Archive for Cradle Of Filth

Cradle Of Filth to co-headline the Metal Stage of Alt-Fest 2014 on August 17th

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , , on 3rd November 2013 by Pieni

 photo cof_zps2faa4fb2.jpg

Alt-Fest, “the first fully crowd funded and crowd led outdoor festival” (read more here), has announced Cradle Of Filth as the first co-headliner of the Metal Stage on its last day, Sunday, 17th August 2014. After Metal Hammer claiming that the band’s latest album “The Manticore and Other Horrors” is their best in years, this headlining show will confirm CoF’s status as one of the best British extreme metal acts.

Also Malefice, Palm Reader and Onslaught have been added to this bill, the first two on Sunday as well, the latter on Friday.

Fearless Vampire Killers will headline the S.O.P.H.I.E. stage on Saturday, while Truckfighters and Steak will be playing the Main stage.

Super Early-Bird Tickets, meaning 3 day festival full festival access to all stages and attractions, are already on sale at the festival’s official webpage for £70. Check it out also for additional information on the line-up, camping and travel.

http://www.alt-fest.com/2014/
https://www.facebook.com/AlternativeFest

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Behemoth announce co-headlining tour with Cradle of Filth

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , on 25th October 2013 by Nico Davidson

February 2014 will see, Polish metal overlords Behemoth and British extreme gothic act Cradle of Filth, two of the most iconic extreme metal acts of the modern era, unite on a co-headlining tour around Europe. The European crusade will take the two bands to London at the HMV Forum on 10th February for an exclusive UK show. The tour itself will take the two metallic titans through Belgium, Germany, Sweden, Denmark, France and Luxembourg and a few other locations.

In related news, Behemoth‘s next release The Satanist is scheduled for release via Buclear Blast in early 2014. Frontman Nergal comments:

We are immensely proud to start promotion of The Satanist on the release date of the album in such a noble company. It’s been a while since we toured Europe for the last time… The wolfpack grew stronger and hungrier and with new opus and stage production we have so much more to offer. This European crusade will be the catalyst of 2 years long tour so keep your eyes open!

This reign of darkness will be opened by Oslo based Svarttjern and the rest of the line up is completed by, Swedish heavy metal veterans In Solitude and Colombian black metallers Inquistion.

Behemoth online:

http://behemoth.pl

http://facebook.com/behemoth

Amon Amarth release final segment of mini-doctumentary: Forging Mjölnir

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , on 11th June 2013 by Nico Davidson

The final segment of Amon Amarth’s Forging Mjölnir mini documentary premiered today! The intimate three-part account comes in celebration of their forthcoming new studio offering, Deceiver of the Gods, set for worldwide release later this month. Directed by Luke Daley, the striking black and white film offers candid commentary with each member on a host of subjects.

Watch the concluding clip where the Amon Amarth collective discuss the struggles of tour life, recording and their hopes for the future via their microsite at this location.

Having blasted onto the Swedish melodic death metal scene with 1998’s Once Sent from the Golden Hall, every Amon Amarth album has arrived bursting at the seams with power, melody and immersive storytelling centred around the richness of Norse mythology. Deceiver of the Gods captures the quintet at the peak of their powers.

Their ninth epic was recorded at Backstage Studios in Derbyshire, UK and produced, mixed and mastered by Andy Sneap, a man whose résumé includes seminal albums from the likes of Cathedral, Arch Enemy, and Cradle Of Filth. Vocalist Johan Hegg explains:

We wanted more of a live feeling to the recording and we felt that Andy’s style of producing could definitely help us with that. At the same time, knowing the records he worked on previously we felt he could probably help develop our sound so it became a little bit more angry and dangerous, without that polished sheen of our recent records.

Guitarist Olavi Mikkonen concurs, and credits Sneap with playing a pivotal role in just how aggressive the finished product is. Olavi comments:

It’s rougher, and like a punch in the face, which is what we wanted it to be. Though adding more thrash elements into a few of the songs helps the whole album sound more hostile, it’s ultimately the production that makes them sound more aggressive. On the last few records it didn’t matter how aggressive the riffs we wrote were, whenever we went into the studio at the end they just didn’t sound as intense.

In tracking the record at Sneap’s UK studio, as much as possible the band recorded long takes rather than clinically piecing things together, determined to give the album as much life as they could. Vocalist Johan continues:

Fredrik [Andersson] recorded all the drums live, with the guys playing guitars and bass along with him to get the groove of it, and that makes for the energy that you don’t get when everyone records separately, and I think that really comes across. I think that was a very good way to record for us, it gave everyone a better feel of each song, and it was a good time being in the studio and laying it all down.

Deceiver of the Gods boasts another exceptional Tom Thiel-created cover depicting a mythical battle between the Norse figures Loki and Thor. As an added bonus, Messiah Marcolin (Candlemass) makes an appearance as guest vocalist on eighth track, Hel.

For special Deceiver of the Gods pre-order packages as well as a stream of the title track, go to this location. Additionally, you can still check out Shape Shifter currently streaming via Stereogum HERE.

Deceiver of the Gods will be released in North America via Metal Blade Records 25th June, in Europe 21st/24th June and Japan on June 26th.

Following a run of European festival dates already underway, Amon Amarth will be opening the main stage of this year’s edition of the Rockstar Energy Drink Mayhem Fest set to commence June 29 in San Bernardino.

Amon Amarth online:

http://www.amonamarth.com
http://www.facebook.com/OfficialAmonAmarth
http://twitter.com/amonamarthband
http://deceiver.amonamarth.com

 

Paradise Lost celebrate 25th anniversary with special guests Lacuna Coil

Posted in Featured, News with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on 21st May 2013 by Nico Davidson

Thirteen albums into Paradise Lost‘s 25 year career, namedropping is pointless. The only band they can and should be held up against for comparison and consideration is… Well… Paradise Lost.

With a career dating back to 1988, and their official recording debut in 1990 (Lost Paradise), the band has been riding and rollercoaster of highs and lows. Guitarist Aaron Aedy remembers the early days:

I remember our first rehearsal at Studio X in the Dean Clough complex of Halifax, it was Saturday March 26th between the hours of one and four pm. We had a few ideas flying around and managed to write our first opus ‘Blood-filled-eyes’ and start our 2nd ‘Plains of Desolation’, I can only describe these songs as unique.

Afterwards we all went to the pub after to celebrate. Three and a half months later we were playing live, supporting Acid Reign and Re-Animator at the legendary Frog and Toad Night Club in Bradford. We had a 30 minute slot and only 15 minutes of music so we played one song twice, attempted a Sodom cover we hadn’t even learned and Nick [Holmes, vocals] did his stand up for the rest of it.

Throughout their career, Paradise Lost have not only created and defined genres and styles, but almost immediately transcended them. From the crawling, harrowing doom of their 1990 debut Lost Paradise, to the electronic flourishes prevalent in 1997′s One Second, 1999′s Host and 2007′s comeback to the heavier side of metal In Requiem and the latest opus Tragic Idol in 2012, their sound has continued to evolve vastly, but haunting melody and dark rock power has remained at the very core of their identity.

In 1991 the band released Gothic, not so much an album title as the definition for an entire genre, while the influence 1995′s huge-selling masterpiece Draconian Times – the missing link between Metallica and the Sisters of Mercy – echoes loudly in today’s scene, with the likes of Cradle of Filth, Nightwish and HIM owing a huge debt to their knack for injecting heavy rock with their trademark dark sheen.

Now it’s time to celebrate 25 years of glamour and gloom with four anniversary shows in October to which the band have invited their friends Lacuna Coil. Another, very special guest, will be announced shortly for those dates.

