is the emphasis on the acoustic riffs, though the heavier riffs do play an important part of the track. “Shipwrecked” is certainly the best track of the album.

”Diminished Mind” starts with a mediocre sounding riff, which is a let down compared to the previous track. The vocals seem weaker as well and the drums also are lacking in power. The track does improve later on however, with some very Megadeth-styled riffs. “Us Beneath The Sea” is the final track of the album. Like some of the previous tracks, its intro is a soft riff, as are the vocals and drums. The riffs later become more wild west-sounding for a short while but they stay soft for the majority track, making for a good chill out track after eight brutalising tracks. The guitar solo towards the end does make the track slightly heavier though not by much.

”Blackest Days” features a strange yet wonderful mixture of progressive metal and thrash metal combined with some old skool sounds. 66crusher have certainly out-done themselves with this album, though there are some sections that could have done with more work.

4.5/5

Nico Davidson

Sulphur – Thorns In Existence [2010]

Posted in CD, Metal with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 19th June 2011 by Nico Solheim-Davidson

Band: Sulphur
Album: Thorns in Existence
Release year: 2011
Genre: Blackened Death Metal

Sulphur, who formed from the ashes of nineties black metal band “Taakeriket” and are made up of ex-members of Gorgoroth, Aeternus and Enslaved, have been a fierce, dominating force to be reckoned with in the Norwegian metal scene. Following a few years of laying dormant, Sulphur are back and fiercer than ever with “Thorns In Existence”.

”Revelations” begins with an eerie yet cheesy keyboard introduction, the kind that would be heard in a low-budget horror film. The guitars and drums, while greatly composed, are lighter and more melodic than expected. “True Father Of Lies” follows after, continuing from where “Revelations” finished. The guitars are less melodic and focus more on violent riffs, whilst the drums favour an aggressive approach as well. The vocals are ruthless and unrelenting, keeping the track beastly and heavy. A huge improvement from the first track “Revelations”, though the keyboard section on this track has a hint of cheesiness.

“The Purifying Flame” begins with a very creepy set of sound effects which are soon replaced by ferocious guitar riff and a brutalising drum pattern. The vocals, again are ruthless sounding, unrelenting in their aggression throughout most of the track. The strained whisper-like vocals combined with the slow guitar riff bring a new dynamic to the track. The guitar solo is most impressive, blending well with the stream of double bass pedal. The next track, “Hunting Sickening Seas” starts with a slow, brutalising and shockingly good intro. The vocals have more of a death element which mixes in well with the slow intro. There is a use of clean vocals on the track which gives it more a creepy sound. The acoustic section about half way through the track is a surprise yet a welcome break in between the storm of guitars, vocals and drums.

“Luna Noctiluca” follows after with a slow-paced, brutal and melodic guitar and drums section. The tempo increases with the introduction of the vocals. There is a contrast of clean vocals and screams, which works well with the music. The guitar solo is certainly a highlight of the track and perhaps one of the most enjoyable things about the album. “Into Nothingness” fades its way next. Even after the faded intro, the track seems weak and soft. In some sections, the vocals sound odd and the drums are semi-audible. in the same way it began, it fades out, making way for “Inverted Visions of Eternal Salvation”. It begins with a half-muted intro which soon turns beasty and aggressive. The drum work is intelligent, whilst the guitars are masterfully played and composed. The vocals are still going strong, working well with the synth sections. The track ends on a very creepy note.

“Ravner Beiter I Banesår”, which roughly translated means “Ravens pastures in his death-wounds”, blasts its way next, turning up the level of violence and brutality. The vocals are more slow-paced compared to the guitars and drums, though just as beastly and savage. There are some melodic riff use in one or two sections of the track, which is a pleaser for those who prefer melody over brutality. The track ends with a dramatic symphonic section. “Throne of Illusion” is the second to last track, beginning with a ghastly synth riff, similar to one found in a previous track. The guitars and drums that follow are nothing short of violent, savage and barbaric. The vocals have the bloodthirsty sound to them, as is to be expected. The breakdown towards the end is extremely unexpected however brings a whole new level to both the track and the album.

“A Crimson Line” is the final track of the album. The introductory riff is similar to one found on a Lamb of God album, only with more bite. The brutality and melody contrasts and blends brilliantly and the vocals are still going stronger, perhaps stronger than what they have been for the rest of the album. The use of keyboards and drums only on part of the track is just pure genius. “A Crimson Line” is certainly one of the best tracks on the album.

It’s easy to see why Sulphur have been a dominating force in the Norwegian metal scene. “Thorns In Existence” combines the best of black metal and death metal and mixed in a vast amount of musical genius and talent. This is certainly one of the best albums to come out of Norway since the early days of the Norwegian black metal scene.

5/5

Nico Davidson