Paradise Lost anniversary shows:

Oct 30th – Wolverhampton – Wulfrun Hall (www.wolvescivic.co.uk)
Oct 31st – Glasgow – ABC (www.ticketweb.co.uk)
Nov 1st – Manchester – Ritz (www.kililive.com)
Nov 3rd – London – Roundhouse (www.kililive.com)

Tickets go on pre-sale Wednesday 22nd May and general sale Friday 24th May and a special VIP package is available to buy (limited to 25 per venue) which includes:

  • An exclusive deluxe box containing 2 engraved beer glasses featuring all the bands album titles and crown of thorns logo.
  • Exclusive VIP Only T-Shirt with artwork from the forthcoming Tragic Illusion album.
  • A 180 gram vinyl copy of the reissued landmark Gothic, personally signed by all the band members.
  • Crown of Thorns Tote Bag
  • VIP lanyard and laminate allowing you access to the show
  • Early access to the show
  • Meet and greet with the band
  • Photo opportunity with the band (please bring your own camera)

Nick had this to say about the forthcoming anniversary shows:

25 years IS a long time, on the surface we may look ramshackled, but playing music for so many years has kept us young in our hearts and I truly believe that a youthful spirit is one of the greatest things you can’t buy in a pub.

We have written many albums, played many concerts; we are older and not really any wiser, but there is a strong possibility we may play a song you thought we never would. So please come along and join the celebrations with us, including our biggest UK headline show to date!

Lacuna Coil’s frontwoman Cristina adds:

Paradise Lost were in between the bands that strongly influenced me as a singer, when I started my career with Lacuna Coil, so it is just awesome for me to realise we’ll share the stage with them on this upcoming tour.

I am sure that the dark vibe coming from the stage will totally embrace old school and new fans making it an event you absolutely CAN’T miss! Boy, I can’t wait!

Stay tuned for more exciting anniversary announcements including a special audio surprise for fans!

Paradise Lost online:

http://www.paradiselost.co.uk
http://facebook.com/paradiselostofficial

Lacuna Coil online:

http://www.lacunacoil.it
http://www.twitter.com/lacuna_coil
http://www.myspace.com/lacunacoil
http://www.youtube.com/lacunacoil
http://www.facebook.com/lacunacoil

Cradle of Filth frontman joins Devilment

Posted in Featured, News with tags , , , , , , on 13th March 2013 by Nico Davidson

Dani Filth, the infamous frontman for the UK’s extreme gothic act Cradle of Filth, has joined British band Devilment. Originally formed in 2011 by Daniel J Finch, in what is described as a “bout of religious delirium”, the band’s line-up consisted of Simon Dawson on drums (Steve Harris, ex-Dearly Beheaded), Justin Walker (13 Candles) handling bass duties and Kieron De-Courci (ex-The Voice) on keyboards with the band experiencing a number of problems holding down a permanent vocalist.

Dani Filth originally entered and agreed to help out on a couple tracks which then turned into a studio demo. With the departure of Dawson, Walker and De-Courci, Devilment collected Nick Johnson on bass, Dan Jackson on guitar alongside Aaron Boast on drums.

Gorod confirmed for Southeast Asia’s biggest metal festival

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , on 4th February 2013 by Nico Davidson

French jazz-death metal act Gorod have been announced for the Hammersonic Jakarta international Metal Festival, which is billed as the Biggest Metal Festival in Southeast Asia, on April 27th and 28th.

The band are absolutely excited to be part of one of Asia’s biggest metal festival alongside bands like Cradle Of Filth, Cannibal Corpse, As I Lay Dying, Lock Up, Epica, Dying Fetus, Hour of Penance, and more. This will also be the first time ever that the band will play Asia.

Gorod will also play the Bonecrusher Fest European tour, in March, with Job For a Cowboy, Beneath the Massacre, War From a Harlot Mouth, As They Burn and Make Them Suffer.

http://www.facebook.com/BonecrusherFest

01.03.13 Germany Köln @ Underground
02.03.13 Holland Drachten @ Iduna
03.03.13 UK Nottingham @ Rescue Rooms
04.03.13 UK Glasgow @ Cathouse
05.03.13 UK Leeds @ Uni Mine
06.03.13 UK London @ Underworld
07.03.13 Belgium Antwerpen @ Trix
08.03.13 France Savigny le Temple @ Empreinte
09.03.13 France Montauban @ Rio
10.03.13 Spain Madrid @ Sala Caracol
11.03.13 Spain Badalona @ Sala Estraperlo
13.03.13 Luxembourg Esch-Alzette @ Kulturfabrik
14.03.13 Switzerland Yverdon-les-Bains @ L’Amalgame
15.03.13 Switzerland Aarau @ Kiff
16.03.13 Germany München @ Backstage
17.03.13 Austria Graz @ Explosiv
18.03.13 Germany Würzburg @ Posthalle
19.03.13 Germany Berlin @ Lido
20.03.13 Poland Warsaw @ Progresja
21.03.13 Czech Rep Brno @ Melodka
22.03.13 Germany Chemnitz @ Talschock
23.03.13 Germany Rostock @ Alte Zuckerfabrik
25.03.13 Finland Helsinki @ Nosturi
27.03.13 Sweden Stockholm @ Göta Källare
28.03.13 Sweden Gothenburg @ Brewhouse
29.03.13 Denmark Copenhagen @ Pumpehuset
30.03.13 Germany Bochum @ Matrix

 

Old Corpse Road – ‘Tis Witching Hour… As Spectres we Haunt this Kingdom

Posted in CD, Metal with tags , , , , , , on 5th December 2012 by Nico Davidson

Old Corpse Road
‘Tis Witching Hour… As Spectres we Haunt this Kingdom
Released in November 2012
Black/Folk/Atmospheric Metal
Released via Godreah Records

Old Corpse Road are one of those bands that have carved themselves a dark and haunting career since their formation whilst avoiding too much exposure. Keeping true to the mythology of Great Britain, OCR are known in the underground scene for breathing a new and somewhat twisted life into British folklore and mythology. ‘Tis Witching Hour… As Spectres We Haunt This Kingdom is but the newest chapter in the band’s mystifying and haunting career.

Upon the first listen, the album takes you gently by the hand and takes you down a long and winding path that greets you with dark yet grand orchestration that is emphasised by the poetic narration as portrayed in the opening track: ‘Tis Witching Hour whilst other parts of the album come screaming out like the hellish hounds of one’s own nightmares – Of course, this isn’t a bad thing, if anything, it’s the opposite. The Cauld Lad of Hylton is one of the must-listen tracks of the album; sending forth a screaming barrage of hungry riffs with a more gentle, elegant orchestration, the track embodies all that is Old Corpse Road.

The brooding use of keyboards echo lyrically throughout the album, especially in the aforementioned The Cauld Lad of Hylton, Hag of the Mist and Isobel – Queen of Scottish Witches – The latter of which quite literally oozes with a certain magic quality that floats ever soothingly across the vast ocean of riffs and vocals yet whisked almost violently by the drums. A fair few of the tracks scream out with an essence of Cradle of Filth, from the Dusk… And Her Embrace era but building upon that sound and creating it into some sort of atmospheric enchantment that never fails to mesmerise and entrance the listener.

The Wild Voice Came is an unexpected interlude during the album but still as beautiful as the other tracks whilst I find the final track As Spectres we Haunt this Kingdom to be the highlight of the album and my new personal favourite Old Corpse Road song. Bringing a chilling atmosphere, the song is an enthralling piece of music that is the perfect way for the album to come to its sirenic finale.

Old Corpse Road are to metal, what Edgar Allen Poe is to literature – Composers and conjurers to truly dark and ethereal creations. ‘Tis Witching Hour… As Spectres We Haunt This Kingdom is no doubt an ominous classic that will echo throughout the ever darkening ages, like the timeless myths of days gone by.

5/5

Nico Davidson

 

Cradle of Filth w/Support @ Klubi, Tampere (Finland)

Posted in Gig, Live, Metal with tags , , , , , , on 16th November 2012 by izaforestspirit

Dark End, Rotting Christ, God Seed, Cradle Of Filth
Klubi, Tampere, Finland
15th November 2012

Klubi is a medium sized gig venue located in the heart of the Tampere city. Last night it was packed full of goths and metalheads who had all come to witness the nightmare that is the Finland leg of Cradle of Filth’s ‘Creatures From The Black Abyss’ tour.

Dark End
This Italian symphonic black metal band really likes their stage props. Their performance featured amongst other things: a blood stained cloth, burning incense and some twig-like gloves for the singer. They were also planning to use some live pyrotechnics but the venue owner didn’t give them permission to do so. Sadly, in spite of all the props, their show lacked in energy and most of the songs were slow and not particularly memorable.

Rotting Christ
These guys proved that you don’t need any corpse-paint or fancy stage props to put on a great show. Rotting Christ’s energetic, no-frills approach to black/melodic death metal won them several new fans as they entertained the crowds with a set packed full of fast metal tunes. I’m not familiar with their work but after that performance I’m tempted to check out some of their stuff.


God Seed

I’ve actually seen this band live before, albeit very briefly at Hellfest a few years ago. The only things I remember about them was that they play black metal and feature two former members from Gorgoroth. Anyway, this time their show was a case of hit and miss. Some of the black metal tracks they played were good but then they had these slow ambient style songs featuring some weird, pop-esque keyboard which didn’t fit the music at all.

Cradle Of Filth
This was my third Cradle Of Filth gig and once again they did not disappoint. Their set was packed full of hit songs which have left their mark in the band’s long history including: ‘Summer Dying Fast’ (one of my personal favorites), ‘Funeral In Carpathia’, ‘Cruelty Brought Thee Orchids’, ‘Nymphetamine’, ‘Lilith Immaculate’ and two tracks from the new album. Interestingly enough they did not play ‘Her Ghost In The Fog’ or any other track from the ‘Midian’ album but instead they ended their set with a performance ‘From The Cradle to Enslave’. Another thing that had changed since the last time when I saw them live was that the female backing vocals were sung by the keyboard player at times, and from play-back on certain songs. This made some of the older Cradle of Filth tracks sound a bit different to the way they do on the albums. Nonetheless I’m really glad that they chose to play the older stuff and I hope to see them live again in the future.

 

Darkend confirmed for Satan’s Convention 2012 & Cradle of Filth tour

Posted in Metal, Misc., News with tags , , on 5th October 2012 by izaforestspirit

Italian orchestral blacksters DARKEND have just been
confirmed for Satans Convention 2012 with Naglfar, Taake,
Angantyr, Inquisition and many others. The festival will
take place in Halle 101, Speyer – Germany, on December 29.

Meanwhile, DARKEND are to set sail for a European tour
alongside Cradle Of Filth, God Seed and Rotting Christ in
support of their latest album ‘Grand Guignol – Book I’
released earlier this year under the blessing of the Arcane
Witchcraft Coven.

Tour dates and venues are listed below.
07 NOV – (NL) Haarlem, Patronaat
08 NOV – (NL) Leeuwarden, Romein
09 NOV – (DE) Osnabruck, Hyde Park
10 NOV – (DK) Aarhus, Train
12 NOV – (SE) Gothenburg, Tradgarn
13 NOV – (SE) Stockholm, Klubben
15 NOV – (FI) Tampere, Klubi
16 NOV – (FI) Helsinki, Nosturi
17 NOV – TBA
19 NOV – TBA
20 NOV – (UA) Kiev, Bingo
22 NOV – (PL) Warsaw, Progressja
23 NOV – (PL) Kracow, Kwadrat
24 NOV – (CZ) Zlin, Winter Masters Of Rock
26 NOV – (IT) Bologna, Estragon
27 NOV – (IT) Milan, Magazzini Generali

For more information on DARKEND visit
http://www.darkend.it

Valk-Fest venue change plus final line-up details

Posted in News with tags , , , , , on 4th October 2012 by Nico Davidson

Shades Nightclub in Bridlington will be the host for this year’s Valkyrian Festival, following the closure of The Lamp in Hull earlier this year. The annual event, organised by Bridlington-based webzine Valkyrian Music, is in aid of UK charity Autism Plus.

Valkyrian Festival will take place on Friday 23rd and Saturday 24th November, with doors on the Friday night opening at 6pm and at 2:30 pm on the Saturday. Bridlington’s own deathcore titans in the making Sea Of Giants will headline the Friday night, with support from Riff-X, Illflower, Dead Pools and Gloomlurker, whom supported ex-Cradle of Filth backing vocalist Sarah Jezebel Deva, earlier this year in Grimsby.

Saturday will be headlined by Birmingham prop-power metallers Dakesis, who supported Edguy earlier this year and played an exclusive acoustic set at Bloodstock back in August. Joining them, as main support will be Ziyos and fresh from Bloodstock’s New Blood Stage, will be Hull’s premier misanthropic black metal outfit Infernal Creation, who blasted their way through Bloodstock this year on the New Blood Stage, along with special guests Sanguine,whom rocked Download back in June. North-west metal bands Nitronein and Shades of Avalon will also be joining Dakesis as supports, along with female fronted operatic metal outfit Aonia who will be playing a rare and exclusive acoustic set. Engraved in Blood and Organized K-Hos will be completing the line-up for Saturday, as well Apparition, who will be playing with their new frontwoman, following the break after their tour with ex-CoF backing vocalist Sarah Jezebel Deva.

Weekend tickets are priced at the low, low, low price of £4 and are available here. Day tickets will be available on the door. All proceeds will go to Autism Plus (Register charity no. 518591). The event is all ages, with alcohol available from the pub above the venue.

Poster designed by Dark Creative 32.

God Seed to tour Europe in November & December

Posted in News with tags , , , , , on 21st September 2012 by Nico Davidson

God Seed are heading out to tour Europe in November and December with Cradle of Filth on the Creatures From The Black Abyss Tour 2012! You don’t want to miss this! Check out the dates below.

God Seed release the new album I Begin October 22nd in North America, October 26th in Norway & GAS and October 30th in the rest of Europe.

Creatures From The Black Abyss – European Tour 2012:

07 Nov – Holland, Haarlem – Patronaat
08 Nov – Holland, Leeuwarden – Romeein
09 Nov – Germany, Osnabrück – Hyde Park
10 Nov – Denmark, Aarhus – Train
12 Nov – Sweden, Gothenburg – Trädgarn
13 Nov – Sweden, Stockholm – Klubben
15 Nov – Finland, Tampere – Klubbi
16 Nov – Finland, Helsinki – Nosturi
17 Nov – Estonia, Tallinn – Rock Cafe
19 Nov – Belarus, Minsk – Re:Public
20 Nov – Ukraine, Kiev – Bingo
22 Nov – Poland, Warsaw – Progressja
23 Nov – Poland, Krakow – Kwadrat
24 Nov – Czech Republic, Zlin – Winter Masters Of Rock
26 Nov – Italy, Bologna – Estragon
27 Nov – Italy, Milan – Alcatraz (Small Hall)
29 Nov – France, Montpellier – Rockstore
30 Nov – Spain, Bilbao – Santana 27
01 Dec – Spain, Santiago De Compostela – Capitol
02 Dec – Portugal, Porto – Hard Club
04 Dec – Spain, Madrid – La Riviera
05 Dec – Spain, Barcelona – Salamandra
07 Dec – Germany, Geiselwind – Musichall
08 Dec – Germany, Bochum – Matrix
09 Dec – Switzerland, Pratteln – Z-7
11 Dec – Czech Republic, Prague – Meet Factory
13 Dec – Slovakia, Bratislava – Majestic Music Club
14 Dec – Germany, Munich – Theaterfabrik
15 Dec – Austria, Wels – Schlachthof
16 Dec – Germany, Berlin – C-Club
19 Dec – UK, London – Forum

The Manticore and Other Horrors tracklisting unveiled

Posted in News with tags , , , , , on 12th September 2012 by Nico Davidson

Cradle of Filth have revealed the track list for the band’s upcoming 10th studio album, The Manticore and Other Horrors, due out October 29th (Europe) via Peaceville Records and October 30th (North America) via Nuclear Blast Records.

1. The Unveiling of O
2. The Abhorrent
3. For Your Vulgar Delectation
4. Illicitus
5. Manticore
6. Frost On Her Pillow
7. Huge Onyx Wings Behind Despair
8. Pallid Reflection
9. Siding With The Titans
10. Succumb To This
11. Nightmares Of An Ether Drinker
12. Death, The Great Adventure *Deluxe Edition Digipak
13. Sinfonia *Deluxe Edition Digipak

Recorded in eight weeks at both Springvale and Grindstone studios (where it was also mixed by Scott Atkins), Suffolk, the album is a testament to the longevity of The ‘Filth, as not only does it reek of Cradle’s (feared or revered) brand of delicious metal vamperotica, but this thoroughly modern album places the band firmly in fresh killing fields anew.

The Manticore and Other Horrors itself possesses an altogether new atmosphere for the band, incorporating a heavier, faster NWOBBM punk vibe that is both current and cruel, blended with ornate orchestration and the quirky immediateness of 2000′s Midian opus.

The album’s title can be likened to a bestiary, a collection of stories on monsters -  personal demons, Chimeras, literary fiends and world-enslaving entities to blame but a few.

Artwork for the impending release comes courtesy of Matthew Vickerstaff of Darkwaveart.

Commented the band’s infamous front man, Dani Filth, “This is our 10th commandment in metal. We have diversified and kept alive the spirit of this band and breathed it into something that I can proudly say, slays like an absolute motherf**ker. The Manticore is coming… Long live the filth!

Interview: Liv Kristine

Posted in Interview with tags , , , , , , on 10th September 2012 by Nico Davidson

Liv Kristine is one of the most prominent songwriters and performing artists in both the Norwegian music scene, as well as the international music scene. Beginning her musical career with Theatre of Tragedy, where she pioneered the use of beauty and beast vocals, Liv soon moved onto bigger things when she formed Leaves’ Eyes with the five musicians from Atrocity, including her husband Alexander Krull. Aside from her work with Leaves’ Eyes, Liv is well known for her solo project, with her fourth solo album being released today. Luckily, Nico was able to have a chat with Liv regarding her solo career, her inspirations, influences and the progress of her musical career.

Nico: Do you feel that your new album; Libertine; differs from your previous releases?

Liv: Dues ex Machina was very atmospheric, reminding you a bit about Irish Enya, a real pop-album. Enter My Religion was more guitar-based and earthly with many interesting exotic folk influences. Skintight had some influence from Johnny Cash, which sometimes gives the listeners a warm and here-and-now camp-fire feeling experience. Libertine is a back-to-the-roots album, containing the most emotional ballads I’ve ever composed for a solo album, it even has a dark but sweet feeling to it, through both the piano, the dark bass lines and guitars. I see every album becoming more and more individual. Talking about genre, I would say all of my albums are somehow indie, pop, rock or metal.

N: Regarding the lyrics on the new release, are there are any stories behind the lyrics?

L: Libertine is full of wonderful moments that remind you of being in love, with someone, freedom, a scent, chocolate, or with life itself. As you might have guessed, I am myself a collector of those special moments in life when you feel love and happiness. This is what I want to give my listeners through my art. Skintight was very much connected to my childhood, therefore it was dedicated to the children of this world. However Libertine, as mentioned above, shares moments from my whole life so far, not only my childhood. Most songs are actually related to my life being a young woman, a mother, wife and lover of my husband. Libertine is dedicated to my sweet, wonderful younger sister, Carmen.

N: You’ve done a lot of vocal work in different bands and on different releases, which one would you say was the most enjoyable for you to partake in?

L: Except from my own bands, Leaves’ Eyes and Liv Kristine, it was the guestvocal appearances for Atrocity [Work 80] and Cradle of Filth [Nymphetamine]. Atrocity went straight into the charts, and the Cradle-duet was even nominated for the US Grammy. Motörhead won the Grammy… They deserved it, but I’m hoping for a second chance some day.

N: What song do you feel defines your career as a vocalist?

L: Silence, i.e. one of the tracks on Libertine. Just how much I love music and composing, I love the silence of nature even more. I grew up by the sea in complete peace and calamity. I need it, silence, to gain new inspiration, come up with interesting ideas, and, most of all, to recover.

N: When it comes to writing, where do you draw your inspiration from?

L: From my inner self, especially from my past experiences or, as already mentioned before, those special, little moments in live which you will remember for a lifetime.

N: You’ve been an active musician on the metal for almost 20 years now, do you feel that the scene has changed over the years? If so, how?

L: Generally, it’s funny considering the fact that back in in the mid nineties there were no such huge casting shows on TV. When we formed Theatre of Tragedy back then, we recorded a demo tape of four tracks, the whole thing lasting one day by the price of $50. Within the same month we had three offers for a record deal from different record labels. All we had to do was to choose. Remember we were a gothic doom metal band from a small place far out in Norway. That’s a dream coming true so quickly that some of the band’s original members left before the first album production. Too much excitement and pressure all of a sudden. Can you believe that? Signing a record deal, being a metal band is so much more complicated, expensive and difficult today, outstanding artists, headbangers or not, attend casting shows to get “somewhere”; to get a reaction from “someone”. Theatre of Tragedy just had this great “beauty [angelic voice] and the beast [growls]” idea, before anyone else, and we were awarded for it. No casting shows or music business machinery behind it, just a superb idea.

N: Given the years you’ve spent as a vocalist, do you feel as if there’s more you can learn about yourself? Or do you feel that you’ve learnt everything there is to learn about yourself?

L: I am learning all the time! Standing still, stagnation, is too me the worst thing that could happen being an artist. Libertine is a huge step forward for me in my career. I only follow my musical instinct and heart. I believe I was born with a creative heart and mind and I do need to develop, to spread my wings within music and art generally, which also means to be involved with different musical styles. There are no limits for me except for my own “stomach feeling”, that is that inner voice that helps me make my decisions and find my own ways. My wide experience has made me become the artist I am, and I feel completely free to spread my wings. Thanks to my friends and fans supporting me throughout all these years, and having faith in my natural-given talent. Some day, I will take my first singing lesson.

N: Do any of your personal beliefs or philosophies influence your writing?

L: Only one: do what you feel is the right thing to do, follow your musical instinct, and heart. But listen to advice, if it comes from a well-meaning, open-minded person.

N: A large portion of our readers are musicians and are in bands, from your own experience, do you have any advice you’d like to share with them?

L: Choose band mates who have both their legs safely situated on the ground. Theatre of Tragedy went down the drains because certain band members couldn’t handle the great and sudden success of the band. All of a sudden it was all about “being important” and NOT becoming a better-trained and intelligent artist, moreover, keeping loyalty and friendship safe within the band.

N: How did your journey into the world of music begin?

L: I started to sing even before I could walk or talk, however, I never had any musical education, and I never studied music – I studied linguistics, German, English and historic languages. It was my inner voice that told me that singing is a part of me, it just comes from the heart. Actually, when I was little, I thought that every human being could sing! Well, I guess I’m lucky, having a kind of perfect hearing. Coming to influences, I grew up with Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Edvard Grieg and Tschaikowsky, and female singers like Enya, Madonna, Kate Bush, Abba, Tori Amos and Monserrat Caballe. From the very beginning, I’ve followed my musical instinct: I wanted to combine a romantic, female, angelic voice with powerful, impressive music. Then suddenly, when I was 18 years old, I found myself in the middle of writing music history with Theatre of Tragedy.

N: Before we finish up, is there any you’d like to say to the readers?

L: I thank you for being there for me all these years, with Theatre of Tragedy, Leaves’ Eyes and my solo work. I hope you enjoy Libertine as much as I did composing and recording it. I can’t wait to play it live for you!

Don’t forget that Liv Kristine will be doing signing sessions for her new album Libertine on tour with Leaves’ Eyes this month and expect another interview from Liv as we’ll be interviewing her in Manchester on Friday.

Cradle of Filth announce European tour dates

Posted in News with tags , , , , on 5th September 2012 by Nico Davidson

UK extreme metallers Cradle of Filth have just announced a mammoth run of dates across Europe, including a one-off UK show at London’s Forum on 19th December. Happy Christmas! The band’s ringleader Dani Filth of the forthcoming touring event commented: “We are obviously enraptured at the prospect of ditching our Manatee suits and sweating it our night after night on tour across Europe. We have seemingly morphed into an American band of late, having toured there quite extensively, so it’s going to be awesome playing some of the places on our home continent we haven’t visited in a while. It’ll bring some much needed culture back to our humble frames. On the live front we have some great new ideas for our show, a new setlist, a new bassist and a new album, so expect, with the addition of Godseed and Rotting Christ, the tour to be a tentacular Dracula spectacular of rare and dizzying heights. Europe beware! The Manticore is coming! Long live the ‘Filth!

Cradle of Filth are set to release their new masterwork The Manticore & other Horrors this Hallowe’en on Peaceville Records.

The title of this, Cradle Of Filth’s tenth studio full-length, can be likened to a bestiary, a collection of stories on Monsters; personal demons, Chimeras, literary fiends and world-enslaving entities to blame but a few, Manticore being the ravening title track. It is a song about a beautiful mythological horror that comes to be feared as the disfigurehead of foreign occupation in the Indian provinces.

The songs Illicitus and Pallid Reflection bare the sweet ingredients of vampirism and lycanthropy; the wicked For Your Vulgar Delectation and Frost On her Pillow are woven perversely into grim fairytales, whilst classic, monumental tracks like The Abhorrent and Siding With The Titans both extol tentacular Lovecraftian values.

The album itself possesses an altogether new atmosphere for the band, incorporating a heavier, faster NWOBBM punk vibe that is both current and cruel, blended with ornate orchestration and the quirky immediateness of 2000′s Midian opus.

Recorded in eight weeks at both Springvale and Grindstone studios (where it was also mixed by Scott Atkins), Suffolk, the album is testament to the longevity of The ‘Filth, as not only does it reek of Cradle’s (feared or revered) brand of delicious metal vamperotica, but this thoroughly modern album places the band firmly in fresh killing fields anew.

Vocalist Dani Filth had this to say on the new album: ‘This is our tenth commandment in metal. We have diversified and kept alive the spirit of this band and breathed it into something that I can proudly say, slays like an absolute motherf**ker. The Manticore is coming… Long live the filth!

Cradle of Filth is also set to spread their darkness upon European lands with a tour throughout November & December.

07 Holland Haarlem, Patronaat
08  Holland Leeuwarden, Romeein
09 Germany Osnabrück, Hyde Park
10 Denmark Aarhus, Train
12 Sweden Gothenburg, Trädgarn
13 Sweden Stockholm, Klubben
15 Finland Tampere, Klubbi
16 Finland Helsinki, Nosturi
19 Belarus Minsk, Re:Public
20 Ukraine Kiev, Bingo
22 Poland Warsaw, Progressja
23 Poland Krakow, Kwadrat
24 Czech Zlin, Winter Masters Of Rock
26 Italy Bologna, Estragon
27 Italy Milan, Alcatraz (Small Hall)
29 France Montpellier, Rockstore
30 Spain Bilbao, Santana 27
01 Spain Santiago De Compostella, Capitol
02 Portugal Porto, Hard Club
04 Spain Madrid, La Riviera
05 Spain Barcelona, Salamandra
07 Germany Geiselwind, Musichall
08 Germany Bochum, Matrix
09 Swiss Pratteln, Z-7
11 Czech Prague, Meet Factory
13 Slovakia Bratislava, Majestic Music Club
14 Germany München, Theaterfabrik
15 Austria Wels, Schlachthof
16  Germany Berlin, C-Club
19  UK London, Forum

Dark End – Grand Guignol – Book I

Posted in CD, Metal with tags , , , , on 4th September 2012 by izaforestspirit

Dark End
Grand Guignol – Book I
Released in February2012
Symphonic Black Metal
Self-Released

‘Grand Guignol – Book I’ is the third album from the Italian symphonic black metal band Dark End. The band describe their style as “extreme horror metal” and have recently been confirmed as a support act for Cradle of Filth during their European tour.

Symphonic, atmospheric and theatrical seem like the best words to describe the opening track, an eerie instrumental called ‘Descent/Ascent (II Movement)’. Then it’s straight into symphonic black metal with ‘Æinsoph: Flashforward to Obscurity’, which comes complete with melodic keyboards and shrieking vocals that Dani Filth would be proud of. They have even managed to throw in a few guitar solos to spice up this blackened, gothic-horror opera.

‘Spiritism: The Transfiguration Passage’ and ‘Grief: Along Our Divine Pathway’ really do cement the band’s position as Italy’s answer to Cradle of Filth. All the elements are here; from the gothic, orchestral keyboards to the vocals which are a combination of black metal shrieks, part-growls and creepy whispers. In fact, I reckon that if these guys decided to do a cover of COF’s ‘Her Ghost in The Fog’ nobody would even notice the difference…This pretty much sets the tone for the rest of the album as the subsequent tracks offer more of the same; lengthy ballads of gothic horror in all its theatrical, symphonic keyboard-infused glory. The only exception is ‘Pest: Fierce Massive Grandeur’ which features some decent guitar riffs and solos making it stand out as only the song on here that isn’t entirely dominated by the keyboards.

3/5 – If Cradle of Filth isn’t your thing then there’s a good chance that you will hate these guys even more!

Iza Raittila

Cradle of Filth unveil new album artwork

Posted in News with tags , , , , , on 23rd August 2012 by Nico Davidson

Extreme Gothic outfit Cradle of Filth has revealed the cover art for its upcoming 10th studio album, The Manticore and Other Horrors, due out on October 29th in Europe via Peaceville Records and October 30th in North America via Nuclear Blast Records. Artwork comes courtesy of Matthew Vickerstaff of Darkwave Art.

Recorded in eight weeks at both Springvale and Grindstone studios (where it was also mixed by Scott Atkins), Suffolk, the album is a testament to the longevity of The ‘Filth, as not only does it reek of Cradle‘s (feared or revered) brand of delicious metal vamperotica, but this thoroughly modern album places the band firmly in fresh killing fields anew.

The Manticore and Other Horrors itself possesses an altogether new atmosphere for the band, incorporating a heavier, faster NWOBBM punk vibe that is both current and cruel, blended with ornate orchestration and the quirky immediateness of 2000′s Midian opus.

The album’s title can be likened to a bestiary, a collection of stories on monsters – personal demons, Chimeras, literary fiends and world-enslaving entities to blame but a few.

Commented the band’s infamous front man, Dani Filth, “This is our 10th commandment in metal. We have diversified and kept alive the spirit of this band and breathed it into something that I can proudly say, slays like an absolute motherf**ker. The Manticore is coming… Long live the filth!”

Iron Monkey’s Our Problem to be released on vinyl for the first time

Posted in News with tags , , , , , on 17th August 2012 by Nico Davidson

Our Problem, the classic 1998 album from UK aggro-doomsters Iron Monkey, is due to be released on limited edition vinyl for the first time ever on September 10th.

Our Problem was produced by Andy Sneap (Megadeth, Machine Head, Cradle of Filth, Testament, Exodus, Nevermore) and, along with the band’s self-titled debut album, single-handedly brought the US sludgecore sound to the UK underground.

The release is part of the First Time On Vinyl campaign, which plugs the gaps in the Earache catalogue that have never before been released on LP.

Our Problem will be released on double vinyl housed in a deluxe gatefold sleeve, and includes three bonus tracks taken from the deleted We’ve Learned Nothing split with Church Of Misery.  All profits will be donated to the UK National Kidney Federation in memory of the band’s late frontman, Johhny Morrow.  For more information, click here.

Our Problem is available to pre-order now in these strictly limited colours:

100 – Skol Super Gold (SOLD OUT!)
200 – Weed Green (ALMOST GONE!)
300 – Primate Brown
800 – Black

Pre-order the OUR PROBLEM vinyl now in Europe here or in North America here.

The full track listing for the OUR PROBLEM vinyl is as follows:

SIDE A:
01. Bad Year
02. Supagorgonizer
03. Boss Keloid
04. IRMS

SIDE B:
05. House Anxiety
06. 2 Golden Rules
07. 9 Joint Spiritual Whip

SIDE C:
08. Omi Bozu (Wisdom of Choking)
09. Sleep to Win *

SIDE D:
10. Arsonaut *
11. Kiss of Death *

* Bonus tracks

Iron Monkey‘s self-titled debut album is also available now on limited edition coloured vinyl from the Earache Webstore.

Damnation sponsored by Peaceville Records

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , on 24th July 2012 by Nico Davidson

Peaceville Records is proud to announce that, to coincide with celebrating 25 years of the label’s existence, we will be joining forces with Yorkshire’s own Damnation festival, as sponsoring partners. Damnation Festival, based in Leeds, UK, has brought a high-caliber of extreme metal’s finest & most diverse acts from around the globe to the north of England since launching in 2005.

Representing Peaceville on the night will be local doom heroes and heroine My Dying Bride – themselves a long-standing act on the label over a 20 year period of metallic tyranny – as the band return to the stage in support of their upcoming album due on Peaceville.

Since its inception in 1987, Peaceville Records has brought consistent quality & evolution to the metal universe, from early crust punk releases, to the death metal of Autopsy & At the Gates, through the black metal of Darkthrone, to being a leader of the gothic doom movement with the ‘Peaceville 3′; namely Paradise Lost, My Dying Bride & Anathema – all cementing the label’s legendary reputation as the home of doom. Later years saw numerous internationally renowned acts such as Katatonia & Opeth brought to the fold, & more recently the UK’s own Cradle of Filth.

“Damnation Festival are thrilled to be partnering up with Peaceville Records for the 2012 edition of the festival. It’s a killer label with an amazing history and we wish them a very happy birthday. Damnation fans will benefit from this fantastic partnership in the form of a free CD sampler featuring some of the best Peaceville tracks from the past two and half decades. There will be 2000 samplers on offer, so don’t forget to collect one alongside the complimentary programme courtesy of Terrorizer magazine. Here’s to the next 25!”

SJD set to tour Europe with Tristania

Posted in News with tags , on 21st June 2012 by Nico Davidson

Former Cradle of Filth backing vocalist Sarah Jezebel Deva is set to tour Europe with Tristania in September. The tour is presented by Zillo Magazine and dates are as followed:

14th Sep, Holland, Bibelot, Dordrecht.
15th Sep, Belgium, Onair Studio, Mons.
16th Sep, Holland, Boerderij, Zoetermeer.
17th Sep, England, The Underworld, London.
18th Sep, France, Glaz art, Paris.
20th Sep, Spain , Tunk, Irun.
21st Sep, Spain , Carasol, Madrid.
22th Sep, Spain , Mephisto, Barcelona
23th Sep, France, Poste a Galane, Marseille.
25th Sep, Germany, Bastard club, Osnabruck
26th Sep, Germany, K17, Berlin.
27th Sep, Switzerland, Z7, Pratteln.
28th Sep, Germany, Nachtleben, Frankfurt.
29th Sep, Germany, Turock, Essen.

Interview: Sarah Jezebel Deva, Dan Abela and Damjan Stefanovic [20th May 2012]

Posted in Interview with tags , , , , , on 23rd May 2012 by Nico Davidson

I was fortunate enough to be able to catch an interview with former Cradle of Filth backing vocalist Sarah Jezebel Deva and a couple of her band mates at Yardbirds in Grimsby, where we chatted about music, the tour, mythology and ctaching flights to and from Endor on a goose’s back.

Nico: You alright guys? Right, my first question is the most generic question, and one I’m so sick to death of asking bands but how’s the tour gone so far?

Dan: Yeah. It’s gone great, actually. We’ve had three gigs so far, so it’s going alright.

Sarah: One cancelled.

Dan: Yeah, one cancelled.

Sarah: Because of the promoter, being a… Well, you know. All the promoters we’ve had so far have taken chances on us and been so lovely to us, they’ve helped us, they know the situation, they know how hard it is for all the bands out there, people taking chances, people not taking chances and some of the promoters have had us back like Rob from here [Yardbirds, Grimsby] and Sal from Whiplash Productions in Liverpool. They’ve had us before, it didn’t go successful before, but they loved it and seem to believe in us and that’s what we’re happy with. And the fans, they believe in us, they’ve supported us and what more could you ask for? Of course, being anally screwed everyday isn’t good but if it wasn’t for the niceness of the fans and the promoters.

Dan: Don’t stay at Travel Lodge. Use Premier Inn.

Sarah: Oh no, some of the Travel Lodges have been really, really nice.

Nico: Eh, moving on, your new EP Malediction is due for release at the end of the month [28th May], what would you say are the biggest influences behind it?

Sarah: Madonna. Prince. Boyzone. Serbian rap artist that I can’t pronounce the name of. Our influences? If I could answer this before you [Dan] say something stupid like Nightwish and…

Dan: I was gonna say Lacuna Coil.

Sarah: I actually don’t think our influences shine majorly through our music. We are predominantly into extreme metal. Apart from him over there who likes Beatles and Chas and Dave but we are predominantly a band that are into extreme metal and we try to let that shine through. We do not want to be the typical female fronted band. We try to make sure it’s not the typical female-fronted band. We don’t sing about dragons, butterflies, getting a flight from Endor on a goose’s back.

Nico: You’ve just pretty much described Nightwish’s lyrics there.

Dan: Over the hills and very far away.

Sarah: So, if I was going to say what our influences are on this album, mostly me and Dan wrote the EP but I would say our influences are just extreme metal and we don’t try to copy anyone. Though there’s going to be loads of people, because we’ve had Dani Filth on one track, "oh, it’s Cradle of Filth!" – No, it’s not. It’s SJD. Having Björn Strid [Soilwork] on one of the songs, it doesn’t sound like Soilwork but people are still gonna label you so, yeah, our influences are basically whatever happens happens.

Dan: I like black metal and I know you do too, Sarah, but I mean that’s the thing. It’s a funny old one, I would say it is predominantly like the old black and death metal scene.

Damjan: I think it depends on who writes the riffs, like the song with Björn on it, Dan basically wrote all the riffs for that.

Sarah: Actually that’s not completely true.

Damjan: Dan wrote of the riffs for that. Anyway, from my point of view on the drums, I’m not as into death metal as these guys are, so when I heard the riffs and stuff, it was more about listening to them and thinking "How am I going to make this feel and sound the best it could be? How am I going to make sure it’s not a repetitive thing over and over again? And when it changes section, how do I make sure each section stands out without having to over play it or over complicate it?".

Sarah: As he [Damjan] says, he’s not into the same type of stuff as us which is great because you have the diversity.

Damjan: There’s a bit of crossover but not as much. So for me, it’s just about writing stuff that’s going to sound memorable that I’d wanna listen to again and I think we managed that.

Sarah: And we’ve got to give the bassist, Ablaz, some credit as well. He predominately wrote When It Catches Up With You. Dan just made it sound better. No, not like that. Obviously when I come up with a song, like Silence Please and The Eyes That Lie, I present them to Dan and he changes a few bits, just like Damjan has produced a song, for the next album but we’ll change little bits to suit his playing and the way I sing and the way the others play. So we all contribute but up until recently, it’s been predominately me and Dan.

Damjan: I think that’s really to do with the line-up and it changing as much as it has.

Sarah: Yeah, the line-up has changed but as a band, and I know we’re totally straying away from the question now, but as a band we have totally gelled together. We just need to get Damjan into some good music.

Nico: Going back to what you’ve just been saying about the song writing, since you and Dan are the main songwriters, how does a song writing session go between you two? Do you go off into separate rooms and do your own thing or do you get together and jam?

Sarah: We write really well together. It’s a bit hard for me sometimes because I don’t play guitar. But when I’ve got a riff, I sing it to him and he spends a week working it out but me and him gel and it’s hard to break away from that when we know other people wanna get involved. It’s funny because we’ve had the argument before that no one gets involved and now they’re all wanting to get involved. It’s always relaxed, really, isn’t it?

Dan: Basically, all we do is go into the studio and start working. We always go in with the intention of writing a new song, it’s never one of those things where people say "oh yeah, phoned them in the middle of the night and told them I have an amazing riff". We always go in there and get our ideas together and present. We always do it in the studio, which I find helps because obviously I run it, so we just set up and get going.

Sarah: Legacy London Studios.

Dan: And that’s what good because we always put it from the point of view that we are going to play these songs live as well. We’re not one of those bands goes "let’s go do something that’s completely…" and then you can’t do it live. It’s what I hate, especially when you see certain bands and hear their albums and you think "Fuck me, that’s incredible!" but you know you’ll never hear it.

Nico: That’s true. Going back to what I was about influences earlier, where do you find the influence for your lyrics?

Sarah: Life, people, shit people, good people. I find it easier to write about shit people than good people because they’re really boring. All the shit experiences I’ve had in life, situations, circumstances, situations that have affected the people close to me. I’ve done a few kind of mythological songs, like Sirens and Silence Please. Silence Please is about a banshee, but you know, the evil banshee.

Nico: I thought banshees were always evil. If you look into the Irish mythology…

Sarah: Well, you’ve got the sirens of the sea, which are theoretically banshees as well, since they signify death.

Nico: I always thought the sirens were different to the banshees, with one being Greek and the other being Irish, unless I’ve got something mixed up.

Dan: Yeah, they invented the euro.

Sarah: Sirens lead sailors to the rocks, they use their beauty to lead them to their deaths. But yeah, there’s a few other songs I’ve written about mythology and fantasy. I’m Calling by Angtoria for example, I know this isn’t Angtoria but I’m Calling is about when I used to go into the bathroom and roleplay.

Dan: [suppressed laughter]

Sarah: Don’t laugh! You know like kids have imaginary friends, well I had an imaginary boyfriend who would whisk – Okay, this is what happened. Basically, instead of washing, I would have this thing in my head of this evil man feeding me evil pills and then this prince would ride up and save me from the evil guy. They were little fizzy kinda pills, could have been sterogen for false teeth, I don’t know but I swallowed. That’s what it’s about, just fantasising as a kid. But as I was saying, most of my lyrics are based on shit people, shit in life, bad things. I just cannot sing about good things, I find it very, very difficult. And I can’t sing about things I know nothing about either, like even, Silence Please – My bed use to be near the window and you know foxes make that – beautiful as they are are – make that horrible sound and it’s a scary fucking sound. And I read about banshees once and I was convinced that sound outside my window was a banshee. Used to scare the shit out of me. So, that’s what that’s based on, a nightmare and such. But yeah, I just write about things I know about. As I said, I can’t write about dragons and fucking Endor and…

Nico: So, basically you can’t do the whole Nightwish lyrical concept?

Sarah: I just can’t.

Damjan: I personally have never been into that, so I prefer this kind of thing.

Sarah: I just think you need to sing about what you know, I’m not saying I’ll never expand.

Damjan: I find as a musical listener, that’s the kind of thing you relate to more.

Sarah: And I’ve been very lucky, the fan connection has been phenomenal. The amount of people that come to me and who can relate to my lyrics. I’m glad I can do that. I’m glad I’ve lowered the suicide rate.

Azz: Going back to what you said about lyrics and singing about things you know about, I don’t see how anyone can put emotion and energy into anything that’s bullshit fantasy stuff anyway.

Sarah: Exactly, exactly. I think you need to connect with your audience and you know, a lot of my lyrics are depressing. Like, This Is My Curse is about the fur industry. And I was saying to Dan when I was writing the lyrics, I didn’t want it forced into people’s faces. Most people won’t know it’s about the fur industry, until you read it and see what Dani Filth contributed lyrically. These animals are raised and are treated like absolute shit and then skinned alive for fur, for fashion. And I would loved to have said that in a song but it doesn’t come across and it would have sounded crap. So, you have to find a poetic way to get your message across. And as I said, you gotta have feeling for that audience to believe what you’re singing about, that you have passion about your music. You have to really feel and know to get that message across and I think we do. I know these guys don’t write my lyrics but they know that I am quite a big person but take A Matter Of Convenience, that’s based on people who like to shag around.

Nico: Sounds like the population of Brid to be truthful… Anyway, moving on, you guys have been confirmed to tour with Tristania in Europe later this year. How are you feeling about it? Like going from headline tours of the UK to support act in Europe?

Sarah: Azz isn’t doing the Europe tour and it’s a bit of a sour subject, so he’s sitting out for this one but he will be doing everything else over here over us, which is as equally important but it’s a brilliant step for us because it goes up.

Dan: We’ve met them a few times before as well and we get on really well with them. So, that’s going to be on the things that’s cool about it is the fact that it won’t be strangers walking into the same room together.

Sarah: We just hope this is a step up for us. We’ve got some stuff going on in December and obviously the Female Metal Voices Festival in Belgium as well. We’ve had some amazing things go on this year but the last three weeks has obviously knocked some of us down. Me and Dan mostly, because we’ve put so much into it, that’s not to say no one else but because me and Dan predominately run as much as we can because other people have got other stuff going on. So, it’s affected us more, so hopefully what’s going on the end of this year will set us up for next year.

Dan: And you’re definitely going to see a big change for the next album.

Nico: Sounds good, sounds good. Right, this next question is for you, Sarah. Back in December, you announced you would be featuring on the new Cradle album: Midnight in the Labyrinth, which obviously came as a shock to a lot of us. How did that come about? Because obviously for a while you’ve said you wouldn’t be working again with Cradle of Filth.

Sarah: Nostalgia. I love the old Cradle albums, love the old Cradle songs. To be able to sing those songs again and because I knew it would make a lot of older Cradle fans happy. I thought it would be good for us. I think that me and Dani go well together, vocally.

Nico: Well, to be honest, in my opinion, I think Cradle’s sound, in the female vocals, has drastically gone down hill since you department. No disrespect to your replacement.

Sarah: There’s been a few.

Nico: Really? Why doesn’t anyone tell me these things?

Sarah: Well because it’s band lies. Like when we fire Damjan, it will be due to unforeseen circumstances but really, I don’t think any band really do tell the truth, I don’t think many bands tell the truth. I think some bands find it unprofessional to tell the truth but we try to always tell the truth because in the end you need a fucking good memory to lie. It’s lovely that a lot of people do think that but there’s probably are the same number of people who think I’m shit. But in my defense and I’ve said this in loads of interviews, when you’re just a backing singer in a band, you don’t have any rights and you can’t control how you sound and no one takes you seriously. I’m sure if you flick through YouTube, you’ll find lots of videos taken from mobile phones and other footage of me sounding like I’ve got my head up a cow’s arse. Some of it is atrocious, it’s because if you can’t hear yourself, you can’t pitch and that’s one of the reasons why I was glad to not be with Cradle of Filth any more because I’m a singer. It’s my life and I’ve spent fourteen years doing oohs and aahs and now I can prove I actually have a voice. Going back to do the Cradle album is no big deal and I enjoyed. I said nostalgia but there’s a lot of rumours going around that I’m going to join them. Would I go back? I’ve had this question with Dan, as in Dan Abela. If the circumstances were right, I would do some stuff. But at the end of the day, they also have to want me back. It’s got to be a mutual thing and for the right reasons.

Nico: Speaking of the rumours, I’ve had several e-mails from my readers and your fans, basically asking if there’s ever going to be the possibility of you doing  a tour or a one-off live show with Cradle sometime in the future. doing tracks from the albums you’ve featured on?

Sarah: I can’t answer that. Whatever will be, will be. Under the impression that they 100% don’t have a female singer and they’ve got Wacken coming up. I’ve said to Dani, if you want help, I will step in. Let’s see what holds. But this band comes first! I will not sacrifice anything for this band. This band comes first.

Nico: Going back to what you’ve been saying about Cradle, at the same time you announced that you’d be featuring on the next Cradle album, you said you’d be going back to work with Angtoria at some point in the future, so, what is happening with Angtoria at the moment? When can we expect something from Angtoria?

Sarah: I think again it’s a case of when it happens, it happens. Chris has a studio and he’s so busy working for other bands. We did try put a timeline of May on it but it’s just not gonna happen. It’s gonna be when it happens. I hope we have something by the end of this year. It will happen because me and Chris are close, we get on well and we’re on the same page. It’s the same kind of relationship as me and Dan. It’s really just a case of when it happens and I hope it does.

Nico: Well, I know a lot of your fans, my brother included, want it to happen. So obviously, there’s a lot of people looking forward to any news about Angtoria – Well, any good news about Angtoria. My next question is for you, Dan. Now, obviously you run your own studio, Legacy London, as a studio proprietor, producer and sound guy, how do you feel that home recording is affecting the face of music, compared to studio recording?

Dan: It’s a very hard question because in terms of people doing their own recording, I think there’s nothing wrong with that. I think it’s a good thing that people are embracing technology and I think they’re getting better as song writers but a lot of the time I think they’re getting lazier as players, being brutally honest with you. But I don’t think that people realise the amount of time it takes for a band to a good album and this is what you see a lot of these days and people that go into a good studio and spend a good amount of time working on a professional album. You can always tell when a band has a good album and when they’ve half arsed it. Even with bigger bands. You see a lot of bigger bands these days: "Yeah, we decided to self-produce it" and they’ve done a massive record before and funnily enough that massive record before sounds amazing and the next one sounds shite. Fucking shite. The guy who runs the studio with me, Joe, me and him literally spend the best part of the whole day, every day, working with bands and you need that other person’s input, you really do. You need someone else to tell you what’s right, what’s wrong, even like, I’m in my own band and I’m recording it, you lose sight, always. You always lose the goal, you need someone whose got that extra set of ears to tell you where you’re going wrong and where you’re going right and obviously Joe does that for us. But bands need that.

Damjan: I think that really depends on the specific band or person you’re thinking about because one of my other bands, we recorded the drums with Dan and the rest at home but we still had that input from Dan and we’ve been recording with him for years, like EPs and stuff. But I think it depends on what you want out of music and your own personal music and for some people, it’s a money issue as well. It depends what direction you wanna take it.

Nico: Alright, next questions. What would you say is the most challenging thing about being a musician?

Sarah: Most challenging thing? As long as we communicate with each other, there’s nothing that is challenging, as long as we’re honest with each other. We’re not always going to agree with one another, I’m not always going to like his riff and he’s not always gonna like my melody, we’ve just got to make sure we don’t lie to each other and that we communicate with each other and I think a lot of bands have lost that. Now, I do know that the bigger the band gets, the more politics are involved, money, managers. The bigger the bands get, the greedier people get. The more people want a cut of what you do. It’s all us that put in the fucking hard work and as long as we don’t lose sight and are all open minded. I wouldn’t say this is challenging, I’m just saying that we all have to pull our shit together and make it work.

Nico: Last couple of questions now. Where would you like to see the band in five years time?

Dan: I don’t mind where we end up, so long as it’s a natural progression. It’s like I think we have the potential to carry on for another five years but we’ll just see where it ends up really. Maybe in a bin. Hopefully next year, you’ll see a few progressions in the tours and maybe some festivals and another album as well. It should just carry on as it is.

Nico: Alright, before we finish up, do you guys have anything to say to the readers?

Dan: Thank you for your support.

Sarah: Just give us a chance, whether you’re a fan or not. Whoever’s reading, you’ve got to give new bands a chance. So, forget what you think you know. If you’re judging someone on their image, or a bit of footage on YouTube that’s been filmed on a mobile phone, make up your own mind by actually leaving your house and checking these bands out because you could be missing a real gem.

Dan: Put it this way, any band you name, be it In Flames, Soilwork, Cradle of Filth, Dimmu Borgir, they all started off playing in a pub somewhere. Go support local bands because if you want your next Metallicas and your next Iron Maidens, they’re always going to start in these small venues, so go down and support local metal.

Sarah: Yeah, you have to because all these bands started somewhere with a chance and I know that people don’t have the money and sadly you do have to pay to see a band but nothing’s free. Just because you’re payign a ticket of £6 doesn’t mean the band is getting that money and then off down to the pub later. It’s that ticket price which is helping the bands to play your local area. Without the support and open mindedness of the listener, the scene is going to die and after the conversations with certain good promoters, who are struggling, who are not going to be promoting, the good promoters leave and the little kid promoters come in thinking "Ah, I can make some money from this band" and the moment when that’s what you’ve got in every city, goodbye to the scene, I’m telling ya. We’ve dealt with that, a few kids, even on the first tour with The Dead Lay Waiting, a kid thinking "I’ll charge £9 on the door, this and that, gonna do really well", he lost shit loads of money because he got greedy and cancelled the next show, fucking over the people that were gonna go to that show. I know it costs to do these gigs but it’s not about money, if you believe in the scene, you’ve got to take chances. Don’t read rumours, make up your own mind, you know? Even album reviews, it takes a year…

Dan: He reviews albums…

Nico: Don’t worry about it.

Sarah: What I mean is that it takes us, as a band, a year to write an album, to produce it, to mix it, to master it, to sit down. It takes a reviewer less than five minutes to rip it apart. There’s good productive journalism and there’s fucking lazy journalism that goes "sounds like this band, sounds like that band". Again, there’s a large amount of journalists who want their five minutes of fame. Reviewers need to remember that they have the capability of influencing thousands of people with their opinion and it’s your opinion if you think we’re shit or not. It’s up to the listener to think "This review thinks it’s shit but you know what, I’m going to go check it out". I think we’re losing that ability to think for ourselves and allowing ourselves to be dictated by magazines and adverts.

Nico: Very true. Well, thanks for that, guys and have a great show tonight.

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